1
double a = 135.24;          // a is set to 135.24000000000001 actually
double b = Math.Round(a, 0);    // set to 135.0
double c = Math.Round(a, 1);    // set to 135.19999999999999
double d = Math.Round(a, 2);    // set to 135.24000000000001 
double e = Math.Round(a, 3);    // set to 135.24000000000001 
double f = Math.Round(a, 4);    // set to 135.24000000000001 
double g = Math.Round(a, 5);    // set to 135.24000000000001 
double h = Math.Round(a, 10);   // set to 135.24000000000001 
double i = Math.Round(a, 14);   // set to 135.24000000000001 


double j = Math.Round(a, 2
 , MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero ); // set to 135.24000000000001 
double k = Math.Round(a, 2
 , MidpointRounding.ToEven );   // set to 135.24000000000001 

Sooooo, this means that 135.24 cannot be represented with a double, right?

4
  • 8
    I just prefer to believe the number 135.24 doesn't exist Nov 7, 2013 at 10:27
  • Rounding to one digit (135.2) is not representable in binary. The nearest representable value is 135.199 recurring. Rounding to two digits and beyond will round to 135.24 which is not representable in binary either (135.2400...01). I find h-schmidt.net/FloatConverter helpful.
    – Caramiriel
    Nov 7, 2013 at 10:28
  • As a side note: double doesn't represent whole numbers bigger than 252 correctly. float has the precision limit 223 so (float)Math.Pow(2,24) == 16777217 Go ahead and try it! Nov 7, 2013 at 14:25
  • Math.Pow(2,53) + 1 == Math.Pow(2,53) and so on. Nov 7, 2013 at 14:36

5 Answers 5

5

Yes, 135.24 cannot be represented by double since double uses binary exponential notation.

That is: 135.24 can be represented exponentially in base of 2 as 1.0565625 * 128 = ( 1 + 1/32 + 1/64 + 1/128 + 1/1024 + ... ) * (2**7).

The representation cannot be done exactly, because 13524 does not divide by 5. Let's look:

135.24 = 13524/(10**2)

representation is finite <=> exist whole x and n satisfying 135.24 = x/(2**n)

135.24 = x/(2**n)
13524 / (10**2) = x / (2**n)
13524 * (2**n) = (10**2) * x
13524 * (2**n) = 2*2*5*5 * x

there is no "5" on the left side, so it cannot be done (known as the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic)

In general, finite binary representation is exact only if there is sufficient number of "fives" in prime factorization of the decimal number.

Now the fun part:

    double delta = 0.5;
    while( 1 + delta > 1 )
        delta /= 2;

    Console.WriteLine( delta );

Precision of double is different near 1, different near 0, and different for some big numbers. Some binary representation examples on Wikipedia: Double precision floating point format

But the most important thing is that internal processor floating-point stack may have much better precision than 8 bytes (double). If number does not have to be transferred to RAM and stripped down to 8 bytes we can get a really nice precision.

Testing something like this on different processors (AMD, Intel), languages (C, C++, C#, Java) or compiler optimization levels can give results can be around 1e-16, 1e-20, or even 1e-320

Take a look at CIL / assembler / jasmin code to see exactly what is going on (eg: for C++ g++ -S test.cpp creates test.s file with assembler code in it)

4

That is generally a problem with floating point numbers. If you need an exact representation of numbers (e.g. for billing, ...) then you should use Decimal. Try following piece of code and you will see that you do not have the output 0, 0.1, 0.2, ... 1.0.

for(double i = 0; i <= 1.0; i += 0.001)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}
1
  • Decimal can represent exactly only decimal numbers, like 3434.1234m/25m, but if you happen to divide by 3 you can end up with 0.3333... (28 digits 3). Not exact, but greater precision than double, which has around 15 significant digits. Nov 8, 2013 at 9:18
3

Try using decimal instead. Floating points are not very precise (thus some numbers can't be represented) :)

3
  • 4
    precise isn't necessarily the right word; they very precisely represent the values that can be stored in their encoding Nov 7, 2013 at 10:29
  • Sorry, that would have been a better way to put it indeed. They are very precise according to their possibilities :) Nov 7, 2013 at 15:29
  • In decimal also many numbers can't be represented, 2/3 for example. Actually there is only one important difference: decimal uses decimal (obviously), double uses binary. Since 10 divides by 2 and 5, decimal can represent 3/5 exactly, double can represent only numbers like 1/8. Nov 8, 2013 at 9:38
0

Yes, it cannot. This is why there's another nonintegra datatype called decimal. It takes different amount of memory and has different min/max numerical ranges than double, and is NOT bit-convertible*) to double, but in turn it can held numbers precisely without any distortions.

*) That is, you cannot i.e. copy it as bytes and push to C++ code. However, you can still cast it to double and back. Just mind that the cast will NOT be precise, as double cannot hold some numbers that decimal can, and vice versa

0

You can see the definition.The Round function defined as-

public static double Round(double value, int digits, MidpointRounding mode)
    {
      if (digits < 0 || digits > 15)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("digits", Environment.GetResourceString("ArgumentOutOfRange_RoundingDigits"));
      if (mode >= MidpointRounding.ToEven && mode <= MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero)
        return Math.InternalRound(value, digits, mode);
      throw new ArgumentException(Environment.GetResourceString("Argument_InvalidEnumValue", (object) mode, (object) "MidpointRounding"), "mode");
    }


private static unsafe double InternalRound(double value, int digits, MidpointRounding mode)
    {
      if (Math.Abs(value) < Math.doubleRoundLimit)
      {
        double num1 = Math.roundPower10Double[digits];
        value *= num1;
        if (mode == MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero)
        {
          double num2 = Math.SplitFractionDouble(&value);
          if (Math.Abs(num2) >= 0.5)
            value += (double) Math.Sign(num2);
        }
        else
          value = Math.Round(value);
        value /= num1;
      }
      return value;
    }

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