3

Trying to come up with a 'simple' regex to mask bits of text that look like they might contain account numbers.

In plain English:

  • any word containing a digit (or a train of such words) should be matched
  • leave the last 4 digits intact
  • replace all previous part of the matched string with four X's (xxxx)

So far

I'm using the following:

[\-0-9 ]+(?<m1>[\-0-9]{4})

replacing with

xxxx${m1}

But this misses on the last few samples below

sample data:

123456789
a123b456
a1234b5678
a1234 b5678
111 22 3333
this is a a1234 b5678 test string

Actual results

xxxx6789
a123b456
a1234b5678
a1234 b5678
xxxx3333
this is a a1234 b5678 test string

Expected results

xxxx6789
xxxxb456
xxxx5678
xxxx5678
xxxx3333
this is a xxxx5678 test string

Is such an arrangement possible with a regex replace?

I think I"m going to need some greediness and lookahead functionality, but I have zero experience in those areas.

  • I am sorry but I can't see the problem ? What are the wrong results you are getting ? – Ibrahim Najjar Nov 4 '13 at 19:32
  • 1
    @Sniffer I've added the actual results based on his patterns. – Tim S. Nov 4 '13 at 19:33
  • @TimS. ... thanks! – Brian Adkins Nov 4 '13 at 19:35
  • Are your expected results right? xxxxb456 doesn't look like it should be there. – abc123 Nov 4 '13 at 19:42
2

I don't think that regex is the best way to solve this problem and that's why I am posting this answer. For so complex situations, building the corresponding regex is too difficult and, what is worse, its clarity and adaptability is much lower than a longer-code approach.

The code below these lines delivers the exact functionality you are after, it is clear enough and can be easily extended.

string input = "this is a a1234 b5678 test string";
string output = "";
string[] temp = input.Trim().Split(' ');
bool previousNum = false;
string tempOutput = "";
foreach (string word in temp)
{
    if (word.ToCharArray().Where(x => char.IsDigit(x)).Count() > 0)
    {
        previousNum = true;
        tempOutput = tempOutput + word;
    }
    else
    {
        if (previousNum)
        {
            if (tempOutput.Length >= 4) tempOutput = "xxxx" + tempOutput.Substring(tempOutput.Length - 4, 4);
            output = output + " " + tempOutput;
            previousNum = false;
        }
        output = output + " " + word;
    }
}
if (previousNum)
{
    if (tempOutput.Length >= 4) tempOutput = "xxxx" + tempOutput.Substring(tempOutput.Length - 4, 4);
    output = output + " " + tempOutput;
    previousNum = false;
}
  • One quick comment, where you say if (!previousNum) previousNum = true; you can reduce complexity by just saying previousNum = true; and removing the if statement. It will reduce the cyclomatic complexity by 1 for that statement – joe_coolish Nov 4 '13 at 20:06
  • 1
    @joe_coolish you are completely and absolutely right. I wrote the code quickly. – varocarbas Nov 4 '13 at 20:08
  • 1
    other than that, +1 for unwrapping the regex! – joe_coolish Nov 4 '13 at 20:08
  • @joe_coolish Thanks :) – varocarbas Nov 4 '13 at 20:09
  • I agree that straight regex is not the best way... But such was my quest – Brian Adkins Nov 7 '13 at 13:31
3

This works for your example:

var result = Regex.Replace(
    input,
    @"(?<!\b\w*\d\w*)(?<m1>\s?\b\w*\d\w*)+",
    m => "xxxx" + m.Value.Substring(Math.Max(0, m.Value.Length - 4)));

If you have a value like 111 2233 33, it will print xxxx3 33. If you want this to be free from spaces, you could turn the lambda into a multi-line statement that removes whitespace from the value.

To explain the regex pattern a bit, it's got a negative lookbehind, so it makes sure that the word behind it does not have a digit in it (with optional word characters around the digit). Then it's got the m1 portion, which looks for words with digits in them. The last four characters of this are grabbed via some C# code after the regex pattern resolves the rest.

2

Have you tried this:

.*(?<m1>[\d]{4})(?<m2>.*)

with replacement

xxxx${m1}${m2}

This produces

xxxx6789
xxxx5678
xxxx5678
xxxx3333
xxxx5678 test string

You are not going to get 'a123b456' to match ... until 'b' becomes a number. ;-)

  • 1
    This will replace the "This is a" in the last example – joe_coolish Nov 4 '13 at 19:41
  • At the time I wrote the answer his example also removed that. Since then the requirements changed ;-) – Dweeberly Nov 5 '13 at 15:28
  • lol, nice! "Hey, it was in the specs!" – joe_coolish Nov 5 '13 at 16:24
1

Here is my really quick attempt:

(\s|^)([a-z]*\d+[a-z,0-9]+\s)+

This will select all of those test cases. Now as for C# code, you'll need to check each match to see if there is a space at the beginning or end of the match sequence (e.g., the last example will have the space before and after selected)

here is the C# code to do the replace:

var redacted = Regex.Replace(record, @"(\s|^)([a-z]*\d+[a-z,0-9]+\s)+",
    match => "xxxx" /*new String("x",match.Value.Length - 4)*/ + 
    match.Value.Substring(Math.Max(0, match.Value.Length - 4)));

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