I am trying to create a function to test if a given integer is a prime number, I tried using the following:

tpn <- function(prime.num){

    if(prime.num==2){
        print("PRIME")
    } else {

    if(prime.num%%(2:(prime.num-1))!=0){
        print("PRIME")

    } else { 
        print("NOT PRIME")

}}}

This doesn't work, although I cant understand why. I am checking to see if the given number can be divided by any of the integers up to this number with no remainders. If it cant, then the number is prime.

Another solution I found was:

tpn <- function(pn){

    if(sum(pn/1:pn==pn%/%1:pn)==2)
            print("prime")

}

This works. Although, I cant get my head around what sum(pn/1:pn == pn%/%1:pn) == 2 is actually testing for.

  • Have you tried breaking it down into pieces? If you did, you'd see that if only accepts a single argument, for one thing (in your first example). In the second one, a few parentheses would help, so go to the help page ?Syntax to see which operations happen first. – Carl Witthoft Nov 4 '13 at 12:27
  • Perhaps a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/3789968/321622 or stackoverflow.com/q/3858636/321622 – John Nov 4 '13 at 12:36
up vote 19 down vote accepted

A number a is divisible by a number b if the result of the division a / b is equal to the result of the integer division a %/% b. Any integer pn can be divided by at least two numbers: 1 and pn. Prime numbers are those than can only be divided by those two. Breaking out the code:

  1. pn / 1:pn are the results of the divisions by 1, 2, ..., pn
  2. pn %/% 1:pn are the results of the integer divisions by 1, 2, ..., pn
  3. sum(pn / 1:pn == pn %/% 1:pn) are how many of these are equal, i.e., the number of integer divisors of pn. If this number is 2, you have a prime.

What was wrong with your code: if needs to test if something is TRUE or FALSE but you were passing it a whole vector. Also, your logic was wrong. It should have been:

is.prime <- function(num) {
   if (num == 2) {
      TRUE
   } else if (any(num %% 2:(num-1) == 0)) {
      FALSE
   } else { 
      TRUE
   }
}

And once you've settled on returning a logical, you can make your code a lot shorter:

is.prime <- function(n) n == 2L || all(n %% 2L:max(2,floor(sqrt(n))) != 0)

(which incorporates @Carl's comment about not checking all numbers.)

  • 3
    Well, so much for turning my comment into an answer :-( . FWIW, I'll mention that testing 2:prime.num-1 is incredibly wasteful, as you can stop at roughly sqrt(prime.num) – Carl Witthoft Nov 4 '13 at 12:29
  • Thank you so much, you made this very clear! if only you could be my R lecturer :D – user2952367 Nov 4 '13 at 12:37
  • 4
    So I know this is way late, but the shorter version says that 3 is not prime because floor(sqrt(n)) in this case is 1. – raptortech97 Aug 7 '14 at 17:09
  • 1
    @rawr IMO 1 is a prime. I don't care what mathmos say :) – geotheory Apr 15 '17 at 23:22
  • 2
    @geotheory I appreciate your boldness – rawr Apr 15 '17 at 23:24

I just tried the is.prime code example. But with this 3 is not prime ;o)

The improved version uses ceiling instead of the floor operation.

is.prime <- function(n) n == 2L || all(n %% 2L:ceiling(sqrt(n)) != 0)

Best!

You may also use the isprime() function in the matlab package. It works also with vector arguments:

library(matlab)

as.logical(isprime(7))
as.logical(isprime(42))

#> as.logical(isprime(7))
#[1] TRUE
#> as.logical(isprime(42))
#[1] FALSE

A regular expression to find prime numbers

is.prime <- function(x) {
  x <- abs(as.integer(x))
  !grepl('^1?$|^(11+?)\\1+$', strrep('1', x))
}

(-100:100)[is.prime(-100:100)]
# [1]  -97 -89 -83 -79 -73 -71 -67 -61 -59 -53 -47 -43 -41 -37 -31 -29 -23 -19 -17 -13 -11  -7  -5  -3  -2
# [26]   2   3   5   7  11  13  17  19  23  29  31  37  41  43  47  53  59  61  67  71  73  79  83  89  97

http://diswww.mit.edu/bloom-picayune.mit.edu/perl/10138


Or if you take all the integers from 1 to x, the number which divide with no remainder should be 2: 1 and x

is.prime <- function(x)
  vapply(x, function(y) sum(y / 1:y == y %/% 1:y), integer(1L)) == 2L

(1:100)[is.prime(1:100)]
# [1]  2  3  5  7 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47 53 59 61 67 71 73 79 83 89 97

I knew the regex would be slowest, but it's still my favorite

is.prime <- function(x)
  vapply(x, function(y) sum(y / 1:y == y %/% 1:y), integer(1L)) == 2L

is.prime_regex <- function(x) {
  x <- abs(as.integer(x))
  !grepl('^1?$|^(11+?)\\1+$', strrep('1', x))
}

is.prime_Seily  <- function(n)
  vapply(n, function(y)
    y == 2L || all(y %% 2L:ceiling(sqrt(y)) != 0), logical(1L))

is.prime_flodel <- function(n)
  vapply(n, function(y)
    y == 2L || all(y %% 2L:max(2,floor(sqrt(y))) != 0), logical(1L))

x <- 1:1000

library('microbenchmark')
microbenchmark(
  is.prime(x),
  is.prime_regex(x),
  is.prime_Seily(x),
  is.prime_flodel(x),
  unit = 'relative'
)

# Unit: relative
#               expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq        max neval cld
#        is.prime(x)  8.593971  8.606353  8.805690  8.892905  9.724452 21.9886734   100  b 
#  is.prime_regex(x) 84.572928 86.200415 76.413036 86.895956 85.117796 25.7106323   100   c
#  is.prime_Seily(x)  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.000000  1.0000000   100 a  
# is.prime_flodel(x)  1.146212  1.147971  1.144839  1.146119  1.163302  0.9085948   100 a  
  • 1
    Nice benchmark. I guess the test should be on large numbers, not just a lot of numbers. I posted an alternate benchmark over here: chat.stackoverflow.com/transcript/message/36663729#36663729 I added a couple other methods, cheating by using the compiler package and storing results in the function environment. – Frank Apr 17 '17 at 16:26
  • @Frank very true. the benchmark timings are very weird. at least in yours, they go in the same (wrong) direction, but in the regex benchmark in the answer, min is less than Q1 but Q1 is larger than mean but only slightly less than median which is higher than upper quartile and the maxis the lowest.. no idea whats going on there – rawr Apr 17 '17 at 17:06
  • Yeah, I guess min vs max isn't meaningful with unit = 'relative', which apparently converts each column independently. In my benchmark, it makes sense that max should be super high since it does a lot of work for the first iteration... but then min is very low since it can rest on its laurels / memoised computations. – Frank Apr 17 '17 at 17:28

I am going to provide you with 2 easy functions. The second one displays n-th prime number. EDIT* (typo)

PrimeNumber <- function(n){
#Eratosthenes 
#Return all prime numbers up to n (based on the sieve of Eratosthenes)
    if (n >= 2) {
      sieve <- seq(2, n)
      primes <- c()

      for (i in seq(2, n)) {
        if (any(sieve == i)) {
          primes <- c(primes, i)
          sieve <- c(sieve[(sieve %% i) != 0], i)
        }
      }
      return(primes)
    } else {
      stop("Input value of n should be at least 2.")
    }
}

testScript <- function(n){
i=3
v=c(2)
while (length(v)<=n-1){

      if (all((i%%v[v<ceiling(sqrt(i))])!=0)){ 
        v=c(v,i)
      }
    i=i+2;
  }
  return(v)
}

Here is one more method to find prime number using simple concept

is.prime <- function(n){
 if (n == 2){  # finds the square root of number and assign to var 'i'
  print('number is prime')
 }
 else if (n > 2){
 i <- sqrt(n)   # finds the square root of number and assign to var 'i'
 i <- round(i, digits = 1) # if square root generates decimals, round it to one place
 vec <- c(2:i) #creating vector to load numbers from 2 to 'i'
 d <- n %% (vec) #dividing each number generated by vector by the input number 'n'
 if ( 0 %in% d){ # check to see if any of the result of division is 0
  print('number is not prime') #if any of the result of division is 0, number is not prime
 }
 else{ 
   print('number is prime')
 }
 }
}




is.prime(2)
[1] "number is prime"

is.prime(131) #calling the function with the desired number
[1] "number is prime"

is.prime(237)
[1] "number is not prime"
  • I see many Interview question asked to check if a number is prime without using any inbuilt function, so here you go. – Sugand Anand Dec 6 '17 at 8:38

This is the vectorized version with additional natural-number check:

is.prime <- Vectorize(function(n) ifelse(round(n) == n, 
                                  n == 2L || all(n %% 2L:max(2,floor(sqrt(n))) != 0), NA));

#> is.prime(c(1:10, 1.1))
# [1]  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE    NA
    is.primeornot <- function(n)
    {
      count = 0
      for( i in 2:n)
      {

        if(n%%i == 0){count = count+1}

      }
      p = c(n)
      if(count > 1){
        print(paste(n,"is not a prime number"))}
      else{print("prime")}
    }

Here is the most compact code I think:

is_prime <- function(n){
  ifelse(sum(n %% (1:n) == 0) > 2, FALSE, TRUE)
}

If you need to check whether each element of a vector of numbers is a prime number, you can do:

is_prime2 <- Vectorize(FUN = is_prime, vectorize.args = "n")

Now is_prime2() works with vectors.

  • 1
    Even more compact would be is_prime <- function(n) sum(n %% (1:n) == 0) <= 2 ;-) – Daniel Nov 1 '17 at 20:34
  • @Daniel Very nicely done! – SavedByJESUS Feb 8 at 7:22

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