In the new iOS7 Facebook iPhone app, when the user scrolls up the navigationBar gradually hides itself to a point where it completely vanishes. Then when the user scrolls down the navigationBar gradually shows itself.

How would you implement this behavior yourself? I am aware of the following solution but it disappears right away and it isn't tied to the speed of the user's scroll gesture at all.

[navigationController setNavigationBarHidden: YES animated:YES];

I hope this isn't a duplicate as I'm not sure how best to describe the "expanding/contracting" behavior.

  • 1
    Same issues: stackoverflow.com/questions/21929220/… Note that it is incredibly difficult to absolutely match the Safari behaviour. There are some very, very complicated rules in there! – Fattie Feb 28 '14 at 20:41
  • 1
    In my project I used this project and it worked just fine. Take a look at its documentation. – Vinicius Mar 12 '14 at 19:29
  • github.com/bryankeller/BLKFlexibleHeightBar will let you do what you want and more. It lets you specify exactly how the bar looks at each stage of its transition from maximized to minimized. It even lets you specify your own behaviors, so it can act like Safari, Facebook, or some other app. – blkhp19 Mar 12 '15 at 22:46
  • I did not use a uinavigationbar but added a uiview instead. The view replicating the navigation bar will expand and contract based on scroll. I used scrollViewDidScroll delegate method to achieve the task. You might want to check and execute the source code below.. dropbox.com/s/b2c0zw6yvchaia5/FailedBanks.zip?dl=0 – Deepak Thakur Jan 3 '16 at 17:37

19 Answers 19

The solution given by @peerless is a great start, but it only kicks off an animation whenever dragging begins, without considering the speed of the scroll. This results in a choppier experience than you get in the Facebook app. To match Facebook's behavior, we need to:

  • hide/show the navbar at a rate that is proportional to the rate of the drag
  • kick off an animation to completely hide the bar if scrolling stops when the bar is partially hidden
  • fade the navbar's items as the bar shrinks.

First, you'll need the following property:

@property (nonatomic) CGFloat previousScrollViewYOffset;

And here are the UIScrollViewDelegate methods:

- (void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    CGRect frame = self.navigationController.navigationBar.frame;
    CGFloat size = frame.size.height - 21;
    CGFloat framePercentageHidden = ((20 - frame.origin.y) / (frame.size.height - 1));
    CGFloat scrollOffset = scrollView.contentOffset.y;
    CGFloat scrollDiff = scrollOffset - self.previousScrollViewYOffset;
    CGFloat scrollHeight = scrollView.frame.size.height;
    CGFloat scrollContentSizeHeight = scrollView.contentSize.height + scrollView.contentInset.bottom;

    if (scrollOffset <= -scrollView.contentInset.top) {
        frame.origin.y = 20;
    } else if ((scrollOffset + scrollHeight) >= scrollContentSizeHeight) {
        frame.origin.y = -size;
    } else {
        frame.origin.y = MIN(20, MAX(-size, frame.origin.y - scrollDiff));
    }

    [self.navigationController.navigationBar setFrame:frame];
    [self updateBarButtonItems:(1 - framePercentageHidden)];
    self.previousScrollViewYOffset = scrollOffset;
}

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    [self stoppedScrolling];
}

- (void)scrollViewDidEndDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView 
                  willDecelerate:(BOOL)decelerate
{
    if (!decelerate) {
        [self stoppedScrolling];
    }
}

You'll also need these helper methods:

- (void)stoppedScrolling
{
    CGRect frame = self.navigationController.navigationBar.frame;
    if (frame.origin.y < 20) {
        [self animateNavBarTo:-(frame.size.height - 21)];
    }
}

- (void)updateBarButtonItems:(CGFloat)alpha
{
    [self.navigationItem.leftBarButtonItems enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(UIBarButtonItem* item, NSUInteger i, BOOL *stop) {
        item.customView.alpha = alpha;
    }];
    [self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItems enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(UIBarButtonItem* item, NSUInteger i, BOOL *stop) {
        item.customView.alpha = alpha;
    }];
    self.navigationItem.titleView.alpha = alpha;
    self.navigationController.navigationBar.tintColor = [self.navigationController.navigationBar.tintColor colorWithAlphaComponent:alpha];
}

- (void)animateNavBarTo:(CGFloat)y
{
    [UIView animateWithDuration:0.2 animations:^{
        CGRect frame = self.navigationController.navigationBar.frame;
        CGFloat alpha = (frame.origin.y >= y ? 0 : 1);
        frame.origin.y = y;
        [self.navigationController.navigationBar setFrame:frame];
        [self updateBarButtonItems:alpha];
    }];
}

For a slightly different behavior, replace the line that re-positions the bar when scrolling (the else block in scrollViewDidScroll) with this one:

frame.origin.y = MIN(20, 
                     MAX(-size, frame.origin.y - 
                               (frame.size.height * (scrollDiff / scrollHeight))));

This positions the bar based on the last scroll percentage, instead of an absolute amount, which results in a slower fade. The original behavior is more Facebook-like, but I like this one, too.

Note: This solution is iOS 7+ only. Be sure to add the necessary checks if you're supporting older versions of iOS.

  • This works. Except you are assuming the bar button items have custom views. In my case I don't have a custom view. So the above does not hide the bar buttons. I think @peerless solution is better for hiding and showing navbar items – Dhanush Jan 10 '14 at 21:25
  • 1
    You are right. I may look into a more general solution this weekend. Shouldn't be too difficult to target the default items instead of customView. – Wayne Burkett Jan 10 '14 at 21:28
  • I haven't addressed @Dhanush's issue but I do have an update. – Wayne Burkett Jan 14 '14 at 20:20
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    I fixed the issue with stock bar buttons, but this code has another issue. If ScrollView's contentSize is smaller than frame, the animation of sliding does not work. Also make sure you reset all navigation item's alpha back to 1.0 in viewDidDisappear. – Legoless Jan 20 '14 at 12:35
  • 1
    Did you check this solution on controllers which are used AutoLayout? In my case everything is working fine without AutoLayout, but when it turn on, it still be visible some strange white strip under it – Alexander B. Feb 23 '14 at 14:47

EDIT: Only for iOS 8 and above.

You can try use

self.navigationController.hidesBarsOnSwipe = YES;

Works for me.

If your coding in swift you have to use this way (from https://stackoverflow.com/a/27662702/2283308)

navigationController?.hidesBarsOnSwipe = true
  • this is not available in iOS < 8.0 – Petar Mar 9 '15 at 14:41
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    As pet60t0 said, and I am apologize, only works for iOS 8 and above. – Pedro Romão Mar 9 '15 at 23:34
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    How do you bring it back after that? – c1pherB1t Apr 29 '15 at 16:30
  • the behaviour it's a bit strange. I didn't explore much, but if you scroll faster it shows again. – Pedro Romão Apr 30 '15 at 9:50
  • @PedroRomão great answer. – Gagan_iOS Dec 20 '16 at 8:01

Here is one more implementation: TLYShyNavBar v1.0.0 released!

I decided to make my own after trying the solutions provided, and to me, they were either performing poorly, had a a high barrier of entry and boiler plate code, or lacked the extension view beneath the navbar. To use this component, all you have to do is:

self.shyNavBarManager.scrollView = self.scrollView;

Oh, and it is battle tested in our own app.

  • @TimArnold Thanks for your feedback! I have fixed that issue, just didn't update the pod yet >_< will do that right now! .. Pod updated! – Mazyod Jul 6 '14 at 20:32
  • I'll give it another shot! Thanks! – Tim Camber Jul 7 '14 at 2:32
  • I appreciate your help. Looks like your commit helped. I'm still getting a strange issue where my UICollectionView isn't properly resized as the nav bar is, and so cells going up where the nav bar USED to be are clipped, as they are outside the collection view bounds. Do you know why this might be happening? – Tim Camber Jul 9 '14 at 2:39
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    Figures: found my solution seconds after writing this comment. I had to make sure extendedLayoutIncludesOpaqueBars was set to YES on my UICollectionViewController – Tim Camber Jul 9 '14 at 2:42
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    OUTSTANDING name by the way, "shy" bar -- you've coined a great name. Thanks for that. – Fattie Jul 28 '14 at 12:52

You can have a look at my GTScrollNavigationBar. I have subclassed UINavigationBar to make it scroll based on the scrolling of a UIScrollView.

Note: If you have an OPAQUE navigation bar, the scrollview must EXPAND as the navigation bar gets HIDDEN. This is exactly what GTScrollNavigationBar does. (Just as in for example Safari on iOS.)

  • BTW for anyone reading, exactly how to call initWithNavigationBarClass ... stackoverflow.com/questions/22286166 – Fattie Mar 10 '14 at 7:26
  • @JoeBlow I assume your bounty is for this answer. I heartily approve, it's excellent. – jrturton Mar 10 '14 at 10:48
  • @Thuy great work man! So I have this working on perfectly on a table view controller except one thing... I have pull to refresh implemented at the top. It gets weird when trying to pull down and refresh. Might there be a workaround for this? – aherrick Oct 17 '14 at 2:03
  • @Thuy also... lets say I had a view controller where I've implemented a table view at the bottom. I want to hook up to that table view which works, however I have another view that is sitting above the table view that I want to disappear as well. How might this work? – aherrick Oct 17 '14 at 2:05
  • Good library :-) works like a charm. – user1007522 Apr 1 '15 at 7:39

iOS8 includes properties to get the navigation bar hiding for free. There is a WWDC video that demonstrates it, search for "View Controller Advancements in iOS 8".

Example:

class QuotesTableViewController: UITableViewController {

override func viewDidAppear(animated: Bool) {
    super.viewDidAppear(animated)

    navigationController?.hidesBarsOnSwipe = true
}

}

Other properties:

class UINavigationController : UIViewController {

    //... truncated

    /// When the keyboard appears, the navigation controller's navigationBar toolbar will be hidden. The bars will remain hidden when the keyboard dismisses, but a tap in the content area will show them.
    @availability(iOS, introduced=8.0)
    var hidesBarsWhenKeyboardAppears: Bool
    /// When the user swipes, the navigation controller's navigationBar & toolbar will be hidden (on a swipe up) or shown (on a swipe down). The toolbar only participates if it has items.
    @availability(iOS, introduced=8.0)
    var hidesBarsOnSwipe: Bool
    /// The gesture recognizer that triggers if the bars will hide or show due to a swipe. Do not change the delegate or attempt to replace this gesture by overriding this method.
    @availability(iOS, introduced=8.0)
    var barHideOnSwipeGestureRecognizer: UIPanGestureRecognizer { get }
    /// When the UINavigationController's vertical size class is compact, hide the UINavigationBar and UIToolbar. Unhandled taps in the regions that would normally be occupied by these bars will reveal the bars.
    @availability(iOS, introduced=8.0)
    var hidesBarsWhenVerticallyCompact: Bool
    /// When the user taps, the navigation controller's navigationBar & toolbar will be hidden or shown, depending on the hidden state of the navigationBar. The toolbar will only be shown if it has items to display.
    @availability(iOS, introduced=8.0)
    var hidesBarsOnTap: Bool
    /// The gesture recognizer used to recognize if the bars will hide or show due to a tap in content. Do not change the delegate or attempt to replace this gesture by overriding this method.
    @availability(iOS, introduced=8.0)
    unowned(unsafe) var barHideOnTapGestureRecognizer: UITapGestureRecognizer { get }
}

Found via http://natashatherobot.com/navigation-bar-interactions-ios8/

I have some kind of a quick and dirty solution for that. Haven't made any in-depth testing but here's the idea:

That property will keep all the items in the navbar for my UITableViewController class

@property (strong, nonatomic) NSArray *navBarItems;

In the same UITableViewController class I have:

-(void)scrollViewDidScrollToTop:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    if([[[UIDevice currentDevice] systemVersion] floatValue] < 7.0f){
        return;
    }

    CGRect frame = self.navigationController.navigationBar.frame;
    frame.origin.y = 20;

    if(self.navBarItems.count > 0){
        [self.navigationController.navigationBar setItems:self.navBarItems];
    }

    [self.navigationController.navigationBar setFrame:frame];
}

-(void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    if([[[UIDevice currentDevice] systemVersion] floatValue] < 7.0f){
        return;
    }

    CGRect frame = self.navigationController.navigationBar.frame;
    CGFloat size = frame.size.height - 21;

    if([scrollView.panGestureRecognizer translationInView:self.view].y < 0)
    {
        frame.origin.y = -size;

        if(self.navigationController.navigationBar.items.count > 0){
            self.navBarItems = [self.navigationController.navigationBar.items copy];
            [self.navigationController.navigationBar setItems:nil];
        }
    }
    else if([scrollView.panGestureRecognizer translationInView:self.view].y > 0)
    {
        frame.origin.y = 20;

        if(self.navBarItems.count > 0){
            [self.navigationController.navigationBar setItems:self.navBarItems];
        }
    }

    [UIView beginAnimations:@"toggleNavBar" context:nil];
    [UIView setAnimationDuration:0.2];
    [self.navigationController.navigationBar setFrame:frame];
    [UIView commitAnimations];
}

That's only for ios >= 7, it's ugly I know but a quick way to achieve this. Any comments/suggestions are welcome :)

Here is my implementation: SherginScrollableNavigationBar.

In my approach I am using KVO for observing UIScrollView's state, so there is no necessity to use a delegate (and you can use this delegate for whatever else you need).

  • FYI this does not always work correctly. I tried this too and it works as long as you are not "bouncing" the scrollview. It seems KVO is not triggered when in the bounce part. The delegate call for the contentOffset is triggered though. – Joris Mans Jul 24 '16 at 19:51

This works for iOS 8 and above and ensures that the status bar still retains its background

self.navigationController.hidesBarsOnSwipe = YES;
CGRect statuBarFrame = [UIApplication sharedApplication].statusBarFrame;
UIView *statusbarBg = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:statuBarFrame];
statusbarBg.backgroundColor = [UIColor blackColor];
[self.navigationController.view addSubview:statusbarBg];

And if you want to show the nav bar when you tap on the status bar you can do this:

- (void)scrollViewDidScrollToTop:(UIScrollView *)scrollView {
     self.navigationController.navigationBarHidden = NO;
}

Please try this solution of mine and let me know why this ain't as good as the previous answers.

- (void)scrollViewWillEndDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView withVelocity:(CGPoint)velocity targetContentOffset:(inout CGPoint *)targetContentOffset
{
    if (fabs(velocity.y) > 1)
        [self hideTopBar:(velocity.y > 0)];
}

- (void)hideTopBar:(BOOL)hide
{
    [self.navigationController setNavigationBarHidden:hide animated:YES];
    [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setStatusBarHidden:hide withAnimation:UIStatusBarAnimationSlide];
}
  • 1
    I did something similar to this, and this is easily the best solution. I've tried several hacks and libraries, and this is the only one which works for iOS 9 with a tableView not covering the whole screen. Kudos! – skensell Apr 11 '16 at 16:00
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    You have best solution, thanks – Tai Le May 28 '16 at 16:45

One way that I’ve accomplished this is the following.

Register your view controller to be the UIScrollViewDelegate of your UITableView for example.

- (void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView;
- (void)scrollViewDidEndDecelerating:(UIScrollView *)scrollView;
- (void)scrollViewDidEndDragging:(UIScrollView *)scrollView willDecelerate:(BOOL)decelerate;

From within de UIScrollViewDelegate methods you can get the new contentOffset and translate your UINavigationBar up or down accordingly.

Setting the alpha of the subviews can also be done based on some threshold values and factors you can set and compute.

Hope it helps!

  • Found similar post here – Diana Sule Nov 7 '13 at 3:11
  • Thanks Diana! I suspected I might have to implement the UIScrollViewDelegate methods but it seemed like it might be a little overkill. Once I figure this thing out I'll post it up. Cheers! – El Mocoso Nov 8 '13 at 17:31

In addition to Iwburk's answer I added the following to fix the alpha issue on non custom navigation bars and to reset the navigation bar in the viewWillDisappear method:

- (void)updateBarButtonItems:(CGFloat)alpha
{
    for (UIView *view in self.navigationController.navigationBar.subviews) {
        NSString *className = NSStringFromClass([view class]);

        if ( ![className isEqualToString:@"_UINavigationBarBackground"] ) {
            view.alpha = alpha;
        }
    }
}

- (void)resetNavigationBar {
    CGRect frame = self.navigationController.navigationBar.frame;
    frame.origin.y = 20;
    [self.navigationController.navigationBar setFrame:frame];
    [self updateBarButtonItems:1.0f];
}
  • Is there any other way than looping through the subviews? – thisiscrazy4 Mar 26 '14 at 23:48
  • From what I could tell on a non custom navigation bar there are 4 total subviews: _UINavigationBarBackground, UINavigationItemView, UINavigationItemButtonView, and _UINavigationBarBackIndicatorView. The loop is pretty quick and does not seem to affect any performance of my app. – blueice Mar 27 '14 at 18:01
  • Since _UINavigationBarBackground seems to always be the first subview you could just access the rest directly: ((UIView *)self.navigationController.navigationBar.subviews[1]).alpha = alpha; – blueice Mar 27 '14 at 18:12

I was looking for a solution that allowed for any style and any behavior. You'll notice that bar condensing behavior is different in many different apps. And of course, the way the bar looks is totally different between apps.

I created a solution for this issue with https://github.com/bryankeller/BLKFlexibleHeightBar/

You can definine your own behavior rules to control how and when the bar shrinks and grows, and you can define exactly how you want the bar's subviews to react to the bar condensing or growing.

Have a look at my project if you want a lot of flexibility to make whatever kind of header bar you can think up.

  • How can i add a button to this customHeaderView which will hide when I scroll up.I don't need static button.Is it possible?I tried creating one button as a subview.But it is not receiving any touches. – abhi1992 Mar 15 '16 at 10:31

I tried implementing GTScrollNavigationBar but my app required me to modify auto layout constraints. I decided to put an example of my implementation up on GitHub in case anyone else has to do this with auto layout. The other issue I had with most of the other implementations is that people don't set the bounds of the scroll view to avoid the parallax scrolling effect that you create while you scroll and adjust the size of the scrollview simultaneously.

Check out JSCollapsingNavBarViewController if you need to do this with auto layout. I've included two versions, one with the nav bar only and another with a sub-bar below the nav bar which collapses before collapsing the nav bar.

I was trying to emulate this behavior in a situation where I needed a customized header sitting about a UITableView. I rolled my own "navigation" bar because this sits below a bunch of other stuff on the page and I wanted the section headers to follow the default "docking" behavior. I think I found a pretty clever and succinct way to adjust a UITableView/UIScrollView together with another object in a style similar to that seen in the Facebook/Instagram/Chrome/etc. apps.

In my .xib file, I have my components loaded into a freeform view: http://imgur.com/0z9yebJ (sorry, don't have the rep to inline images)

Notice that, in the left sidebar, the table is ordered behind the main header view. You can't tell from the screenshot, but it also has the same y position as the main header view. Since it extends out of sight, the contentInset property on the UITableView set to 76 (the height of the main header view).

To make the main header view slide up in unison with the UIScrollView, I use the UIScrollViewDelegate's scrollViewDidScroll methods to perform some calculations and change the UIScrollView's contentInset as well as the main header view's frame.

- (void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView {
    UIEdgeInsets insets = scrollView.contentInset;
    //tableViewInsetDelta and tableViewOriginalInsetValue are NSInteger variables that I set to 0 and 76, respectively, in viewDidLoad
    tableViewInsetDelta = tableViewOriginalInsetValue + scrollView.contentOffset.y;
    insets.top = tableViewOriginalInsetValue - tableViewInsetDelta;

    if (scrollView.contentOffset.y > -76 && scrollView.contentOffset.y < 0) {
        [scrollView setContentInset:insets];
        self.pathTitleContainer.frame = CGRectMake(self.pathTitleContainer.frame.origin.x, 44 - tableViewInsetDelta, self.pathTitleContainer.frame.size.width, self.pathTitleContainer.frame.size.height);
    } else if (scrollView.contentOffset.y > 0) {
        insets.top = 0;
        [scrollView setContentInset:insets];
        self.pathTitleContainer.frame = CGRectMake(self.pathTitleContainer.frame.origin.x, -32, self.pathTitleContainer.frame.size.width, self.pathTitleContainer.frame.size.height);
    } else if (scrollView.contentOffset.y < -76) {
        insets.top = 76;
        [scrollView setContentInset:insets];
        self.pathTitleContainer.frame = CGRectMake(self.pathTitleContainer.frame.origin.x, 44, self.pathTitleContainer.frame.size.width, self.pathTitleContainer.frame.size.height);
    }
}

The first if statement does most of the heavy lifting, but I had to include the other two to handle situations where the user is dragging forcefully and the initial contentOffset values sent to scrollViewDidScroll are outside of the range of the first if statement.

Ultimately, this is working really well for me. I hate loading up my projects with a bunch of bloated subclasses. I can't speak to whether this is the best solution performance-wise (I've always been hesitant to put any code in scrollViewDidScroll since it gets called all the time), but the code footprint is the smallest I've seen in any solution for this problem and it doesn't involve nesting a UITableView in a UIScrollView (Apple advises against this in the documentation and touch events end up a bit funky on the UITableView). Hope this helps someone!

HidingNavigationBar a great project that hides the Navigation Bar and the Tab Bar if you want.

HidingNavigationBar supports hiding/showing of the following view elements:

UINavigationBar

UINavigationBar and an extension UIView

UINavigationBar and a UIToolbar

UINavigationBar and a UITabBar

https://github.com/tristanhimmelman/HidingNavigationBar

i tried it with this way, i hope it will help. just implement the code in delegate method and set to to the desired view/subview

-(void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView{ 
            CGRect frame=self.view.frame;
            CGRect resultFrame=CGRectZero;
            if(scrollView.contentOffset.y==0 || scrollView.contentOffset.y<0){
                self.lastContentOffset=0;
                self.offset=0;
                resultFrame=CGRectMake(0, frame.size.height-(40-self.offset.intValue), frame.size.width, 40-self.offset.intValue);
    // Pass the resultFrame
                [self showHide:YES withFrame:resultFrame];
            }else if (self.lastContentOffset > scrollView.contentOffset.y){
                NSNumber *temp=[NSNumber numberWithDouble:self.lastContentOffset-scrollView.contentOffset.y];
                if(temp.intValue>40 || self.offset.intValue<temp.intValue){
                    self.offset=[NSNumber numberWithInt:0];
                    resultFrame=CGRectMake(0, frame.size.height-(40-self.offset.intValue), frame.size.width, 40-self.offset.intValue);
    // Pass the resultFrame
                    [self showHide:YES withFrame:resultFrame];
                }else{
                    if(temp.intValue>0){
                        self.offset=[NSNumber numberWithInt:self.offset.intValue-temp.intValue];
                        resultFrame=CGRectMake(0, frame.size.height-(40-self.offset.intValue), frame.size.width, 40-self.offset.intValue);
    // Pass the resultFrame
                        [self showHide:YES withFrame:resultFrame];
                    }
                }
            }else if (self.lastContentOffset < scrollView.contentOffset.y){
                NSNumber *temp=[NSNumber numberWithDouble:scrollView.contentOffset.y-self.lastContentOffset];
                if(self.offset.intValue>40 || (self.offset.intValue+temp.intValue)>40){
                    self.offset=[NSNumber numberWithInt:40];
    // Pass the resultFrame
                    [self showHide:NO withFrame:resultFrame];
                }else{
                    self.offset=[NSNumber numberWithInt:self.offset.intValue+temp.intValue];
                    resultFrame=CGRectMake(0, frame.size.height-(40-self.offset.intValue), frame.size.width, 40-self.offset.intValue);
    // Pass the resultFrame
                    [self showHide:YES withFrame:resultFrame];
                }
            }
            self.lastContentOffset = scrollView.contentOffset.y;

        }

-(void)showHide:(Boolean)boolView withFrame:(CGRect)frame{
               if(showSRPFilter){
                        //Assign value of "frame"to any view on which you wan to to perform animation
                }else{
                       //Assign value of "frame"to any view on which you wan to to perform animation
                }
        }

An extension of @Iwburk 's answer... Instead of changing the origin of the navigation bar, I needed to expand/shrink the size of the navigation bar.

- (void)scrollViewDidScroll:(UIScrollView *)scrollView
{
    CGRect frame = self.previousRect; // a property set in the init method to hold the initial size of the uinavigationbar
    CGFloat size = frame.size.height;
    CGFloat framePercentageHidden = ((MINIMUMNAVBARHEIGHT - frame.origin.y) / (frame.size.height - 1));
    CGFloat scrollOffset = scrollView.contentOffset.y;
    CGFloat scrollDiff = scrollOffset - self.previousScrollViewYOffset;
    CGFloat scrollHeight = scrollView.frame.size.height;
    CGFloat scrollContentSizeHeight = scrollView.contentSize.height + scrollView.contentInset.bottom;

    if (scrollOffset <= -scrollView.contentInset.top) {
        frame.origin.y = -MINIMUMNAVBARHEIGHT;
    } else if ((scrollOffset + scrollHeight) >= scrollContentSizeHeight) {
        frame.origin.y = -size;
    } else {
        frame.origin.y = MIN(-MINIMUMNAVBARHEIGHT, MAX(-size, frame.origin.y - scrollDiff));
    }

    self.previousRect = CGRectMake(0, frame.origin.y, self.jsExtendedBarView.frame.size.width, 155);
    self.layoutConstraintExtendedViewHeight.constant = MAXIMUMNAVBARHEIGHT + frame.origin.y + MINIMUMNAVBARHEIGHT;
    [self updateBarButtonItems:(1 - framePercentageHidden)];
    self.previousScrollViewYOffset = scrollOffset;
}

It doesn't work with the stoppedScrolling method yet, ill post an update when I have it

All of these approaches seem overly complicated... So naturally, I built my own:

class ViewController: UIViewController, UIScrollViewDelegate {
    var originalNavbarHeight:CGFloat = 0.0
    var minimumNavbarHeight:CGFloat = 0
    weak var scrollView:UIScrollView!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.
        // setup delegates 
        scrollView.delegate = self
        // save the original nav bar height
        originalNavbarHeight = navigationController!.navigationBar.height
    }


    func scrollViewDidScroll(scrollView: UIScrollView) {
        // will relayout subviews
        view.setNeedsLayout() // calls viewDidLayoutSubviews
    }

    override func viewDidLayoutSubviews() {
        var percentageScrolled = min(scrollView.contentOffset.y / originalNavbarHeight, 1)
        navigationController?.navigationBar.height = min(max((1 - percentageScrolled) * originalNavbarHeight, minimumNavbarHeight), originalNavbarHeight)
        // re-position and scale scrollview
        scrollView.y = navigationController!.navigationBar.height + UIApplication.sharedApplication().statusBarFrame.height
        scrollView.height = view.height - scrollView.y
    }

    override func viewWillDisappear(animated: Bool) {
        navigationController?.navigationBar.height = originalNavbarHeight
    }

}

I found all answers given in Objective-C. This is my answer in Swift 3. This is very generic code and can be used directly. It works with both UIScrollView and UITableView.

var lastContentOffset: CGPoint? = nil
var maxMinus: CGFloat           = -24.0
var maxPlus: CGFloat            = 20.0
var initial: CGFloat            = 0.0

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    self.title = "Alarm Details"
    self.lastContentOffset = self.alarmDetailsTableView.contentOffset
    initial = maxPlus
}

func scrollViewDidScroll(_ scrollView: UIScrollView)
{
    var navigationBarFrame: CGRect   = self.navigationController!.navigationBar.frame
    let currentOffset = scrollView.contentOffset

    if (currentOffset.y > (self.lastContentOffset?.y)!) {
        if currentOffset.y > 0 {
            initial = initial - fabs(CGFloat(currentOffset.y - self.lastContentOffset!.y))
        }
        else if scrollView.contentSize.height < scrollView.frame.size.height {
            initial = initial + fabs(CGFloat(currentOffset.y - self.lastContentOffset!.y))
        }
    }
    else {
        if currentOffset.y < scrollView.contentSize.height - scrollView.frame.size.height {
            initial = initial + fabs(CGFloat(currentOffset.y - self.lastContentOffset!.y))
        }
        else if scrollView.contentSize.height < scrollView.frame.size.height && initial < maxPlus {
            initial = initial - fabs(CGFloat(currentOffset.y - self.lastContentOffset!.y))
        }
    }

    initial = (initial <= maxMinus) ? maxMinus : initial
    initial = (initial >= maxPlus) ? maxPlus : initial

    navigationBarFrame.origin.y = initial

    self.navigationController!.navigationBar.frame = navigationBarFrame
    scrollView.frame = CGRect(x: 0.0, y: initial + navigationBarFrame.size.height , width: navigationBarFrame.size.width, height: self.view.frame.size.height - (initial + navigationBarFrame.size.height))

    let framePercentageHidden: CGFloat              = ((20 - navigationBarFrame.origin.y) / (navigationBarFrame.size.height));
    self.lastContentOffset                          = currentOffset;
    self.updateBarButtonItems(alpha: 1 - framePercentageHidden)
}

func updateBarButtonItems(alpha: CGFloat)
{
    self.navigationController?.navigationBar.titleTextAttributes = [NSForegroundColorAttributeName: UIColor.darkGray.withAlphaComponent(alpha)]
    self.navigationController?.navigationBar.isUserInteractionEnabled = (alpha < 1) ? false: true

    guard (self.navigationItem.leftBarButtonItems?.count) != nil else { return }

    for (_, value) in self.navigationItem.leftBarButtonItems!.enumerated() {
        value.customView?.alpha = alpha
    }

    guard (self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItems?.count) != nil else { return }

    for (_, value) in (self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItems?.enumerated())! {
        value.customView?.alpha = alpha
    }
}

The logic of setting alpha to navigation items is copied from @WayneBurkett answer and rewritten in Swift 3.

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