18
class A
{
   protected:
    string word;
};

class B
{
   protected:
    string word;
};

class Derived: public A, public B
{

};

How would the accessibility of the variable word be affected in Derived? How would I resolve it?

  • 4
    Note that apart from the good answers below, it is always a good policy to avoid this kind of name clashes as much as possible. – Daniel Daranas Nov 4 '13 at 16:26
31

It will be ambiguous, and you'll get a compilation error saying that.

You'll need to use the right scope to use it:

 class Derived: public A, public B
{
    Derived()
    {
        A::word = "A!";
        B::word = "B!!";
    }
};
22

You can use the using keyword to tell the compiler which version to use:

class Derived : public A, public B
{
protected:
    using A::word;
};

This tells the compiler that the Derived class has a protected member word, which will be an alias to A::word. Then whenever you use the unqualified identifier word in the Derived class, it will mean A::word. If you want to use B::word you have to fully qualify the scope.

  • Don't you have to say what has to be "used" for A::word? or is using A::word alone really enough? – dhein Nov 4 '13 at 8:36
  • @Zaibis That's enough really, it makes Derived::word an alias of A::word, basically. – Some programmer dude Nov 4 '13 at 8:41
  • I'm beliving you, I just asked as I'm not that used to c++ as I'm with C. ;) – dhein Nov 4 '13 at 8:42
  • 3
    using A::word in a full sentence would be: "Compiler, when I talk about word in the following clause, I really mean A::word" – Henno Nov 4 '13 at 9:31
5

Your class Derived will have two variables, B::word and A::word Outside of Derived you can access them like this (if you change their access to public):

Derived c;
c.A::word = "hi";
c.B::word = "happy";

Attempting to access c.word will lead to an error, since there is no field with the name word, but only A::word and B::word.

Inside Derived they behave like regular fields, again, with the names A::var and B::var also mentioned in other answers.

3

When accessing word in the class of Derived, you had to declare

class Derived: public A, public B
{
    Derived()
    {
       A::word = X;
       //or
       B::word = x;
    }
};

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