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I wrote this program in order to be able to find the number of A/U and C/G pairs from the users input. When I run it, it keeps saying "Invalid Syntax" while highlighting the first "else:" after the while loop in red. Anyone know what I need to change to fix it?

def main():

    first = input("Please enter the RNA sequence for which you wish to find the number of pairs. \nFirst line:")
    second = input("Second String:")

    a1base = first.count('A')
    u1base = first.count('U')
    c1base = first.count('C')
    g1base = first.count('G')
    a2base = second.count('A')
    u2base = second.count('U')
    c2base = second.count('C')
    g2base = second.count('G')

    while (a1base >= 1) and (u1base >= 1) or (a2base >= 1) and (u2base >= 1):
        abases = (a1base+ a2base)
        ubases = (u1base + u2base)
        firstset = min(abases, ubases)
        print("You have", firstset,"A/U bases.")
        else:
            print("You have zero A/U bases.")

    while (c1base >= 1) and (g1base >= 1) or (c2base >= 1) and (g2base >= 1):
        cbases = (c1base + c2base)
        gbases = (g1base + g2base)
        secondset = min(cbases, gbases)
        print("You have", secondset,"C/G bases.")
        else:
            print("You have zero C/G bases.")



main()
  • 3
    Why does it keep saying invalid syntax? => Usually because your syntax is invalid. In your case, your else indentation does not match any if, for or while. – njzk2 Nov 6 '13 at 22:55
  • As a side note, this is not a "coding-style" question. Coding style is about choosing between different legitimate ways to write or lay out equivalent, valid code, not about writing valid code in the first place. – abarnert Nov 6 '13 at 23:10
3

You have an else: that isn't attached to any if, for, while, or try statement, which is illegal.

If you meant for the else to be attached to the while, the solution is simple: Change the indentation to attach it:

while (a1base >= 1) and (u1base >= 1) or (a2base >= 1) and (u2base >= 1):
    abases = (a1base+ a2base)
    ubases = (u1base + u2base)
    firstset = min(abases, ubases)
    print("You have", firstset,"A/U bases.")
else:
    print("You have zero A/U bases.")

See break and continue Statements, and else Clauses on Loops in the tutorial (and Compound statements in the language reference for full details).

  • But the else block will always be called in this case. Doesn't make sense. – Oleh Prypin Nov 6 '13 at 22:56
  • @OlehPrypin Your badly indented else makes even less sense. – Hyperboreus Nov 6 '13 at 23:04
  • @OlehPrypin: True, but trying to guess what the OP was actually trying to do is a mug's game. Maybe he wanted to break after the first print, in which case he needs to add a break. Or maybe he wanted to keep track of whether any prints had occurred and only do the else if none did, in which case he's misusing else. Or maybe he wanted something completely different. I have no idea—but in any case, he first has to get the code compiling before he can figure out what to do next. – abarnert Nov 6 '13 at 23:04
  • 1
    @Hyperboreus: I don't think OlehPrypin is the OP here. Except in the sense that his initials are "OP". :) – abarnert Nov 6 '13 at 23:05
  • 2
    Sorry both of you. As OP's loops don't have an exit condition and the variables in the initial condition are never altered, I guess the whiles should be ifs. But this is just consulting my crystal ball. – Hyperboreus Nov 6 '13 at 23:07
1

Your else needs to be indented at the same level as your while, which doesn't really make sense in this case because there's no break in your loop, or you need to add an if on some line before it.

0

I see two obvious things:

  1. Everything after def main(): should be indented;
  2. Else should be at the same level of indentation as while. It is not a child, but a sibling of while.
0

Others have already explained the error.

Try changing you while loops to this:

abases = (a1base+ a2base)
ubases = (u1base + u2base)
firstset = min(abases, ubases)
print("You have", firstset if firstset else 'zero',"A/U bases.")

cbases = (c1base + c2base)
gbases = (g1base + g2base)
secondset = min(cbases, gbases)
print("You have", secondset if secondset else 'zero',"C/G bases.")

Without any while or else:.

Also the following snippet should do the same thing:

first = input("Please enter the RNA sequence for which you wish to find the number of pairs. \nFirst line:")
second = input("Second String:")
bases = {k: (first + second).count(k) for k in 'AUCG'}
print('You have', min(bases['A'], bases['U']), 'A/U bases.')
print('You have', min(bases['C'], bases['G']), 'C/G bases.')

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