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  • Platform: Linux 3.2.0 x86 (Debian 7.1)
  • Compiler: GCC 4.7.2 (Debian 4.7.2-5)

I am writing an integer to string conversion function that accepts an integer value(radix) for an argument. The valid range of the integer argument(radix) is extremely small(2-36), smaller than the maximum size of a char. So I want to declare the argument as a char but I have to multiply a long long int by said argument and I am wondering how exactly that works. I do not want to declare the argument as char if that adds anything extra to the calculation process. So my question is what happens when I multiply a long long int by a char in regards to the calculation itself. Also the function writes a small amount of data that is less than the maximum size of an unsigned char at worst case so I want to use a short int to index it because when I try to dereference a pointer using a char I get a warning. So my question is why can pointers not be dereferenced by a char and does using an short int for an index add anything to the dereferencing process or the calculation process when I increase or decrease the index's value by 1. And are those behaviors consistent because I heard that 16 bit integer data types on certain systems are actually less efficient than their 32 bit counterparts in regards to arithmetic but I do not know if that is true.

int integer_conversion(long long int integer, char *str, short int str_size, char radix)
{
    //'i' is the index variable I was talking about.
short int i = 1;
long long int radix_place = 1;

if(str == NULL) return -1;
if(str_size <= 0) return -2;

if(integer < 0)
{
            //radix_place(long long int) * radix(char)
    for(; integer / radix_place <= -radix; radix_place *= radix, i++);
    i++;

    if(i > str_size) return -4;

    str[i] = '\000';
    i--;

    if(radix >= 2 && radix <= 10)
    {
        for(; i >= 1; i--)
        {
                            //integer(long long int) mod radix(char)
            str[i] = -(integer % radix) + '0';
                            //integer(long long int) / radix(char)
            integer /= radix;
        }
    }
    else if(radix >= 11 && radix <= 36)
    {
        for(; i >= 1; i--)
        {
                            //integer(long long int) mod radix(char)
            str[i] = -(integer % radix);

                            //Is any type of conversion or promotion preformed here?
            if(str[i] <= 9) str[i] += '0';
            else str[i] += '7';

                            //integer(long long int) / radix(char)
            integer /= radix;
        }
    }
    else return 2354;

    str[0] = '-';
}
else
{
            //radix_place(long long int) * radix(char)
    for(; integer / radix_place >= radix; radix_place *= radix, i++);

    if(i > str_size) return -4;

    str[i] = '\000';
    i--;

    if(radix >= 2 && radix <= 10)
    {
        for(; i >= 0; i--)
        {
                            //integer(long long int) mod radix(char)
            str[i] = integer % radix + '0';
                            //integer(long long int) / radix(char)
            integer /= radix;
        }
    }
    else if(radix >= 11 && radix <= 36)
    {
        for(; i >= 0; i--)
        {
                            //integer(long long int) mod radix(char)
            str[i] = integer % radix;

                            //Is any type of conversion or promotion preformed here?
            if(str[i] <= 9) str[i] += '0';
            else str[i] += '7';

                            //integer(long long int) / radix(char)
            integer /= radix;
        }
    }
    else return 2354;
}

return 0;
}
  • Don't worry about efficiency — especially efficiency from choosing the right size of integer — until after you've written the code and actually need to make it more efficient. Premature optimization is the root of all evil. – jwodder Nov 6 '13 at 3:29
  • @Aniket You are right I just updated the question. jwodder the function is done for the most part. – John Vulconshinz Nov 6 '13 at 4:01
2

Two parts to this:

  1. Efficiency. On a modern processor, there are no efficiency gains to declaring types shorter than int in most places, such as function parameters and local variables. Maybe char or unsigned char parameters would be useful if you are writing for a small microcontroller.

  2. Correctness. All integer types (including char) will first get promoted to int, unless they don't fit, in which case they get promoted to unsigned int, unless they don't fit. Then the "usual arithmetic conversions" promote both types in most operations to the same type.

Here's an example:

char c;
long long x;
return c * x;

In this case, the result is:

return ((long long) c) * x;

(Unless, perhaps, sizeof(long long) == 1, CHAR_BIT == 64, and char is unsigned by default. But that is a downright pathological case.)

Recommendation

Use int instead of short.

int integer_conversion(long long int integer, char *str, int str_size, int radix)
{
    // don't bother with "short"
    int i = 1;
    long long int radix_place = 1;

    if(str == NULL) return -1;
    if(str_size <= 0) return -2;

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