6

I often find myself running into problems where two (related) values of a control get updated, and both would trigger an expensive operation, or possibly the control could get temporarily in an inconsistent state.

For example, consider a data binding where two values (x,y) get substracted from each other, and the end result is used as a divisor for some other property z:

z / (x - y)

If x and y are bound to some external value, then updating them one at a time could lead to unexpected division by zero errors, depending on which property gets updated first and what the old value of the other property is. The code that updates property z just listens on changes in both x and y -- it has no way of knowing in advance that another update is coming for the other property.

Now this problem is fairly easy to avoid, but there are other similar cases, like setting width and height... do I resize the window right away or wait for another change? Do I allocate memory for the specified width and height right away or do I wait? If the width and height was 1 and 1 million, and then gets updated to 1 million and 1, then temporarily I'd have a width and height of 1 million x 1 million...

This can be a fairly general question, although for me specifically it would apply to JavaFX Bindings. I'm interested in ways how to deal with these situations without running into undefined behaviour or doing expensive operations that need to be redone as soon as another binding changes.

The thing I've done so far to avoid these situations is to clear bindings first to known values before setting new values, but this is a burden on the code updating the bindings that it really shouldn't have to know about.

1

I am only now learning JavaFX so take this answer with a grain of salt... and any corrections are welcome. I was interested myself with this, so did a little research.

Invalidation listeners

The answer to this problem is partially the InvalidationListener. You can read the docs in detail here, but the essence is that a ChangeLister propagates the change immediately, while the InvalidationListener takes a note that a value is invalid but defers the computation until it is needed. An example demonstrating the two cases based on the "z / (x - y)" calculation:

First, the trivial stuff:

import javafx.beans.InvalidationListener;
import javafx.beans.Observable;
import javafx.beans.binding.DoubleBinding;
import javafx.beans.binding.NumberBinding;
import javafx.beans.property.SimpleDoubleProperty;
import javafx.beans.value.ChangeListener;
import javafx.beans.value.ObservableNumberValue;
import javafx.beans.value.ObservableValue;

public class LazyExample
{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        changeListenerCase();
        System.out.println("\n=====================================\n");
        invalidationListenerCase();
    }
    ...
}

The 2 cases (change and invalidation listener) will set up 3 variables, x, y, z, the computed expression z / (x - y) and the appropriate listener. Then they call a manipulate() method to change the values. All steps are logged:

    public static void changeListenerCase() {
        SimpleDoubleProperty x = new SimpleDoubleProperty(1);
        SimpleDoubleProperty y = new SimpleDoubleProperty(2);
        SimpleDoubleProperty z = new SimpleDoubleProperty(3);

        NumberBinding nb = makeComputed(x,y,z);

        nb.addListener(new ChangeListener<Number>() {
            @Override public void changed(ObservableValue<? extends Number> observable, Number oldValue, Number newValue) {
                System.out.println("ChangeListener: " + oldValue + " -> " + newValue);
            }
        });

        // prints 3 times, each after modification
        manipulate(x,y,z);

        System.out.println("The result after changes with a change listener is: " + nb.doubleValue());
    }

    public static void invalidationListenerCase() {
        SimpleDoubleProperty x = new SimpleDoubleProperty(1);
        SimpleDoubleProperty y = new SimpleDoubleProperty(2);
        SimpleDoubleProperty z = new SimpleDoubleProperty(3);

        NumberBinding nb = makeComputed(x,y,z);

        nb.addListener(new InvalidationListener() {
            @Override public void invalidated(Observable observable) {
                System.out.println("Invalidated");
            }
        });

        // will print only once, when the result is first invalidated
        // note that the result is NOT calculated until it is actually requested
        manipulate(x,y,z);

        System.out.println("The result after changes with an invalidation listener is: " + nb.doubleValue());
    }

And the common methods:

    private static NumberBinding makeComputed(final ObservableNumberValue x, final ObservableNumberValue y, final ObservableNumberValue z) {
        return new DoubleBinding() {
            {
                bind(x,y,z);
            }
            @Override protected double computeValue() {
                System.out.println("...CALCULATING...");
                return z.doubleValue() / (x.doubleValue()-y.doubleValue());
            }
        };
    }

    private static void manipulate(SimpleDoubleProperty x, SimpleDoubleProperty y, SimpleDoubleProperty z) {
        System.out.println("Changing z...");
        z.set(13);
        System.out.println("Changing y...");
        y.set(1);
        System.out.println("Changing x...");
        x.set(2);
    }

The output from this is:

...CALCULATING...
Changing z...
...CALCULATING...
ChangeListener: -3.0 -> -13.0
Changing y...
...CALCULATING...
ChangeListener: -13.0 -> Infinity
Changing x...
...CALCULATING...
ChangeListener: Infinity -> 13.0
The result after changes with a change listener is: 13.0

=====================================

...CALCULATING...
Changing z...
Invalidated
Changing y...
Changing x...
...CALCULATING...
The result after changes with an invalidation listener is: 13.0

So in the first case there is an excessive number of calculations and an infinity case. In the second the data is marked invalidated on the first change and then recalculated only when needed.

The Pulse

What about binding graphical properties, e.g. the width and height of something (as in your example)? It seems that the infrastructure of JavaFX does not apply changes to graphical properties immediately, but according to a signal called the Pulse. The pulse is scheduled asynchronously and, when executed, will update the UI based on the current state of the properties of the nodes. Each frame in an animation and each change of UI properties will schedule a pulse to be run.

I do not know what happens in your example case where, having initial width=1px and height=106px, the code sets width=106px (in one step, schedules pulse) and then height=1px (second step). Does the second step emit another pulse, if the first hasn't been processed? The reasonable thing to do from JavaFX's point of view is for the pipeline to process only 1 pulse event, but I need some reference for that. But, even if two events are processed, the first should process the entire state change (both width and height) so changes occur in one visual step.

The developer will have to be consious of the architecture I believe. Suppose a separate task does (pseudocode):

width = lengthyComputation();
Platform.runLater(node.setWidth(width));
height = anotherLengthyComputation();
Platform.runLater(node.setHeight(height));

I guess if the first pulse event has a chance to run, then the user will see a change of width - pause - a change of height. It would be better to write this as (again, always in a background task) (pseudocode):

width = lengthyComputation();
height = anotherLengthyComputation();
Platform.runLater(node.setWidth(width));
Platform.runLater(node.setHeight(height));

UPDATE (Comment from john16384): According to this it is not possible to listen to the pulse directly. However, one can extend certain methods of javafx.scene.Parent that are run once per pulse and achieve the same effect. So you either extend layoutChildren(), if no changes to the children tree is required or either of computePrefHeight(double width)/computePrefWidth(double height), if the children tree will be modified.

  • The Pulse may work for my usecase -- there is a ScenePulseListener. To be more clear, the "lengthy computation" is done by listeners on the width/height properties, not by user code (user just says w=1000000, h=1). What I want to avoid is that the listeners adjust the final dimensions twice -- marking the final dimension as "invalid" and then recalculating it on a Pulse could be a great solution. Since the Pulse will run on the same thread as the modification the user makes there won't be any race conditions either where only width was updated, but height wasn't updated yet. – john16384 Nov 5 '13 at 15:06
  • The solution I was looking for indeed was related to the Pulse -- although ScenePulseListener is not public API, there is another way to trigger an operation on the next Pulse. A discussion on the JavaFX mailinglist led me to the solution to call requestLayout() when a property changes, which will schedule a call to layoutChildren() on the next Pulse. Multiple calls to requestLayout() will only result in one call to layoutChildren, and so it allows me to defer any expensive changes to other controls until the changes are finalized. – john16384 Nov 7 '13 at 16:32
  • This is very interesting. Can you share the link? – Nikos Paraskevopoulos Nov 7 '13 at 16:38
  • Very interesting information, Nikos. Thanks for sharing. – chooks Nov 7 '13 at 18:11
  • Link to the post in the mailinglist that explains using requestLayout(): mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/openjfx-dev/2013-November/… – john16384 Nov 11 '13 at 4:07
0

These cases show that databinding can't be used everywhere. It is based on events so you finally get all the troubles with event driven architecture with race conditions etc...

So I'd say: don't use it in cases where side effects can be unpredictable and deadly. For instance, in your case stick to a basic method that sets the two properties depending on each other and old values which you can call at a safe time, even periodically, even by dirty checking values. It is small computation if you can do the two operations together so it should not be an issue.

Databinding is great, but not for everything. It is not a religion (still a great tool). Don't overuse it: simplicity over cleverness should apply here, don't hack it, it'd become quickly undebuggable.

  • Yes, I've considering wrapping the related values in an Object so you can manipulate related properties with just one change -- however, I see a lot of related properties offered in the standard JavaFX controls which donot cause unnecessary recalculations so I'm hoping there is another way to deal with these situations – john16384 Nov 5 '13 at 15:10
0

Scratching things a little further and based on my previous answer, I came up with some code that I believe solves the case. It does need refinement, as it is only meant to demonstrate the principles.

An expensive operation that doesn't take long

This would be the case of a memory allocation. It doesn't (?) take long, but it is expensive, in the sense you do not want excessive allocations to occur. The code that runs in response to the dimensions change runs in the main thread (this may not be correct, please correct me).

import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.application.Platform;
import javafx.beans.InvalidationListener;
import javafx.beans.Observable;
import javafx.beans.binding.ObjectBinding;
import javafx.event.ActionEvent;
import javafx.event.EventHandler;
import javafx.geometry.Dimension2D;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.Button;
import javafx.scene.layout.StackPane;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

public class ExpensiveQuickCalculationExample extends Application
{
    @Override
    public void start(final Stage primaryStage) {
        primaryStage.setTitle("Lazy Example");

        Button btn = new Button();
        btn.setText("Manipulate");
        btn.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
            @Override public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
                //////////////////////////////////
                // DIMENSIONS MANIPULATION HERE //
                //////////////////////////////////
                primaryStage.setHeight(150);
                primaryStage.setWidth(150);
            }
        });

        StackPane root = new StackPane();
        root.getChildren().add(btn);
        primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(root, 300, 250));
        primaryStage.show();


        final ObjectBinding<Dimension2D> stageDimBinding = makeWindowDimensionsBinding(primaryStage);
        stageDimBinding.addListener(new InvalidationListener() {
            @Override public void invalidated(Observable observable) {
                System.out.println("---> Dimensions INVALIDATED");
                Platform.runLater(new Runnable() {
                    @Override public void run() {
                        expensiveQuickCalculation(stageDimBinding.get());
                    }
                });
            }
        });
    }

    private ObjectBinding<Dimension2D> makeWindowDimensionsBinding(final Stage stage) {
        return new ObjectBinding<Dimension2D>() {
            {
                bind(stage.widthProperty(), stage.heightProperty());
            }
            @Override
            protected Dimension2D computeValue() {
                System.out.println("Dimensions computed");
                return new Dimension2D(stage.widthProperty().doubleValue(), stage.heightProperty().doubleValue());
            }
        };
    }

    private void expensiveQuickCalculation(Dimension2D d) {
        System.out.println("-=< EXPENSIVE CALCULATION >=-");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }
}

An expensive, slow operation

In contrast to the case above, the operation is slow. We do not want to block the UI thread, so we use a javafx.concurrent.Service. The slow operation is emulated with a Thread.sleep(), so watch the console and be patient :)

import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.beans.InvalidationListener;
import javafx.beans.Observable;
import javafx.beans.binding.ObjectBinding;
import javafx.beans.property.ObjectProperty;
import javafx.beans.property.SimpleObjectProperty;
import javafx.concurrent.Service;
import javafx.concurrent.Task;
import javafx.event.ActionEvent;
import javafx.event.EventHandler;
import javafx.geometry.Dimension2D;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.Button;
import javafx.scene.layout.StackPane;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

public class ExpensiveSlowCalculationExample extends Application
{
    private static class SlowCalculationTask extends Task<Void>
    {
        private Dimension2D dimension;

        public SlowCalculationTask(Dimension2D dimension) {
            this.dimension = dimension;
        }

        @Override
        protected Void call() throws Exception {
            expensiveSlowCalculation();
            if( !isCancelled() ) {
                /////////////////////////////////////
                //        UPDATE STATE HERE        //
                // I would use Platform.runLater() //
                /////////////////////////////////////
                System.out.println("-=< UPDATING STATE >=-");
            }
            return null;
        }

        private void expensiveSlowCalculation() {
            System.out.println("-=< EXPENSIVE SLOW CALCULATION STARTED " + dimension + ">=-");
            try {
                Thread.sleep(5000);
                System.out.println("-=< EXPENSIVE SLOW CALCULATION DONE >=-");
            }
            catch (InterruptedException e) {
                if( isCancelled() ) System.out.println("-=< EXPENSIVE SLOW CALCULATION *CANCELLED* >=-");
                else throw new RuntimeException(e);
            }
        }
    }

    private static class SlowCalculationService extends Service<Void>
    {
        private ObjectProperty<Dimension2D> dimensions = new SimpleObjectProperty<>();
        public void setDimensions(Dimension2D dimensions) { this.dimensions.set(dimensions); }

        @Override
        protected Task<Void> createTask() {
            return new SlowCalculationTask(dimensions.get());
        }
    }



    private SlowCalculationService calculationService;


    @Override
    public void start(final Stage primaryStage) {
        primaryStage.setTitle("Lazy Example");

        Button btn = new Button();
        btn.setText("Manipulate");
        btn.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
            @Override public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
                //////////////////////////////////
                // DIMENSIONS MANIPULATION HERE //
                //////////////////////////////////
                primaryStage.setHeight(150);
                primaryStage.setWidth(150);
            }
        });

        StackPane root = new StackPane();
        root.getChildren().add(btn);
        primaryStage.setScene(new Scene(root, 300, 250));
        primaryStage.show();


        final ObjectBinding<Dimension2D> stageDimBinding = makeWindowDimensionsBinding(primaryStage);
        stageDimBinding.addListener(new InvalidationListener() {
            @Override public void invalidated(Observable observable) {
                System.out.println("---> Dimensions INVALIDATED");
                startService(stageDimBinding.get());
            }
        });
    }

    private ObjectBinding<Dimension2D> makeWindowDimensionsBinding(final Stage stage) {
        return new ObjectBinding<Dimension2D>() {
            {
                bind(stage.widthProperty(), stage.heightProperty());
            }
            @Override
            protected Dimension2D computeValue() {
                System.out.println("Dimensions computed");
                return new Dimension2D(stage.widthProperty().doubleValue(), stage.heightProperty().doubleValue());
            }
        };
    }

    private void startService(Dimension2D d) {
        if( calculationService == null ) calculationService = new SlowCalculationService();
        calculationService.setDimensions(d);
        calculationService.restart();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }
}

Test

Start the app and press the button. The messages "EXPENSIVE SLOW CALCULATION STARTED", "EXPENSIVE SLOW CALCULATION DONE" appear once, despite the fact that the operation depends on both width and height.

Then manually resize the window. You will inevitably get more "EXPENSIVE SLOW CALCULATION STARTED" messages. But all of those operations will get cancelled and only the last will be allowed to complete.

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