122

I have a large numpy array that I need to manipulate so that each element is changed to either a 1 or 0 if a condition is met (will be used as a pixel mask later). There are about 8 million elements in the array and my current method takes too long for the reduction pipeline:

for (y,x), value in numpy.ndenumerate(mask_data): 

    if mask_data[y,x]<3: #Good Pixel
        mask_data[y,x]=1
    elif mask_data[y,x]>3: #Bad Pixel
        mask_data[y,x]=0

Is there a numpy function that would speed this up?

2
  • 1
    What do you want to happen if mask_data[y,x]==3?
    – DSM
    Nov 4, 2013 at 11:35
  • Good point, that would still be a bad pixel. I'll change the condition to if mask_data[y,x]>=3:
    – ChrisFro
    Nov 4, 2013 at 11:40

6 Answers 6

165
>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.random.randint(0, 5, size=(5, 4))
>>> a
array([[4, 2, 1, 1],
       [3, 0, 1, 2],
       [2, 0, 1, 1],
       [4, 0, 2, 3],
       [0, 0, 0, 2]])
>>> b = a < 3
>>> b
array([[False,  True,  True,  True],
       [False,  True,  True,  True],
       [ True,  True,  True,  True],
       [False,  True,  True, False],
       [ True,  True,  True,  True]], dtype=bool)
>>> 
>>> c = b.astype(int)
>>> c
array([[0, 1, 1, 1],
       [0, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 1, 1],
       [0, 1, 1, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1]])

You can shorten this with:

>>> c = (a < 3).astype(int)
2
  • 2
    how to make this happen with specific columns without ever slicing out some columns and then assigning back again? for example, only elements in columns [2, 3] should change value when conditions met, while other columns will not change no matter conditions are met or not.
    – kuixiong
    Jul 20, 2019 at 9:42
  • True, but only for the case of zeros and ones. See more general answer below (at efficiency cost)
    – borgr
    May 17, 2020 at 13:29
121
>>> a = np.random.randint(0, 5, size=(5, 4))
>>> a
array([[0, 3, 3, 2],
       [4, 1, 1, 2],
       [3, 4, 2, 4],
       [2, 4, 3, 0],
       [1, 2, 3, 4]])
>>> 
>>> a[a > 3] = -101
>>> a
array([[   0,    3,    3,    2],
       [-101,    1,    1,    2],
       [   3, -101,    2, -101],
       [   2, -101,    3,    0],
       [   1,    2,    3, -101]])
>>>

See, eg, Indexing with boolean arrays.

3
  • 4
    great stuff, thanks! If you want to refer to the value you change you can use something like a[a > 3] = -101+a[a > 3].
    – pexmar
    Jul 7, 2017 at 17:12
  • 3
    @pexmar Though if you do a[a > 3] = -101+a[a > 3] instead of a[a > 3] += -101 you will most likely face memory leakage. Dec 14, 2018 at 11:14
  • 2
    how do you refer to the value you change as pexmar asked??
    – Juan
    Aug 16, 2019 at 7:22
43

The quickest (and most flexible) way is to use np.where, which chooses between two arrays according to a mask(array of true and false values):

import numpy as np
a = np.random.randint(0, 5, size=(5, 4))
b = np.where(a<3,0,1)
print('a:',a)
print()
print('b:',b)

which will produce:

a: [[1 4 0 1]
 [1 3 2 4]
 [1 0 2 1]
 [3 1 0 0]
 [1 4 0 1]]

b: [[0 1 0 0]
 [0 1 0 1]
 [0 0 0 0]
 [1 0 0 0]
 [0 1 0 0]]
2
  • 3
    what will be the best way if I don't want to replace with anything if condition is not met ?i.e. Only replace with the provide value when condition is met, if not leave the original number as it is.... Jul 29, 2020 at 10:56
  • 2
    to replace all values in a, which are smaller then 3 and keep the rest as it is, use a[a<3] = 0 Jul 29, 2020 at 12:52
3

You can create your mask array in one step like this

mask_data = input_mask_data < 3

This creates a boolean array which can then be used as a pixel mask. Note that we haven't changed the input array (as in your code) but have created a new array to hold the mask data - I would recommend doing it this way.

>>> input_mask_data = np.random.randint(0, 5, (3, 4))
>>> input_mask_data
array([[1, 3, 4, 0],
       [4, 1, 2, 2],
       [1, 2, 3, 0]])
>>> mask_data = input_mask_data < 3
>>> mask_data
array([[ True, False, False,  True],
       [False,  True,  True,  True],
       [ True,  True, False,  True]], dtype=bool)
>>> 
1
  • 1
    Yep. If the OP really wants 0s and 1s, he could use .astype(int) or *1, but an array of True and False is just as good as it is.
    – DSM
    Nov 4, 2013 at 11:43
1

I was a noob with Numpy, and the answers above where not straight to the point to modify in place my array, so I'm posting what I came up with:

import numpy as np

arr = np.array([[[10,20,30,255],[40,50,60,255]],
                [[70,80,90,255],[100,110,120,255]],
                [[170,180,190,255],[230,240,250,255]]])

# Change 1:
# Set every value to 0 if first element is smaller than 80 
arr[arr[:,:,0] < 80] = 0

print('Change 1:',arr,'\n')

# Change 2:
# Set every value to 1 if bigger than 180 and smaller than 240
# OR if equal to 170
arr[(arr > 180) & (arr < 240) | (arr == 170)] = 1

print('Change 2:',arr)

This produces:

Change 1: [[[  0   0   0   0]
  [  0   0   0   0]]

 [[  0   0   0   0]
  [100 110 120 255]]

 [[170 180 190 255]
  [230 240 250 255]]] 

Change 2: [[[  0   0   0   0]
  [  0   0   0   0]]

 [[  0   0   0   0]
  [100 110 120 255]]

 [[  1 180   1 255]
  [  1 240 250 255]]]

This way you can add tons of conditions like 'Change 2' and set values accordingly.

-5

I am not sure I understood your question, but if you write:

mask_data[:3, :3] = 1
mask_data[3:, 3:] = 0

This will make all values of mask data whose x and y indexes are less than 3 to be equal to 1 and all rest to be equal to 0

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