15

I am very new to Python. I know that this has already been asked, and I apologise, but the difference in this new situation is that spaces between strings are not equal. I have a file, named coord, that contains the following space delimited strings:

   1  C       6.00    0.000000000    1.342650315    0.000000000
   2  C       6.00    0.000000000   -1.342650315    0.000000000
   3  C       6.00    2.325538562    2.685300630    0.000000000
   4  C       6.00    2.325538562   -2.685300630    0.000000000
   5  C       6.00    4.651077125    1.342650315    0.000000000
   6  C       6.00    4.651077125   -1.342650315    0.000000000
   7  C       6.00   -2.325538562    2.685300630    0.000000000
   8  C       6.00   -2.325538562   -2.685300630    0.000000000
   9  C       6.00   -4.651077125    1.342650315    0.000000000
  10  C       6.00   -4.651077125   -1.342650315    0.000000000
  11  H       1.00    2.325538562    4.733763602    0.000000000
  12  H       1.00    2.325538562   -4.733763602    0.000000000
  13  H       1.00   -2.325538562    4.733763602    0.000000000
  14  H       1.00   -2.325538562   -4.733763602    0.000000000
  15  H       1.00    6.425098097    2.366881801    0.000000000
  16  H       1.00    6.425098097   -2.366881801    0.000000000
  17  H       1.00   -6.425098097    2.366881801    0.000000000
  18  H       1.00   -6.425098097   -2.366881801    0.000000000

Please, note the spaces before the start of each string in the first column. So I have tried the following in order of converting it to csv:

with open('coord') as infile, open('coordv', 'w') as outfile:
    outfile.write(infile.read().replace("  ", ", "))

# Unneeded columns are deleted from the csv

input = open('coordv', 'rb')
output = open('coordcsvout', 'wb')
writer = csv.writer(output)
for row in csv.reader(input):
    if row:
        writer.writerow(row)
input.close()
output.close()

with open("coordcsvout","rb") as source:
    rdr= csv.reader( source )
    with open("coordbarray","wb") as result:
        wtr= csv.writer(result)
        for r in rdr:
            wtr.writerow( (r[5], r[6], r[7]) )

When I run the script, I get the following for the coordv in the very first part of the script, which is of course very wrong:

,  1, C, , ,  6.00, , 0.000000000, , 1.342650315, , 0.000000000
,  2, C, , ,  6.00, , 0.000000000,  -1.342650315, , 0.000000000
,  3, C, , ,  6.00, , 2.325538562, , 2.685300630, , 0.000000000
,  4, C, , ,  6.00, , 2.325538562,  -2.685300630, , 0.000000000
,  5, C, , ,  6.00, , 4.651077125, , 1.342650315, , 0.000000000
,  6, C, , ,  6.00, , 4.651077125,  -1.342650315, , 0.000000000
,  7, C, , ,  6.00,  -2.325538562, , 2.685300630, , 0.000000000
,  8, C, , ,  6.00,  -2.325538562,  -2.685300630, , 0.000000000
,  9, C, , ,  6.00,  -4.651077125, , 1.342650315, , 0.000000000
, 10, C, , ,  6.00,  -4.651077125,  -1.342650315, , 0.000000000
, 11, H, , ,  1.00, , 2.325538562, , 4.733763602, , 0.000000000
, 12, H, , ,  1.00, , 2.325538562,  -4.733763602, , 0.000000000
, 13, H, , ,  1.00,  -2.325538562, , 4.733763602, , 0.000000000
, 14, H, , ,  1.00,  -2.325538562,  -4.733763602, , 0.000000000
, 15, H, , ,  1.00, , 6.425098097, , 2.366881801, , 0.000000000
, 16, H, , ,  1.00, , 6.425098097,  -2.366881801, , 0.000000000
, 17, H, , ,  1.00,  -6.425098097, , 2.366881801, , 0.000000000
, 18, H, , ,  1.00,  -6.425098097,  -2.366881801, , 0.000000000

I have tried different possibilities in .replace without any success, and so far I haven't found any source of information on how I could do this. What would be the best way to get a comma-separated values from this coord file? What I'm interested is in using then the csv module in python to choose columns 4:6 and finally use numpy to import them as follows:

from numpy import genfromtxt
cocmatrix = genfromtxt('input', delimiter=',')

I'd be very glad if somebody could help me with this problem.

4
  • 2
    sed -r 's/^\s+//;s/\s+/,/g' coord Nov 3, 2013 at 23:45
  • 1
    If the sole purpose is just to convert from one type to another, bash script would be easy, right?
    – Ananta
    Nov 3, 2013 at 23:48
  • I know how to use sed, awk, bash scripting, etc. However, my purpose is not only to convert from one type file to another. I'm processing the output file from a quantum chemistry program to do some operations in order to automatize later lots of calculations based on considering the center of charges of localized molecular orbitals.
    – muammar
    Nov 4, 2013 at 0:24
  • It looks like a fixed width file (fields in set position). Here is question on fixed widths: stackoverflow.com/questions/4914008/…, alternatively you could use slicing to split it up stackoverflow.com/questions/509211/pythons-slice-notation Nov 4, 2013 at 3:10

8 Answers 8

15

You can use csv:

import csv

with open(ur_infile) as fin, open(ur_outfile, 'w') as fout:
    o=csv.writer(fout)
    for line in fin:
        o.writerow(line.split())
2
  • 1
    Note that the .strip() is superfluous here; line.split() already does that.
    – DSM
    Nov 3, 2013 at 23:39
  • @thewolf getting an extra empty row for each row printed (otherwise works great)...any idea why this could be happening?
    – Chris
    Feb 25, 2017 at 17:56
8

You can use python pandas, I have written your data to data.csv:

import pandas as pd
>>> df = pd.read_csv('data.csv',sep='\s+',header=None)
>>> df
     0  1  2         3         4  5
0    1  C  6  0.000000  1.342650  0
1    2  C  6  0.000000 -1.342650  0
2    3  C  6  2.325539  2.685301  0
3    4  C  6  2.325539 -2.685301  0
4    5  C  6  4.651077  1.342650  0
5    6  C  6  4.651077 -1.342650  0
...

The great thing about this is to access the underlying numpy array you can use df.values:

>>> type(df.values)
<type 'numpy.ndarray'>

To save the data frame with comma delimiters:

>>> df.to_csv('data_out.csv',header=None)

Pandas is a great library for managing large amounts of data, as a bonus it works well with numpy. There is also a very good chance that this will be much faster then using the csv module.

7

replace your first bit with this. it's not super pretty but it will give you a csv format.

with open('coord') as infile, open('coordv', 'w') as outfile:
    for line in infile:
        outfile.write(" ".join(line.split()).replace(' ', ','))
        outfile.write(",") # trailing comma shouldn't matter

if you want the outfile to have everything on different lines you could add outfile.write("\n") at the end of the for loop, but i dont think your code that follows this will work with it like that.

5
  • 2
    Have you actually tested that code? The input file has sequences of multiple spaces which translates to sequences of empty fields i.e. ['', '', '', '1', '', 'C', '', '', '', '', '', '', '6.00', '', '', '', '0.000000000', '', '', '', '1.342650315', '', '', '', '0.000000000'] for the first row. -1 because it doesn't work. Nov 3, 2013 at 23:49
  • i know it does, which is why i suggested the newline character.
    – j011y
    Nov 5, 2013 at 4:43
  • Sorry, I missed that, although I thought that the intent of the author was clear. I've removed the -1. Nov 5, 2013 at 19:52
  • I wanted to add that this answer is much more general. I am now instead using this as answer for this question.
    – muammar
    Jan 5, 2014 at 16:04
  • I have same problem, but the values has spaces too.
    – ira
    Apr 13 at 8:41
1
>>> a = 'cah  1  C       6.00    0.000000000    1.342650315    0.000000000'
=>  a = 'cah  1  C       6.00    0.000000000    1.342650315    0.000000000'

>>> a.split()
=>  ['cah', '1', 'C', '6.00', '0.000000000', '1.342650315', '0.000000000']

>>> ','.join(a.split())
=>  'cah,1,C,6.00,0.000000000,1.342650315,0.000000000'

>>> ['"' + x + '"' for x in a.split()]
=>  ['"cah"', '"1"', '"C"', '"6.00"', '"0.000000000"', '"1.342650315"', '"0.000000000"']

>>> ','.join(['"' + x + '"' for x in a.split()]
=>  '"cah","1","C","6.00","0.000000000","1.342650315","0.000000000"'
0
1

for converting "space" to ","

only fill the filename to what you want

with open('filename') as infile, open('output', 'w') as outfile:
    outfile.write(infile.read().replace(" ", ","))

for converting "," to "Space"

with open('filename') as infile, open('output', 'w') as outfile: outfile.write(infile.read().replace(",", " "))

0

Why not to read a file line by line? Split a line into a list then rejoin a list with ','.

1
0

The csv module is good, or here's a way to do it without:

#!/usr/local/cpython-3.3/bin/python

with open('input-file.csv', 'r') as infile, open('output.csv', 'w') as outfile:
    for line in infile:
        fields = line.split()
        outfile.write('{}\n'.format(','.join(fields)))
0

For Merging Multiple text files in one CSV

import csv
import os
for x in range(0,n):            #n = max number of files 
    with open('input{}.txt'.format(x)) as fin, open('output.csv', 'a') as fout:
       csv_output=csv.writer(fout)
       for line in fin:
            csv_output.writerow(line.split())

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