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I'm in the process of upgrading my website, and this involves the decision of using the new HTML5 semantic elements <nav> <header> <footer> <aside> <section> over regular old <div> elements.

I do plan on supporting IE7 and IE8, but I know that these versions don't support the above semantic elements. I've read up about 'plugins' like Modernizr, Initializr and HTML5shiv, and I know that older browsers will then support the new elements IF JavaScript is enabled, but what am I supposed to do if it's not?

By default, the <html> tag is given the class of no-js and if JavaScript is enabled, Modernizr/Initializr replaces this class with js. That's all well and good, but there are some things I'm uncertain about. So far, what is covered?

Sorted

  • IF JavaScript is enabled, IE7 and IE8 are supported by Modernizr/Initializr.
  • With a reset.css file, other older browsers support these new tags.
  • Modern browsers are all fine.

Problems

  • IF JavaScript is disabled, what am I supposed to do about IE8 and below? The no-js class is added to the <html> tag, so what exactly can I do with that?
  • How can I use <noscript> to my advantage here? I don't want to make pages too large with coding.

So, aside from those questions, I also want to ask if it's really worth using these tags, when I can just use good ol' <div> tags which would both support older browsers and also keep file sizes down by eliminating the required coding to make the new tags work in older browsers?

Thank you, Dylan.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Pointy, Doorknob, cimmanon, Jukka K. Korpela, unor Nov 2 '13 at 18:30

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    What do you think the percent viewership would be with javascript disabled? Is that really something you need to design for any more? – jfriend00 Nov 2 '13 at 16:40
  • @jfriend00 I would expect it to be pretty low; around 5%, but 5% of the population of the US is a large number in itself, let alone the world. And any good web developer would want as much traffic as possible. – DylRicho Nov 2 '13 at 17:02
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    Seriously 5%? Where do you get that number from? – jfriend00 Nov 2 '13 at 17:07
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    Should we provide old school inline formatting for users who disable css? – Vitim.us Nov 2 '13 at 17:12
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    I would guess for IE7/8 and no JS about 1%, which is negligible. Future proofing, of course is more important than past proofing. – bjb568 Nov 14 '13 at 19:48
2

It's good practice to use both, for example

<nav>
    <div>
        <ul>
        <!-- etc -->
        </ul>
    </div>
</nav>

If you need to support those obsolete browsers, I wouldn't do anything more than that. The benefits, such as they are, are not worth the extra effort.

  • That's actually a very good idea, but wouldn't this then add unwanted padding/margins by using block elements within each other? – DylRicho Nov 2 '13 at 16:33
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    @DylRicho: You'd ensure that the padding/margin of nav was 0, because that's what it will be on IE7/8 if the shiv isn't loaded (I think). The problem, though, is that then in your normal CSS, you'd always have to style the div, not the nav. The nav would be extra, purely for semantics. But if you really want to support these old browsers without JavaScript (and wow that's a small demographic), I don't see much choice. :-) – T.J. Crowder Nov 2 '13 at 16:38
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    @DylRicho You have to ask yourself WHY you want to use semantic tags. The only possible answer is search engines - accessibility could be a second, but you can use aria roles for that. So, really, using old school divs for footers, nav, etc, and wrapping them with the new HTML 5 elements is good enough IMHO. I can't see any benefits in doing anything more than that. – gotofritz Nov 2 '13 at 21:44
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    Well, you double the work, and also some tags are not meant to be styled (I am thinking of 'section'), but apart for that there is nothing wrong – gotofritz Nov 5 '13 at 15:57
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    html5doctor.com is always a good source – gotofritz Nov 6 '13 at 13:31
1

I do plan on supporting IE7 and IE8, but I know that these versions don't support the above semantic elements. I've read up about 'plugins' like Modernizr, Initializr and HTML5shiv, and I know that older browsers will then support the new elements IF JavaScript is enabled, but what am I supposed to do if it's not?

If JavaScript is not enabled, then while the content of the new elements will be shown, CSS will not be correctly applied to them. While in theory you could use a noscript element to trigger a redirect to a version of the page not using the new elements (via a meta refresh tag within the noscript), then you'd be maintaining two versions of your site.

For example, given this page: Live Copy

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
<title>HTML5 Elements</title>
  <style>
    nav {
      color: green;
    }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  <nav><ul><li>This text should be green</li></ul></nav>
</body>
</html>

...early versions of IE will show the text in the default color. Adding the HTML5 shiv prior to the style element:

<script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/html5shiv/3.6.2/html5shiv.js"></script>

...which as you know requires JavaScript, makes the text green: Live Copy

1

It's not necessary to follow the new semantic. New semantic is developed mostly for search engines, not for site functionality. If you really want to support IE, do it for IE.

If you really consider no-script cases and CSS is not enough for you, than all you can do is PHP/ASP magic.

One my friend works exclusively in Flash, because no js, totally client side, no cares about browsers... Who knows...

0

Should I use the new HTML5 semantic elements?

Yes.

IF JavaScript is disabled, what am I supposed to do about IE8 and below? The no-js class is added to the tag, so what exactly can I do with that?

You can do something like this,

HTML

  <div id='wrapper'>
     // Whole website coding here
    </div>
    <div id='old-browsers'>
      Use an upgraded browser
    </div>

CSS

    .no-js #wrapper {
      display: none;
    }

    #old-browsers {
     display: none;
    }

    .no-js #old-browsers {
      display:block;
    }

How can I use to my advantage here? I don't want to make pages too large with coding.

IE Consideration:

IE7 is 7 years old and most developers today do not support it. IE7 / IE8 users with js disabled is pretty low and you shouldnt develop for those exceptions. Instead you should give them a suggestion to upgrade with above method. You can use the noscript tag for the same usecase.

  • this is not helpful at all; -1 and flagged as VLQ – Doorknob Nov 2 '13 at 16:29
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    No, "yes" is a comment. To be an answer, you actually have to explain it. – Doorknob Nov 2 '13 at 16:34
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    Protip: if you have a detailed answer, wait until you have finished writing it before hitting submit. – BoltClock Nov 2 '13 at 16:42
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    How to Answer and common sense. – Doorknob Nov 2 '13 at 16:48
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    If you are recoding the entire thing, use HTML5 elements. Every answer on this page advises the same. – Jashwant Nov 2 '13 at 17:15
-1

What you could do (and what a lot of big website's do) is to display a notice when javascript is disabled (optionally when the browser is IE7 or IE8 but you'll need a serverside check for that), that the website would not be displayed the way it is supposed to. See "How to detect if JavaScript is disabled?" on how to do so.

Only 5.3% (source) of internet users are using Internet Explorer < 8 and 0.25% to 2% (source) of the total users have Javascript disabled. You could spend a lot of time making a smooth solution for max 5% x 2% = 0,01% of your visitors or you could spend 5 minutes building the notice system I described.

  • Thank you for the information; I would be considering PHP to detect user agents for a mobile version anyway, so extra PHP would be fine. However, if the number of users with JS disabled is really that low, I wouldn't mind simply going with the semantic elements. Of course, I'd still want to support IE8 and below, so JS would be required, but then when you think of Facebook and how many users it has, JS must practically be a requirement by most websites for a better experience. For the mobile version, I was considering some <noscript> goodness, but I'm yet to think that through. – DylRicho Nov 2 '13 at 16:54
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    -1: just because 5.3% of internet users are using IE7 and below doesn't mean 5.3% of OP's potential users are using IE7 and below. For example, desktops at corporations generally have a higher IE usage than iOS users, so it's always important to know the demographics – SheetJS Nov 2 '13 at 17:03
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    @Nirk I agree. I also think W3School's statistics only reflect what's visiting their website, and not a representation of worldwide statistics (which is probably hard to achieve). – DylRicho Nov 2 '13 at 17:07

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