263

Is there any annotation for a Filter class (for web applications) in Spring Boot? Perhaps @Filter?

I want to add a custom filter in my project.

The Spring Boot Reference Guide mentioned about FilterRegistrationBean, but I am not sure how to use it.

3
  • 1
    Note, that the Filter added with @WebFilter does not behave like a real filter in Servlet spec. It will be a spring bean called after a lot of other spring beans and not like real filters before any servlet code.
    – lrxw
    Jun 5 '18 at 12:32
  • can you tell me you exact requirement. If you want filter classes for ComponentScan then there is an annotation for that "@ComponentScan.Filter"
    – Keaz
    Jun 23 '18 at 7:56
  • you should write more detail, we have different type of filter, ex: filter for requests , client side filter to filter from a list and so on Apr 14 at 4:47

24 Answers 24

172

If you want to setup a third-party filter you can use FilterRegistrationBean.

For example, the equivalent of web.xml:

<filter>
     <filter-name>SomeFilter</filter-name>
        <filter-class>com.somecompany.SomeFilter</filter-class>
</filter>
<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>SomeFilter</filter-name>
    <url-pattern>/url/*</url-pattern>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>paramName</param-name>
        <param-value>paramValue</param-value>
    </init-param>
</filter-mapping>

These will be the two beans in your @Configuration file:

@Bean
public FilterRegistrationBean someFilterRegistration() {

    FilterRegistrationBean registration = new FilterRegistrationBean();
    registration.setFilter(someFilter());
    registration.addUrlPatterns("/url/*");
    registration.addInitParameter("paramName", "paramValue");
    registration.setName("someFilter");
    registration.setOrder(1);
    return registration;
}

public Filter someFilter() {
    return new SomeFilter();
}

The above was tested with Spring Boot 1.2.3.

11
  • 2
    what if i want to add multiple filters? @Opal Sep 15 '15 at 1:37
  • 8
    Just add an additional @Bean public FilterRegistrationBean additionalFilterRegistration()
    – Haim Raman
    Sep 16 '15 at 11:16
  • 7
    FilterRegistrationBean.setOrder
    – Haim Raman
    May 29 '16 at 4:02
  • 1
    The sample misses @Bean onto someFilter(). Sep 8 '17 at 20:50
  • 1
    What package is Filter in? I'm seeing over 24 possible matches. Maybe include an import statement snippet.
    – dlamblin
    Apr 28 at 22:53
125

Here is an example of one method of including a custom filter in a Spring Boot MVC application. Be sure to include the package in a component scan:

package com.dearheart.gtsc.filters;

import java.io.IOException;

import javax.servlet.Filter;
import javax.servlet.FilterChain;
import javax.servlet.FilterConfig;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;

import org.springframework.context.annotation.Profile;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

@Component
public class XClacksOverhead implements Filter {

  public static final String X_CLACKS_OVERHEAD = "X-Clacks-Overhead";

  @Override
  public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res,
      FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {

    HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;
    response.setHeader(X_CLACKS_OVERHEAD, "GNU Terry Pratchett");
    chain.doFilter(req, res);
  }

  @Override
  public void destroy() {}

  @Override
  public void init(FilterConfig arg0) throws ServletException {}

}
6
  • 5
    Should filter be registered somewhere? Sep 2 '15 at 22:09
  • 1
    When I tried that approach, Filter was created as bean and even was injected to other class but init() method didn't run. Probably, init() works only in 'normal' registering not by spring container. I think, one may use PostConstruct instead of init() but I didn't try that as I refused declaring Filter as Spring bean.
    – Baurzhan
    May 18 '16 at 10:58
  • What about filter ordering using this approach? Sep 8 '17 at 16:50
  • How can we get RS body from ServletResponse? Oct 13 '17 at 13:36
  • 3
    One important thing to note is that the name of your bean (based on your class name) should not be the same as a Spring bean. For instance, you might be tempted to create a MetricsFilter, but this bean will be overshadowed by the Spring actuator bean of the same name. Learned this the hard way...
    – kinbiko
    Nov 8 '17 at 11:50
83

There are three ways to add your filter,

  1. Annotate your filter with one of the Spring stereotypes such as @Component
  2. Register a @Bean with Filter type in Spring @Configuration
  3. Register a @Bean with FilterRegistrationBean type in Spring @Configuration

Either #1 or #2 will do if you want your filter applies to all requests without customization, use #3 otherwise. You don't need to specify component scan for #1 to work as long as you place your filter class in the same or sub-package of your SpringApplication class. For #3, use along with #2 is only necessary when you want Spring to manage your filter class such as have it auto wired dependencies. It works just fine for me to new my filter which doesn't need any dependency autowiring/injection.

Although combining #2 and #3 works fine, I was surprised it doesn't end up with two filters applying twice. My guess is that Spring combines the two beans as one when it calls the same method to create both of them. In case you want to use #3 alone with authowiring, you can AutowireCapableBeanFactory. The following is an example,

private @Autowired AutowireCapableBeanFactory beanFactory;

    @Bean
    public FilterRegistrationBean myFilter() {
        FilterRegistrationBean registration = new FilterRegistrationBean();
        Filter myFilter = new MyFilter();
        beanFactory.autowireBean(myFilter);
        registration.setFilter(myFilter);
        registration.addUrlPatterns("/myfilterpath/*");
        return registration;
    }
3
  • Excellent answer. Thanks for detailing all the options and also covering how to autowire your Filter while using FilterRegistrationBean
    – sbk
    May 12 '17 at 7:01
  • Great answer. This is exactly what I have wonted!!
    – haykart
    Oct 20 '17 at 20:54
  • 1
    This is also described here: baeldung.com/spring-boot-add-filter Feb 21 '20 at 19:40
82

There isn't a special annotation to denote a servlet filter. You just declare a @Bean of type Filter (or FilterRegistrationBean). An example (adding a custom header to all responses) is in Boot's own EndpointWebMvcAutoConfiguration;

If you only declare a Filter it will be applied to all requests. If you also add a FilterRegistrationBean you can additionally specify individual servlets and url patterns to apply.

Note:

As of Spring Boot 1.4, FilterRegistrationBean is not deprecated and simply moved packages from org.springframework.boot.context.embedded.FilterRegistrationBean to org.springframework.boot.web.servlet.FilterRegistrationBean

5
  • Would you mind to tell me how to include corresponding entry in build.gradle? I added the following, but it doesn't get compiled: providedCompile('javax.servlet:servlet-api:2.5') runtime('javax.servlet:jstl:1.1.2')
    – janetsmith
    Nov 7 '13 at 19:13
  • 3
    Spring Boot isn't going to work with Servlet 2.5, and there isn't really much support for JSP yet. I'm not really a gradler, so I don't know what you are trying to do. What's wrong with "compile"? Does it work if you just depend on "spring-boot-starter-web"? (I don't think these questions are related to the original question though, so maybe you should post again with the new questions?)
    – Dave Syer
    Nov 8 '13 at 11:24
  • I added a filter by implementing Filter interface, however Eclipse is unable to find the interface. So I am trying to figure out how to add it to classpath for compiling.
    – janetsmith
    Nov 8 '13 at 18:19
  • 1
    Yes, of course you need to have Filter on your classpath. Normally I would just use the spring-boot-starter-web to pull in all the relevant depdendencies (e.g. here).
    – Dave Syer
    Nov 12 '13 at 13:58
  • As other responses detail, you can also just annotate your Filter class with @Component and it will be automatically registered (for all URLs). Feb 21 '20 at 19:41
37

UPDATE: 2017-12-16:

There are two simple ways to do this in Spring Boot 1.5.8.RELEASE and there isn't any need for XML.

First way:

If you do not have any specific URL pattern, you can use @Component like this (full code and details are here https://www.surasint.com/spring-boot-filter/):

@Component
public class ExampleFilter implements Filter {
    ...
}

Second way:

If you want to use URL patterns, you can use @WebFilter like this (full code and details are here https://www.surasint.com/spring-boot-filter-urlpattern/):

@WebFilter(urlPatterns = "/api/count")
public class ExampleFilter implements Filter {
    ...
}

But you also need to add @ServletComponentScan annotation in your @SpringBootApplication class:

@ServletComponentScan
@SpringBootApplication
public class MyApplication extends SpringBootServletInitializer {
    ...
}

Note that @Component is Spring's annotation, but @WebFilter is not. @WebFilter is Servlet 3 annotation.

Both ways, you just need a basic Spring Boot dependency in pom.xml (there isn't any need for an explicit Tomcat embedded jasper)

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <parent>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
        <version>1.5.8.RELEASE</version>
    </parent>

    <groupId>com.surasint.example</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-04</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>jar</packaging>
    <properties>
        <maven.compiler.target>1.8</maven.compiler.target>
        <maven.compiler.source>1.8</maven.compiler.source>
    </properties>
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
                <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
</project>

WARNING: The first way, if the Controller in Spring Boot returns to a JSP file, the request will pass the filter twice.

While, in the second way, the request will pass the filter only once.

I prefer the second way, because it is more similar to default behavior in the Servlet specification.

You can see more test log here: https://www.surasint.com/spring-boot-webfilter-instead-of-component/

5
  • I've seen Filter interface getting called numerous times during the launch of the applicationContext. Is there any way to execute it only once ?
    – Pra_A
    Aug 9 '19 at 9:24
  • @PAA you mean from my examples ? Aug 9 '19 at 11:04
  • @Surasin : Great articles on your blog. Question - Instead of \@ServletComponentScan, won't mentioning \@ComponentScan on the filter class along with \@WebFilter be enough for Spring App context to pick it up? Sep 19 '20 at 5:41
  • All the www.surasint.com links are broken ("Hmm. We’re having trouble finding that site. We can’t connect to the server at www.surasint.com."). May 12 at 8:27
  • @PeterMortensen it is gone. Gcloud has completely destroyed it. And I don't have backup anywhere T-T May 12 at 13:41
23

Here is an example of my custom Filter class:

package com.dawson.controller.filter;

import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;
import org.springframework.web.filter.GenericFilterBean;

import javax.servlet.*;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
import java.io.IOException;


@Component
public class DawsonApiFilter extends GenericFilterBean {

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response, FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {
        HttpServletRequest req = (HttpServletRequest) request;
        if (req.getHeader("x-dawson-nonce") == null || req.getHeader("x-dawson-signature") == null) {
            HttpServletResponse httpResponse = (HttpServletResponse) response;
            httpResponse.setContentType("application/json");
            httpResponse.sendError(HttpServletResponse.SC_BAD_REQUEST, "Required headers not specified in the request");
            return;
        }
        chain.doFilter(request, response);
    }
}

And I added it to the Spring Boot configuration by adding it to Configuration class as follows:

package com.dawson.configuration;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.datatype.hibernate5.Hibernate5Module;
import com.dawson.controller.filter.DawsonApiFilter;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.web.servlet.FilterRegistrationBean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.http.converter.json.Jackson2ObjectMapperBuilder;

@SpringBootApplication
public class ApplicationConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public FilterRegistrationBean dawsonApiFilter() {
        FilterRegistrationBean registration = new FilterRegistrationBean();
        registration.setFilter(new DawsonApiFilter());

        // In case you want the filter to apply to specific URL patterns only
        registration.addUrlPatterns("/dawson/*");
        return registration;
    }
}
15

From the Spring documentation,

Embedded servlet containers - Add a Servlet, Filter or Listener to an application

To add a Servlet, Filter, or Servlet *Listener provide a @Bean definition for it.

For example:

@Bean
public Filter compressFilter() {
    CompressingFilter compressFilter = new CompressingFilter();
    return compressFilter;
}

Add this @Bean configuration to your @Configuration class and the filter will be registered on startup.

Also you can add Servlets, Filters, and Listeners using classpath scanning,

@WebServlet, @WebFilter, and @WebListener annotated classes can be automatically registered with an embedded servlet container by annotating a @Configuration class with @ServletComponentScan and specifying the package(s) containing the components that you want to register. By default, @ServletComponentScan will scan from the package of the annotated class.

2
10

We have roughly four different options to register a filter using Spring.

Firstly, we can create a Spring bean implementing Filter or extending HttpFilter:

@Component
public class MyFilter extends HttpFilter {

    @Override
    protected void doFilter(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, FilterChain chain) 
        throws IOException, ServletException {
        // Implementation details...

        chain.doFilter(request, response);
    }
}

Secondly, we can create a Spring bean extending GenericFilterBean:

@Component
public class MyFilter extends GenericFilterBean {

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest servletRequest, ServletResponse servletResponse, FilterChain chain)
  throws IOException, ServletException {
    //Implementation details...

        chain.doFilter(currentRequest, servletResponse);
    }
}

Alternatively we can use the FilterRegistrationBean class:

@Configuration
public class FilterConfiguration {

    private final MyFilter myFilter;

    @Autowired
    public FilterConfiguration(MyFilter myFilter) {
        this.myFilter = myFilter;
    }

    @Bean
    public FilterRegistrationBean<MyFilter> myFilterRegistration() {
        FilterRegistrationBean<DateLoggingFilter> filterRegistrationBean = new FilterRegistrationBean<>();
        filterRegistrationBean.setFilter(myFilter);
        filterRegistrationBean.setUrlPatterns(Collections.singletonList("/*"));
        filterRegistrationBean.setDispatcherTypes(DispatcherType.REQUEST);
        filterRegistrationBean.setOrder(Ordered.LOWEST_PRECEDENCE - 1);
        return filterRegistrationBean;
    }
}

And lastly we can use the @WebFilter annotation with @ServletComponentScan:

@WebFilter(urlPatterns = "/*", dispatcherTypes = {DispatcherType.REQUEST})
public class MyFilter extends HttpFilter {

    @Override
    protected void doFilter(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, FilterChain chain)
  throws IOException, ServletException {
        // Implementation details...

        chain.doFilter(request, response);
    }
}
1
  • Which filter to use and why ?
    – Pra_A
    Aug 9 '19 at 7:03
9

If you use Spring Boot + Spring Security, you can do that in the security configuration.

In the below example, I'm adding a custom filter before the UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter (see all the default Spring Security filters and their order).

@EnableWebSecurity
class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired FilterDependency filterDependency;

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
            .addFilterBefore(
                new MyFilter(filterDependency),
                UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter.class);
    }
}

And the filter class

class MyFilter extends OncePerRequestFilter  {
    private final FilterDependency filterDependency;

    public MyFilter(FilterDependency filterDependency) {
        this.filterDependency = filterDependency;
    }

    @Override
    protected void doFilterInternal(HttpServletRequest request,
        HttpServletResponse response,
        FilterChain filterChain)
        throws ServletException, IOException {

        // Filter
        filterChain.doFilter(request, response);
    }
}
7

Using the @WebFilter annotation, it can be done as follows:

@WebFilter(urlPatterns = {"/*" })
public class AuthenticationFilter implements Filter{

    private static Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(AuthenticationFilter.class);

    @Override
    public void destroy() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest arg0, ServletResponse response, FilterChain chain)
            throws IOException, ServletException {

         logger.info("checking client id in filter");
        HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) arg0;
        String clientId = request.getHeader("clientId");
        if (StringUtils.isNotEmpty(clientId)) {
            chain.doFilter(request, response);
        } else {
            logger.error("client id missing.");
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig arg0) throws ServletException {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }

}
1
4

This filter will also help you to allow cross origin access

@Component
@Order(Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE)
public class SimpleCORSFilter implements Filter {

    public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {

            HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;
            HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) req;
            response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
            response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST, GET, OPTIONS, DELETE");
            response.setHeader("Access-Control-Max-Age", "20000");
            response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "x-requested-with, authorization, Content-Type, Authorization, credential, X-XSRF-TOKEN");

            if("OPTIONS".equalsIgnoreCase(request.getMethod())) {
                response.setStatus(HttpServletResponse.SC_OK);
            } else {
                chain.doFilter(req, res);
            }
    }


    public void destroy() {}

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig arg0) throws ServletException {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }

}
3

It's more an advice than an answer, but if you are using a Spring MVC in your web application the good idea is to use Spring HandlerInterceptor instead of Filter.

It can do the same job, but also

  • Can work with ModelAndView
  • Its methods can be called before and after request processing, or after request completion.
  • It can be easily tested

1. Implement HandlerInterceptor interface and add a @Component annotation to your class

@Component
public class SecurityInterceptor implements HandlerInterceptor {

    private static Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SecurityInterceptor.class);

    @Override
    public boolean preHandle(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Object handler) throws Exception {
        request.getSession(true);
        if(isLoggedIn(request))
            return true;

        response.getWriter().write("{\"loggedIn\":false}");
        return false;
    }

    private boolean isLoggedIn(HttpServletRequest request) {
        try {
            UserSession userSession = (UserSession) request.getSession(true).getAttribute("userSession");
            return userSession != null && userSession.isLoggedIn();
        } catch(IllegalStateException ex) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void postHandle(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Object handler, @Nullable ModelAndView modelAndView) throws Exception {

    }

    @Override
    public void afterCompletion(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Object handler, @Nullable Exception ex) throws Exception {

    }
}

2. Configure your Interceptor

@Configuration
public class WebConfig implements WebMvcConfigurer {

    private HandlerInterceptor securityInterceptor;

    @Autowired
    public void setSecurityInterceptor(HandlerInterceptor securityInterceptor) {
        this.securityInterceptor = securityInterceptor;
    }

    @Override
    public void addInterceptors(InterceptorRegistry registry) {
        registry.addInterceptor(securityInterceptor).addPathPatterns("/**").excludePathPatterns("/login", "/logout");
    }

}
1
  • Simple and elegant! Thanks Aug 7 '19 at 2:47
3

You need two main things:

  • Add @ServletComponentScan to your Main Class

  • You may add a package named filter inside it. You create a Filter class that has the following:

      @Component
      @Order(Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE)
      public class RequestFilter implements Filter {
    
          // whatever field you have
    
          public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain chain) {
              HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;
              HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) req;
    
              // Whatever implementation you want
    
              try {
                  chain.doFilter(req, res);
              } catch(Exception e) {
                  e.printStackTrace();
              }
          }
    
          public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) {
          }
    
          public void destroy() {
          }
      }
    
3

Step 1: Create a filter component by implementing the Filter interface.

@Component
public class PerformanceFilter implements Filter {

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response, FilterChain chain)
            throws IOException, ServletException {

        ...
        ...
    }

}

Step 2: Set this filter to the URI patterns using FilterRegistrationBean.

@Configuration
public class FilterConfig {
    @Bean
    public FilterRegistrationBean<PerformanceFilter> perfFilter() {
        FilterRegistrationBean<PerformanceFilter> registration = new FilterRegistrationBean<>();
        registration.setFilter(new PerformanceFilter());
        registration.addUrlPatterns("/*");
        return registration;
    }
}

You can refer to this link for a complete application.

2

You can use @WebFilter javax.servlet.annotation.WebFilter on a class that implements javax.servlet.Filter:

@WebFilter(urlPatterns = "/*")
public class MyFilter implements Filter {
}

Then use @ServletComponentScan to register.

2

I saw a lot of answers here, but I didn't try any of them. I've just created the filter as in the following code.

import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import javax.servlet.*;
import javax.servlet.annotation.WebFilter;
import java.io.IOException;

@WebFilter(urlPatterns = "/Admin")
@Configuration
public class AdminFilter implements Filter{
    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) throws ServletException {

    }

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest servletRequest, ServletResponse  servletResponse, FilterChain filterChain) throws IOException, ServletException      {
    System.out.println("happened");

    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {

    }
}

And I left the remaining Spring Boot application as it was.

2

Use:

@WebFilter(urlPatterns="/*")
public class XSSFilter implements Filter {

    private static final org.apache.log4j.Logger LOGGER = LogManager.getLogger(XSSFilter.class);

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) throws ServletException {
        LOGGER.info("Initiating XSSFilter... ");
    }

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response, FilterChain chain)
            throws IOException, ServletException {
        HttpServletRequest req = (HttpServletRequest) request;
        HttpRequestWrapper requestWrapper = new HttpRequestWrapper(req);
        chain.doFilter(requestWrapper, response);
    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {
        LOGGER.info("Destroying XSSFilter... ");
    }

}
1
  • This @WebFilter is only since Servlet 3.0. So it might not work properly for 2.5
    – ha9u63ar
    Dec 9 '19 at 0:54
1

You can also make a filter by using @WebFilter and implementing Filter. It will do.

@Configuration
public class AppInConfig
{
    @Bean
    @Order(1)
    public FilterRegistrationBean aiFilterRegistration()
    {
        FilterRegistrationBean registration = new FilterRegistrationBean();
        registration.setFilter(new TrackingFilter());
        registration.addUrlPatterns("/**");
        registration.setOrder(1);
        return registration;
    }

    @Bean(name = "TrackingFilter")
    public Filter TrackingFilter()
    {
        return new TrackingFilter();
    }
}
1

I saw the answer by Vasily Komarov. Here is a similar approach, but using abstract HandlerInterceptorAdapter class instead of using HandlerInterceptor.

Here is an example...

@Component
public class CustomInterceptor extends HandlerInterceptorAdapter {
    @Override
    public boolean preHandle(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Object handler)
        throws Exception {
    }
}

@Configuration
public class InterceptorConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired
    private CustomInterceptor customInterceptor ;

    @Override
    public void addInterceptors(InterceptorRegistry registry) {
        registry.addInterceptor(customInterceptor );
    }

}
1

Filters, as the name suggest, used to perform filtering on either the request to a resource or on the response from a resource, or both. Spring Boot provides a few options to register custom filters in the Spring Boot application. Let’s look at the different options.

1. Define Spring Boot filter and invocation order

Implement the Filter interface to create a new filter in Spring Boot.

@Configuration
@Order(Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE)
public class CustomFilter implements Filter {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(CustomFilter.class);

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) throws ServletException {
        LOGGER.info("########## Initiating Custom filter ##########");
    }

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest servletRequest,
                         ServletResponse servletResponse,
                         FilterChain filterChain)
                         throws IOException, ServletException {

        HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) servletRequest;
        HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) servletResponse;

        LOGGER.info("Logging Request  {} : {}", request.getMethod(), request.getRequestURI());

        // Call next filter in the filter chain
        filterChain.doFilter(request, response);

        LOGGER.info("Logging Response :{}", response.getContentType());
    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {
        // TODO: 7/4/2018
    }
}

Let’s quickly look at some important points in the above code

  • The filter registered by the @Component annotation.

  • To fire filters in the right order, we needed to use the @Order annotation.

     @Component
     @Order(1)
     public class CustomFirstFilter implements Filter {
    
     }
    
     @Component
     @Order(2)
     public class CustomSecondFilter implements Filter {
    
     }
    

In the above code, CustomFirstFilter will run before the CustomSecondFilter.

The lower the number, the higher the precedence

2. URL Pattern

If the convention-based mapping is not flexible enough, we can use FilterRegistrationBean for the complete control of the application. Here, don’t use @Component annotation for the filter class but register the filter using a FilterRegistrationBean.

public class CustomURLFilter implements Filter {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(CustomURLFilter.class);

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) throws ServletException {
        LOGGER.info("########## Initiating CustomURLFilter filter ##########");
    }

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest servletRequest, ServletResponse servletResponse, FilterChain filterChain) throws IOException, ServletException {

        HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) servletRequest;
        HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) servletResponse;

        LOGGER.info("This Filter is only called when request is mapped for /customer resource");

        // Call the next filter in the filter chain
        filterChain.doFilter(request, response);
    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {

    }
}

Register the custom Filter using FilterRegistrationBean.

@Configuration
public class AppConfig {

    @Bean
    public FilterRegistrationBean < CustomURLFilter > filterRegistrationBean() {
        FilterRegistrationBean < CustomURLFilter > registrationBean = new FilterRegistrationBean();
        CustomURLFilter customURLFilter = new CustomURLFilter();

        registrationBean.setFilter(customURLFilter);
        registrationBean.addUrlPatterns("/greeting/*");
        registrationBean.setOrder(2); // Set precedence
        return registrationBean;
    }
}
0

First, add @ServletComponentScan to your SpringBootApplication class.

@ServletComponentScan
public class Application {

Second, create a filter file extending Filter or third-party filter class and add @WebFilter to this file like this:

@Order(1) //optional
@WebFilter(filterName = "XXXFilter", urlPatterns = "/*",
    dispatcherTypes = {DispatcherType.REQUEST, DispatcherType.FORWARD},
    initParams = {@WebInitParam(name = "confPath", value = "classpath:/xxx.xml")})
public class XXXFilter extends Filter{
0

As you all know, Spring Boot is a wonderful way of developing a web application or stand-alone application with minimum configuration and opinionated setup.

This is how I have achieved a web filter development in a Spring Boot application

My SpringBootApp specifications:

Spring Boot version: 2.0.4.RELEASE
Java version: 8.0
Servlet specification: Servlet 3.0 (Mandatory and Important)

I declared my web filter in the following manner, adhering to the Servlet specification 3.0

Enter image description here

This is the programmatic way of defining a filter as a replacement to web.xml-based definitions.

The "@Webfilter" annotation will be processed by the container during deployment. The Filter class, in which it is found, will be created as per the configuration and applied to the URL patterns, javax.servlet.Servlets and javax.servlet.DispatcherTypes.

To avoid Web.xml completely and to achieve "Deployable" WebApp:

To deploy a Spring Boot application as "Traditional WAR", the application class should extend SpringBootServletInitializer.

NOTE:

SpringBootServletInitializer is a "programmatic implementation" of web.xml with reference to the Servlet 3.0+ specifications, which requires an implementation of WebApplicationInitializer.

Thus, SpringBootApplication doesn't require "web.xml" as its application class (after extending SpringBootServletInitializer). It scans for

  • @WebFilter,
  • @WebListener and
  • @WebServlet.

Annotation @ServletComponentScan

This annotation enables scanning base packages for the web components annotated with @WebFilter, @WebListener and @WebServlet.

Due to the fact that embedded containers do not support @WebServlet, @WebFilter and @WebListener annotations, Spring Boot, relying greatly on embedded containers, introduced this new annotation @ServletComponentScan to support some dependent JAR files that use these three annotations.

Scanning is only performed when using an embedded Servlet container.

The following is my Spring Boot application class definition:

Enter image description here

Custom Servlet Initializer:

Here: I have defined a custom class: "ServletInitializer" which extends Class: SpringBootServletInitializer.

As explained earlier, SpringBootServletInitializer is responsible for scanning annotations:

  • @WebFilter,
  • @WebListener and
  • @WebServlet.

And hence the Spring Boot application class should

  • Either extend the class: SpringBootServletInitializer or
  • extend the custom class which extends the class: SpringBootServletInitializer

Enter image description here

0

For Spring Boot in any configuration class I've done:

@Bean
public OncePerRequestFilter myFilter() {
    return new OncePerRequestFilter() {
        @Override
        protected void doFilterInternal(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, FilterChain filterChain) throws ServletException, IOException {
            AuthUser authUser = SecurityUtil.safeGet(); // applied after secutiry filters
            ...
            filterChain.doFilter(request, response);
        }
    };
}

That's all, no any registration needed. See also What is OncePerRequestFilter?

-6

Filters are mostly used in logger files. It varies according to the logger you using in the project.

Let me explain for log4j2:

<Filters>
    <!-- It prevents an error -->
    <ThresholdFilter level="error" onMatch="DENY" onMismatch="NEUTRAL"/>

    <!-- It prevents debug -->
    <ThresholdFilter level="debug" onMatch="DENY" onMismatch="NEUTRAL" />

    <!-- It allows all levels except debug/trace -->
    <ThresholdFilter level="info" onMatch="ACCEPT" onMismatch="DENY" />
</Filters>

Filters are used to restrict the data and I used the threshold filter further to restrict the levels of data in the flow. I mentioned the levels that can be restricted over there.

For your further reference, see the level order of log4j2 - Log4J Levels: ALL > TRACE > DEBUG > INFO > WARN > ERROR > FATAL > OFF

1
  • 1
    FilterRegistrationBean as mentioned in the question is for javax.servlet.Filter, this answer talks about org.apache.logging.log4j.core.Filter Mar 19 '18 at 3:37

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