So I have this class:

public class Foo<T> where T : ???
{
    private T item;

    public bool IsNull()
    {
        return item == null;
    }

}

Now I am looking for a type constraint that allows me to use everything as type parameter that can be null. That means all reference types, as well as all the Nullable (T?) types:

Foo<String> ... = ...
Foo<int?> ... = ...

should be possible.

Using class as the type constraint only allows me to use the reference types.

Additional Information: I am writing a pipes and filters application, and want to use a null reference as the last item that passes into the pipeline, so that every filter can shut down nicely, do cleanup, etc...

  • 1
    @Tim that doesn't allow for Nullables – Rik Nov 7 '13 at 8:36
  • This link may help you : social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/… – Réda Mattar Nov 7 '13 at 8:37
  • 2
    It's not possible to do this directly. Perhaps you can tell us more about your scenario? Or perhaps you could use IFoo<T> as the working type and create instances through a factory method? That could be made to work. – Jon Nov 7 '13 at 8:50
  • I'm not sure why you would want or need to constrain something this way. If your only intent is to turn "if x == null" into if x.IsNull()" this seems pointless and unintuitive to the 99.99% of developers who are used to the former syntax. The compiler won't let you do "if (int)x == null" anyway, so you're already covered. – RJ Lohan Nov 7 '13 at 8:54
  • 1
    This is pretty widely discussed on SO. stackoverflow.com/questions/209160/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/13794554/… – Maxim Gershkovich Nov 7 '13 at 8:58

If you are willing to make a runtime check in Foo's constructor rather than having a compile-time check, you can check if the type is not a reference or nullable type, and throw an exception if that's the case.

I realise that only having a runtime check may be unacceptable, but just in case:

public class Foo<T>
{
    private T item;

    public Foo()
    {
        var type = typeof(T);

        if (Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) != null)
            return;

        if (type.IsClass)
            return;

        throw new InvalidOperationException("Type is not nullable or reference type.");
    }

    public bool IsNull()
    {
        return item == null;
    }
}

Then the following code compiles, but the last one (foo3) throws an exception in the constructor:

var foo1 = new Foo<int?>();
Console.WriteLine(foo1.IsNull());

var foo2 = new Foo<string>();
Console.WriteLine(foo2.IsNull());

var foo3= new Foo<int>();  // THROWS
Console.WriteLine(foo3.IsNull());
  • 20
    If you're going to do this, make sure you do the check in the static constructor, otherwise you'll be slowing down the construction of every instance of your generic class (unnecessarily) – Eamon Nerbonne Apr 5 '14 at 9:24
  • @EamonNerbonne You should not raise exceptions from static constructors: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb386039.aspx – Matthew Watson Mar 16 '17 at 10:30
  • 2
    Guidelines aren't absolutes. If you want this check, you're going to have to trade-off the cost of a runtime check vs. the unhandiness of exceptions in a static constructor. Since you're really implementing a poor-mans static analyzer here, this exception should never be thrown except during development. Finally, even if you want to avoid static construction exceptions at all costs (unwise), then you should still do as much work as possible statically and as little as possible in the instance constructor - e.g. by setting a flag "isBorked" or whatever. – Eamon Nerbonne Mar 25 '17 at 13:08
  • Incidentally, I don't think you should try to do this at all. In most circumstances I'd prefer to just accept this as a C# limitation, rather than try and work with a leaky, failure-prone abstraction. E.g. a different solution might be to just require classes, or just require structs (and explicitly make em nullable) - or do both and have two versions. That's not a criticism of this solution; it's just that this problem cannot be solved well - unless, that is, you're willing to write a custom roslyn analyzer. – Eamon Nerbonne Mar 25 '17 at 13:16

I don't know how to implement equivalent to OR in generics. However I can propose to use default key word in order to create null for nullable types and 0 value for structures:

public class Foo<T>
{
    private T item;

    public bool IsNullOrDefault()
    {
        return Equals(item, default(T));
    }
}

You could also implement you version of Nullable:

class MyNullable<T> where T : struct
{
    public T Value { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator T(MyNullable<T> value)
    {
        return value != null ? value.Value : default(T);
    }

    public static implicit operator MyNullable<T>(T value)
    {
        return new MyNullable<T> { Value = value };
    }
}

class Foo<T> where T : class
{
    public T Item { get; set; }

    public bool IsNull()
    {
        return Item == null;
    }
}

Example:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(new Foo<MyNullable<int>>().IsNull()); // true
        Console.WriteLine(new Foo<MyNullable<int>> {Item = 3}.IsNull()); // false
        Console.WriteLine(new Foo<object>().IsNull()); // true
        Console.WriteLine(new Foo<object> {Item = new object()}.IsNull()); // false

        var foo5 = new Foo<MyNullable<int>>();
        int integer = foo5.Item;
        Console.WriteLine(integer); // 0

        var foo6 = new Foo<MyNullable<double>>();
        double real = foo6.Item;
        Console.WriteLine(real); // 0

        var foo7 = new Foo<MyNullable<double>>();
        foo7.Item = null;
        Console.WriteLine(foo7.Item); // 0
        Console.WriteLine(foo7.IsNull()); // true
        foo7.Item = 3.5;
        Console.WriteLine(foo7.Item); // 3.5
        Console.WriteLine(foo7.IsNull()); // false

        // var foo5 = new Foo<int>(); // Not compile
    }
}
  • The original Nullable<T> in the framework is a struct, not a class. I don't think it's a good idea to create a reference type wrapper that will mimic a value type. – Niall Connaughton Feb 9 '15 at 11:32
  • 1
    The first suggestion using default is perfect! Now my template with a generic type being returned can return a null for objects and the default value for built-in types. – Casey Anderson Aug 3 '16 at 18:50

I ran into this issue for a simpler case of wanting a generic static method that could take anything "nullable" (either reference types or Nullables), which brought me to this question with no satisfactory solution. So I came up with my own solution which was relatively easier to solve than the OP's stated question by simply having two overloaded methods, one that takes a T and has the constraint where T : class and another that takes a T? and has where T : struct .

I then realized, that solution can also be applied to this problem to create a solution that is checkable at compile time by making the constructor private (or protected) and using a static factory method:

    //this class is to avoid having to supply generic type arguments 
    //to the static factory call (see CA1000)
    public static class Foo
    {
        public static Foo<TFoo> Create<TFoo>(TFoo value)
            where TFoo : class
        {
            return Foo<TFoo>.Create(value);
        }

        public static Foo<TFoo?> Create<TFoo>(TFoo? value)
            where TFoo : struct
        {
            return Foo<TFoo?>.Create(value);
        }
    }

    public class Foo<T>
    {
        private T item;

        private Foo(T value)
        {
            item = value;
        }

        public bool IsNull()
        {
            return item == null;
        }

        internal static Foo<TFoo> Create<TFoo>(TFoo value)
            where TFoo : class
        {
            return new Foo<TFoo>(value);
        }

        internal static Foo<TFoo?> Create<TFoo>(TFoo? value)
            where TFoo : struct
        {
            return new Foo<TFoo?>(value);
        }
    }

Now we can use it like this:

        var foo1 = new Foo<int>(1); //does not compile
        var foo2 = Foo.Create(2); //does not compile
        var foo3 = Foo.Create(""); //compiles
        var foo4 = Foo.Create(new object()); //compiles
        var foo5 = Foo.Create((int?)5); //compiles

If you want a parameterless constructor, you won't get the nicety of overloading, but you can still do something like this:

    public static class Foo
    {
        public static Foo<TFoo> Create<TFoo>()
            where TFoo : class
        {
            return Foo<TFoo>.Create<TFoo>();
        }

        public static Foo<TFoo?> CreateNullable<TFoo>()
            where TFoo : struct
        {
            return Foo<TFoo?>.CreateNullable<TFoo>();
        }
    }

    public class Foo<T>
    {
        private T item;

        private Foo()
        {
        }

        public bool IsNull()
        {
            return item == null;
        }

        internal static Foo<TFoo> Create<TFoo>()
            where TFoo : class
        {
            return new Foo<TFoo>();
        }

        internal static Foo<TFoo?> CreateNullable<TFoo>()
            where TFoo : struct
        {
            return new Foo<TFoo?>();
        }
    }

And use it like this:

        var foo1 = new Foo<int>(); //does not compile
        var foo2 = Foo.Create<int>(); //does not compile
        var foo3 = Foo.Create<string>(); //compiles
        var foo4 = Foo.Create<object>(); //compiles
        var foo5 = Foo.CreateNullable<int>(); //compiles

There are few disadvantages to this solution, one is that you may prefer using 'new' to construct objects. Another is that you won't be able to use Foo<T> as a generic type argument for a type constraint of something like: where TFoo: new(). Finally is the bit of extra code you need here which would increase especially if you need multiple overloaded constructors.

Such a type constraint is not possible. According to the documentation of type constraints there is not constraint that captures both the nullable and the reference types. Since constraints can only be combined in a conjunction, there is no way to create such a constraint by combination.

You can, however, for your needs fall back to an unconstraint type parameter, since you can always check for == null. If the type is a value type the check will just always evaluate to false. Then you'll possibly get the R# warning "Possible compare of value type with null", which is not critical, as long as the semantics is right for you.

An alternative could be to use

object.Equals(value, default(T))

instead of the null check, since default(T) where T : class is always null. This, however, means that you cannot distinguish weather a non-nullable value has never been set explicitly or was just set to its default value.

  • I think that the problem is how to check that value have never be set. Different than null seems to point that value have been initialized. – Ryszard Dżegan Nov 7 '13 at 8:58
  • That does not invalidate the approach, since value types are always set (at least implicitly to their respective default value). – Sven Amann Nov 7 '13 at 8:59

As mentioned, you cannot have a compile-time check for it. Generic constraints in .NET are severely lacking, and do not support most scenarios.

However I consider this to be a better solution for run-time checking. It can be optimized at JIT compilation time, since they're both constants.

public class SomeClass<T>
{
    public SomeClass()
    {
        // JIT-compile time check, so it doesn't even have to evaluate.
        if (default(T) != null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("SomeClass<T> requires T to be a nullable type.");

        T variable;
        // This still won't compile
        // variable = null;
        // but because you know it's a nullable type, this works just fine
        variable = default(T);
    }
}

I use

public class Foo<T> where T: struct
{
    private T? item;
}
    public class Foo<T>
    {
        private T item;

        public Foo(T item)
        {
            this.item = item;
        }

        public bool IsNull()
        {
            return object.Equals(item, null);
        }
    }

    var fooStruct = new Foo<int?>(3);
        var b = fooStruct.IsNull();

        var fooStruct1 = new Foo<int>(3);
        b = fooStruct1.IsNull();

        var fooStruct2 = new Foo<int?>(null);
        b = fooStruct2.IsNull();

        var fooStruct3 = new Foo<string>("qqq");
        b = fooStruct3.IsNull();

        var fooStruct4 = new Foo<string>(null);
        b = fooStruct4.IsNull();
  • This typing allows new Foo<int>(42) and IsNull() will return false, which, whilst semantically correct, is not particularly meaningful. – RJ Lohan Nov 7 '13 at 9:05
  • 42 is not null, all correct – SeeSharp Nov 7 '13 at 9:12
  • 1
    42 is "The Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything". Simply put: IsNull for every int value will return false (even for 0 value). – Ryszard Dżegan Nov 7 '13 at 9:31

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