5

For example, I have seen functions like this, which are handy to use:

myFunction(data).
  success(function() { // success! }).
  fail(function() { // fail! });

I can't see an obvious way how to implement that. Here is my sad attempt after looking at the Node.js docs:

var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter;
var testEmitter = function(x) {
  var e = new EventEmitter();

  if (x) {
    e.emit('success', 'got: ' + x);
  } else {
    e.emit('failure', 'no x passed')
  }

  return e;
}

Obviously, this won't work when you try to call it:

testEmitter('hello').
  success(console.log('success!')).
  failure(console.log('failure!'));

  // TypeError: Object #<EventEmitter> has no method 'success'

What's the best way to implement this pattern?

9

This can be "improved" to:

var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter;

var testEmitter = function(x) {
  var e = new EventEmitter();

  process.nextTick(function(){
    if (x) {
      e.emit('success', 'got: ' + x);
    } else {
      e.emit('failure', 'no x passed')
    }
   })

  var self = {};
  self.success = function(f) {
    e.on('success',f);
    return self;
  };
  self.failure = function(f) {
    e.on('failure',f);
    return self;
  };
  return self;
};

testEmitter("hello").success(function(results){
  console.log('success!',results);
}).failure(function(error){
  console.log('failure!' + error);
})
  • 1
    Sudsy got us 1/2 way there, lipp brought it home. – Lavamantis Nov 6 '13 at 18:41
2

How about this? I have used process.nextTick to simulate the async work that you want to do in your function.

var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter;

var testEmitter = function(x) {
  var e = new EventEmitter();

  process.nextTick(function(){
      if (x) {
        e.emit('success', 'got: ' + x);
      } else {
        e.emit('failure', 'no x passed')
      }
  })

  return e;
}

testEmitter("hello").on("success", function(results){
    console.log('success!' + results);
}).on("failure", function(error){
    console.log('failure!' + error);
})
1

Those are known as promises or Deferreds, which are used widely in jQuery.

The Deferred object, introduced in jQuery 1.5, is a chainable utility object created by calling the jQuery.Deferred() method. It can register multiple callbacks into callback queues, invoke callback queues, and relay the success or failure state of any synchronous or asynchronous function.

The Deferred object is chainable, similar to the way a jQuery object is chainable, but it has its own methods. After creating a Deferred object, you can use any of the methods below by either chaining directly from the object creation or saving the object in a variable and invoking one or more methods on that variable.

There are numerous node modules that implement Deferreds.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.