5

What is exact function/purpose of * in front of _fact and how it can be equivalently written?

sub fact {
   my ($n) = @_;

   local *_fact = sub {
       my ($n, $prod) = @_;
       return $prod if $n == 0;
       return _fact($n-1, $n*$prod);
   };

   return _fact($n, 1);
}

fact($n);
11

Ideally, the author of the function would have liked to use

sub fact {
   my ($n) = @_;

   my $_fact; $_fact = sub {
       my ($n, $prod) = @_;
       return $prod if $n == 0;
       return $_fact->($n-1, $n*$prod);
   };

   return $_fact->($n, 1);
}

Unfortunately, that has a memory leak. The anon sub has a reference to $_fact, which holds a reference to the anonymous sub. $_fact would need to be cleared to break the reference on exit.

sub fact {
   my ($n) = @_;

   my $_fact;
   $_fact = sub {
       my ($n, $prod) = @_;
       return $prod if $n == 0;
       return $_fact->($n-1, $n*$prod);
   };

   my $rv;
   my $e = eval { $rv = $_fact->($n, 1); 1 } ? undef : ($@ || 'Unknown');
   $_fact = undef;
   die $e if $e
   return $rv;       
}

But that's UGLY! One way to avoid the problem is using a Y combinator. A much simpler way to avoid the problem is to store the code reference in a package variable instead of a lexical variable (since only lexical variables are captured by subs). This is what the code you posted does. Keep in mind that

*_fact = sub { ...  };

is basically a run-time version of

sub _fact { ... }

Both assign the sub to CODE slot of symbol _fact.

That said, 5.16 introduced a better fix:

use feature qw( current_sub );

sub fact {
   my ($n) = @_;

   my $_fact = sub {
       my ($n, $prod) = @_;
       return $prod if $n == 0;
       return __SUB__->($n-1, $n*$prod);
   };

   return $_fact->($n, 1);
}
  • 1
    saw Y combinator. clicked +1. – memowe Nov 4 '13 at 22:01
  • @ikegami could you explain why the eval portion is necessary? Is it just to prevent a thrown error from allowing memory to leak? – Nate Glenn Nov 14 '13 at 5:19
  • 1
    @Nate Glenn, Gotta break the memory cycle even on error (unless you know the program will exit anyway.) The eval is probably not needed here as I don't foresee any run-time error, but I included it because this is obviously a learning exercise. Using recursion for factorial in Perl is insanely wasteful. – ikegami Nov 14 '13 at 12:02
2

Check typeglob aliases

Example above should be written using anonymous subroutine/closure:

sub fact {
   my ($n) = @_;

   my $_fact;
   $_fact = sub {
       my ($n, $prod) = @_;
       return $prod if $n == 0;
       return __SUB__->($n-1, $n*$prod);
   };

   return $_fact->($n, 1);
}
  • "What is exact function/purpose of * in front of _fact?" – Michael Paulukonis Nov 4 '13 at 21:18
  • @ikegami how about codepad.org/80KSqye4 ? – Сухой27 Nov 4 '13 at 22:50
  • It doesn't leak, but it's a poor solution. It removes the tail recursion which was obviously a guiding factor in the design of the sub. $n ? $n * fact($n-1) : 1 would have sufficed otherwise. Eliminating tail recursion makes it inefficient everywhere. Changing the outer sub to end with my $rv = $_fact(...); undef $_fact; $rv would be more appropriate. – ikegami Nov 5 '13 at 0:24
  • I went a step further and added an eval. It's probably not needed here as I don't foresee any run-time error, but I included it because this is obviously a learning exercise. Using recursion for factorial in Perl is insanely wasteful. – ikegami Nov 5 '13 at 0:24
1

It appears that this is a funky attempt at creating a closure by assigning a code reference to the typeglob named _fact and then calling it pseudo-recursively. (note: a typeglob is the container for all variables with a particular name).

A virtually equivalent (and much more standard) way to write this would be:

sub fact {
   my ($n) = @_;

   my $_fact;

   $fact = sub { .... }; # Assigning code-ref to scalar variable.

   return $_fact->($n, 1); # Note the arrow syntax to deref the code-ref
}

...but, as was kindly pointed out, that has a memory leak in it... so, I say just dump the closure altogether and write it like so:

sub fact {
   my($n,$prod) = @_;

   return((defined $prod) ? (($n == 0) ? $prod : fact($n-1, $n * $prod)) : fact($n,1));
}

(remember, the only thing worse than infinite recursion is... infinite recursion)

  • @ikegami, actually, this code doesn't have a memory leak. Instead, $_fact is not accessible inside the sub, so it can't be used for recursive calls. – cjm Nov 4 '13 at 21:44
0

It's so called typeglob and is used to create table aliases. See perldoc reference for more info .

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