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Suppose you have users who are entering 10 digit phone numbers in several formats, such as

xxxxxxxxxx, 
xxx-xxx-xxxx, 
(xxx)xxx-xxxx. 

Write a regular expression for this language. Hint: you may want to separate different formats with a union ?

I came up with this expression

\d{10} U \d{3}-\d{3}-\d{4} U (\d{3})\d{3}-\d{4}

Any comments whether the above expression is correct for the problem?

  • Have you tried testing various input strings against the regular expression you have? – ajp15243 Nov 4 '13 at 21:18
  • No is there an online regex to check? – Shark Nov 4 '13 at 21:19
  • What is U - is that like | ? - and regex101.com is excellent. – Floris Nov 4 '13 at 21:20
  • yes it is union – Shark Nov 4 '13 at 21:30
  • U for union - is that your own invention, or is there a dialect of regex that uses that? – Floris Nov 4 '13 at 21:33
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See http://regex101.com/r/tK6mD4

(\d{10})|(\d{3}-\d{3}-\d{4})|(\(\d{3}\)\d{3}-\d{4})

Using | for "OR", no spaces, escaping the () with \.

Tested with

(888)123-3456     - match
8881231234        - match
888-123-1234      - match
888-1234567       - no match

Note - this expression matches exactly (and only) what you asked for. A good regex for "all valid phone numbers" is quite different - you can google that and will find a ton of answers.

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I would probably do something like this:

\(?\b[0-9]{3}\)?[-/\s]?[0-9]{3}[-. ]?[0-9]{4}\b

Which would catch all of these formats:

XXXXXXXXXX
XXX-XXX-XXXX
(XXX) XXX-XXXX
(XXX)XXX-XXXX
(XXX) XXX XXXX
XXX/XXX-XXXX
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From http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/advanced-regular-expression-tips-and-techniques/

/^(1[-\s.])?(\()?\d{3}(?(2)\))[-\s.]?\d{3}[-\s.]?\d{4}$/


    (1[-\s.])?  # optional '1-', '1.' or '1' 
    ( \( )?     # optional opening parenthesis 
    \d{3}       # the area code 
    (?(2) \) )  # if there was opening parenthesis, close it 
    [-\s.]?     # followed by '-' or '.' or space 
    \d{3}       # first 3 digits 
    [-\s.]?     # followed by '-' or '.' or space 
    \d{4}       # last 4 digits 

This is specifically for US phone numbers - so also takes into consideration country prefix.

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