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If CORS is properly setup on a server to only allow a certain origins to access the server, is this enough to prevent XSRF attacks?

31

To be more specific, it is easy to make the mistake of thinking that if evil.com cannot make a request to good.com due to CORS then CSRF is prevented. There are two problems being overlooked, however:

  1. CORS is respected by the browsers only. That means Google Chrome will obey CORS and not let evil.com make a request to good.com. However, imagine someone builds a native app or whatever which has a form that POSTs things to your site. XSRF tokens are the only way to prevent that.

  2. Is it easy to overlook the fact that CORS is only for JS request. A regular form on evil.com that POSTs back to good.com will still work despite CORS.

For these reasons, CORS is not a good replacement for XSRF tokens. It is best to use both.

  • 11
    If I'm not mistaken, your first point may be invalid -- since CSRF attacks only work on browsers. – ineedahero Dec 14 '16 at 16:36
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    as @ineedahero mentions #1 doesn't apply here. and for #2, you can't set a fake Origin header on a form post, so if Origin is present and it's on your whitelist, seem like a CSRF is not possible. – Benja Jun 19 '17 at 13:17
  • #2 does apply. CORS only prevents the browser from making XHR requests. If the site changes the location URL (e.g. a native form POST or a link for a GET) then CORS does not apply. – Pace Aug 31 '17 at 15:57
  • @pace we're saying the same thing. I wrote "CORS is only for JS request" and you wrote "CORS only prevents ... XHR requests". – aleemb Oct 10 '17 at 6:44
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    Yes, sorry. I could have been more clear. I was disputing @Benja’s claim in the above comment. I agree with your answer @aleemb – Pace Oct 10 '17 at 10:46
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No!

CORS enables sharing between two domains where XSRF is attacking method that does not depend on CORS in anyway.

I don't understand what you mean by "CORS is properly setup" but when attacking with XSRF, browser don't ask for CORS headers on server.

CORS is not security :)

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    It should be put up in big bold letters: "CORS is not security!" CORS only specifies what types of cross-origin requests are allowed to your server. It shouldn't be a substitute for good security practices. – monsur Nov 5 '13 at 16:30
  • @monsur: done! I hope it will help... – confiq Nov 6 '13 at 7:56
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    Ha thanks! I was actually speaking generally, your answer was great. But thanks for updating anyway :) – monsur Nov 6 '13 at 19:02
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    I guess what I'm trying to get at is can anyone spoof an origin header? If so wouldn't CORS or the Same-Origin-Policy break down? – programmerdave Nov 7 '13 at 14:39
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    answer doesnt say why or how, XSRF/CSRF is to make a illegitimate request on user behalf. siteA calling siteB/logout for example. Strict CORS policy prevents cross site JS calls, so how come. – Muhammad Umer Oct 19 '17 at 6:35
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No.

The Same Origin Policy (which CORS allows you to punch selective holes through) prevents third party sites from masquerading as a user in order to read (private) data from another site.

A Cross Site Request Forgery attack is when a third party site masquerades as a user to submit data to another site (as that user). It doesn't need to read the response back.

  • But it could, right? CSRF-get's for instance <img src=victim.bank/check.png?account=...> to get a check photo from a vulnerable bank site, without generating origin headers or preflighted requests. [...] The photos will be displayed, and the attackers can get the photo data using Javascript and send them back. source, – Evan Carroll Apr 14 '15 at 18:11
  • Your assumption that CSRF attacks are limited to "submitted" data seems to be wrong. And, further, that CSRF couldn't remedy this situation is also wrong (though ymmv with even modern browsers), If the browser checks the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header in the response and refuses to display it, it will be an effective defense. (same source) – Evan Carroll Apr 14 '15 at 18:13
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    @EvanCarroll — In response to your first comment: Using an image like that can trigger a CSRF attack. CORS can't prevent that for the reasons described in this answer. The attacker can display the image to the user (which might be useful in phishing attacks) but they cannot make the browser send a copy of the image (or data extracted from the image) to the attacker (because the Same Origin Policy prevents it). Your source is wrong. – Quentin Apr 15 '15 at 8:38
  • @EvanCarroll — In response to your second comment: Data submitted to a server by embedding it in a query string of a URL that is loaded via an image tag is still submitted. "If the browser checks the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header" — No browser does that, so it isn't relevant in a discussion about authoring websites. "it will be an effective defense" — The Same Origin Policy is already an effective defence against other sites finding out information about what images a user has access to on a server. – Quentin Apr 15 '15 at 8:40
4

Maybe

Man this is a tough one, and it's far more complex than the others have provided for. So "maybe"

First, CORS is intended to "relax" same-origin-policy which is a default that prevents a specific type of CSRF attack. But, same-origin doesn't apply on all kinds of requests.

So the longer the session needs to time out and the more the user surfs around untrusted sites, the higher the risk is to pop onto one with a CSRF attack on it. Any tag which fires a request to an external resource can be used to perform a hidden CSRF attack – including images, link tags, some meta tags, embed and object tags and so on. Same goes for attributes which load background images or similar. You can even check if you site has been validated by someone if you replace the DTD file in the very header of the applications markup with a resource on your servers – that’s CSRF too. source

For an example of that, check this..

<img src=victim.bank/check.png?account=...>; to get a check photo from a vulnerable bank site, without generating origin headers or preflighted requests. [...] The photos will be displayed, and the attackers can get the photo data using Javascript and send them back. source

However, at least one source suggests that perhaps in the future web servers will return images with Access-Control-Allow-Origin (CORS) headers on images that will stop browsers from rendering the image. This will prevent CSRF-GET attacks of this sort..

If the browser checks the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header in the response and refuses to display it, it will be an effective defense. source

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    "the attackers can get the photo data using Javascript and send them back" — That is not true – Quentin Apr 15 '15 at 8:41
  • @Quentin sure it is.. stackoverflow.com/a/1041492/124486 – Evan Carroll Apr 15 '15 at 16:23
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    When I run that code, after replacing the URL with an image on a different origin, the browser console says: Uncaught SecurityError: Failed to execute 'getImageData' on 'CanvasRenderingContext2D': The canvas has been tainted by cross-origin data. So, no, it isn't possible because the Same Origin Policy kicks in. – Quentin Apr 15 '15 at 17:55
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    @Quentin Look at your network tab, it didn't prevent the request from being made, it only prevented you from accessing the data, but wouldn't prevent a modification from occurring if the request modified data. This should still be safeish since a GET request shouldn't modify data. – Pace Aug 31 '17 at 16:34
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Actually CORS does contribute to security. CORS helps a lot in relation to XSS and CSRF attacks between different hosts. If a website has an XSS vulnerability and the attacker wants to use it to send a malicious request to another webpage through xmlhttprequest, thanks to CORS he is not going to be able to.

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    CORS doesn't provide any additional security here. Before the CORS spec, the same xhr initiated request would have been rejected outright by the browser. – Ray Nicholus May 19 '14 at 20:50

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