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I am writing an application using java JDBC that queries and inserts data into an Oracle database.

I'm using the SimpleDriverDataSource from springframework API to implement the standard JDBC DataSource Inteface.

here is part of my code

dataSource = new SimpleDriverDataSource();
dataSource.setDriverClass(Class.forName(credentials.getDriverClass()));

I'm trying to keep the code independent of DriverClass used, and I know that class.forName() returns a class object for the class string name.

The problem is that I'm getting a compilation error saying:

the method setDriverClass(Class<? extends Driver>) in the type SimpleDriverDataSource is not applicable for the arguments (Class<capture#1-of ?>

I don't really understand what these symbols mean, or what is causing the error?

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credentials is an object of bean class Credentials that has setters and getters to get the user, pass etc. And getDriverClass() returns a String "Oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver" – ssayyed Nov 4 '13 at 15:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The SimpleDriverDataSource#setDriverClass(Class) is implemented as

public void setDriverClass(Class<? extends Driver> driverClass) {
    this.driver = BeanUtils.instantiateClass(driverClass);
}

So it is expecting a Class object of a type that is a subtype of Driver.

The Class.forName(String) method is implemented as

public static Class<?> forName(String className)
            throws ClassNotFoundException {
    return forName0(className, true, ClassLoader.getCallerClassLoader());
}

In other words it returns a Class<?> object, ie. a Class object of any type, not necessarily one that is a subtype of Driver. Therefore the declared type of the returned object is not a valid argument to the setDriverClass() method.

One solution is to instantiate your Driver class yourself and use the setDriver(Driver) method instead

Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(credentials.getDriverClass());
Object driver = BeanUtils.instantiateClass(clazz);
dataSource.setDriver((Driver) driver);

Note that the above will throw a ClassCastException at runtime if the class you try to instantiate is not a subtype of Driver.

Alternatively, as suggested by BalusC you can cast the value returned by Class.forName()

SimpleDriverDataSource dataSource = new SimpleDriverDataSource();
dataSource.setDriverClass((Class<Driver>)Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver"));

Adding some @SuppressWarnings if you don't like IDE warnings.

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1  
You could also just cast on Class<Driver> before passing to setDriverClass() (with a @SuppressWarnings if necessary). – BalusC Nov 4 '13 at 15:30

This is a little trick for Java Generics that's worth knowing.

The problem happens when you are dealing with type parameters that you know are consistent, but which are not explicit in your code. This is common if you are processing a not-completely-typed collection.

To make things clearer, I'll use the following example: Consider a system that transfers various values from one place to another (perhaps it is a scheduler sending messages of different types within a system).

We might have an interface that can both provide and receive certain message types:

public interface Connection<Type>
{
  Type read();
  void write(Type value);
}

And our scheduler might look something like this:

class Scheduler
{
  public void process(Collection<Connection<?>> cnxs)
  {
    for (Connection<?> cns: cnxs) {
      cnx.write(cnx.read);
    }
  }
}

(Note that is shorthand for and we use it here because the cnxs collection contains a Connections with a variety of different type parameters).

Unfortunately that won't compile! The error given be Eclipse with Java 1.6 is "The method write(capture#2-of ?) in the type Connection is not applicable for the arguments (capture#3-of ?)".

The reason this won't compile is that the type parameter for the value being returned by the Connection and the type parameter for the value it will receive are being treated separately. Each is being treated as "capture-of ?" which means "some subclass of Object". And the compiler is then (understandably) saying "I can't send 'subclass X of Object' to a method that expects 'subclass Y of Object' because I don't know if they are the same subclass".

To make this work we need to introduce the common type parameter explicitly. Unfortunately the following code, or something like it, doesn't work (as far as I can tell). There is no way to introduce a type parameter in the middle of a block of code (what we really want here is better support for polymorphism):

class Scheduler
{
  public void process(Collection<Connection<?>> cnxs)
  {
    // syntax error!
    for (<E> Connection<E> cns: cnxs) {
      E value = cnx.read();
      cnx.write(value);
    }
  }
}

But what we can do is add a helper method that introduces a new type parameter:

class Scheduler
{
  public void process(Collection<Connection<?>> cnxs)
  {
    for (Connection<?> cnx: cnxs) {
      helper(cnx);
    }
  }
  private <E> void helper(Connection<E> cnx)
  {
    E value = cnx.read();
    cnx.write(value);
  }
}

This does what we want! The code validates, compiles, and runs.

In summary then: Sometimes you can "lose" an explicit generic type parameter (often because you are dealing with a collection of different types). You can re-introduce that type parameter by adding an extra helper method.

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