46

I have a batch-script with multiple arguments. I am reading the total count of them and then run a for loop like this:

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion

set argCount=0
for %%x in (%*) do set /A argCount+=1
echo Number of processed arguments: %argCount%

set /a counter=0
for /l %%x in (1, 1, %argCount%) do (
set /a counter=!counter!+1 )

What I want to do now, is to use my running variable (x or counter) to access the input arguments. I am thinking aobut something like this:

REM Access to %1 
echo %(!counter!)

In an ideal world this line should print out my first command line argument but obviously it doesn't. I know I am doing something wrong with the % operator, but is there anyway I could access my arguments like this?

//edit: Just to make things clear - the problem is that %(!counter!) provides me with the value of the variable counter. Meaning for counter=2 it gives me 2 and not the content of %2.

4
  • if the arguments are more than 9 you can't access all of them without shift
    – npocmaka
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 12:29
  • This is another issue I might encounter, but let's just assume that I will have less than 10 arguments
    – Toby
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 12:30
  • 5
    Also, for %%x in (%*) do ... will not give the desired result if any parameter contains * or ? character. I always use a GOTO loop with SHIFT if I want to load the parameters into an array of variables.
    – dbenham
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 16:08
  • If one of the arguments contains a wildcard character, e.g. "file*.txt" then it is not processed. Any idea how to fix?
    – David Hyde
    Commented Mar 1, 2023 at 10:09

6 Answers 6

77
@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion

set argCount=0
for %%x in (%*) do (
   set /A argCount+=1
   set "argVec[!argCount!]=%%~x"
)

echo Number of processed arguments: %argCount%

for /L %%i in (1,1,%argCount%) do echo %%i- "!argVec[%%i]!"

For example:

C:> test One "This is | the & second one" Third
Number of processed arguments: 3
1- "One"
2- "This is | the & second one"
3- "Third"

Another one:

C:> test One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Ten Eleven Twelve etc...
Number of processed arguments: 13
1- "One"
2- "Two"
3- "Three"
4- "Four"
5- "Five"
6- "Six"
7- "Seven"
8- "Eight"
9- "Nine"
10- "Ten"
11- "Eleven"
12- "Twelve"
13- "etc..."
6
  • 1
    Tthis one is working as is, for me, unlike current solution from @npocmaka (windows 10 familly) Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 15:38
  • 1
    A little more context on how the whole thing works would be nice, but the solutions does what it says on the thin, I give you that. :-)
    – M463
    Commented Mar 5, 2020 at 15:47
  • This has trouble when the argument has some format, e.g. this link: https://www.tagesschau.de/investigativ/ndr-wdr/spaeh-software-pegasus-projekt-101.html. I can't name the exact problem, but it doesn't even count this argument. It probably also has problems if one of the argument contains *.
    – Cadoiz
    Commented Jul 22, 2021 at 16:28
  • Be aware that this needs the delayed expansion (setlocal enableDelayedExpansion), which my preferred answer doesn't.
    – Cadoiz
    Commented Aug 2, 2021 at 12:23
  • This answer splits on semicolons. Calling with "One;Two" will output two lines "One" and "Two". Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 9:23
38
:loop
@echo %1
shift
if not "%~1"=="" goto loop
7
  • 5
    Where are the better answers? I like this one because it is super succinct, minimal, and straightforward.
    – Jay Taylor
    Commented Sep 30, 2016 at 17:12
  • 4
    What I think @jeb is trying to say is that you should provide an explanation for your answer. I think it's great, but with details on what each command does, and maybe a usage example, you'll get more upvotes :) Commented Oct 3, 2016 at 22:59
  • 1
    This answer works when the arguments contain special characters like * but iterates one time too many when there are no arguments.
    – Arnaud
    Commented Feb 22, 2020 at 21:25
  • Very helpful information @Arnaud, thank you for explaining the issue and shedding light on this!
    – Jay Taylor
    Commented Mar 11, 2020 at 15:43
  • 1
    This breaks when an empty argument "" is in the mix, skipping anything after. Also, I can't get this version to preserve equals signs :( Commented Jul 5, 2022 at 14:35
14

here's one way to access the second (e.g.) argument (this can be put in a for /l loop, see below.):

@echo off
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
set /a counter=2
call echo %%!counter!
endlocal

so:

setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
set /a counter=0
for /l %%x in (1, 1, %argCount%) do (
 set /a counter=!counter!+1
 call echo %%!counter! 
)
endlocal
10
  • Ok I need to ask, even if it may obvious and I am just having a blackout: Is there any way how I can get that value into a variable now? Now that I have read the Input paramaeters I want to compare them with some strings. And I am not quite sure how I can access that string now...?
    – Toby
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 13:33
  • with call set "_var=%%!counter!".you need a temp variable because if cannot be called
    – npocmaka
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 13:37
  • and then you can compare with if -> if "!_var!" equ "something" echo this is something
    – npocmaka
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 13:41
  • Are you sure that I have to put the " around the whole set call?
    – Toby
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 13:45
  • it is a safe strategy. this allows you to include special characters in the value like |&><.... and will ensure you that there is no extra space at the end (which in some cases could break your logic)
    – npocmaka
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 13:46
12

If to keep the code short rather than wise, then

for %%x in (%*) do (
   echo Hey %%~x 
)
3
  • Is this approach unwise? And if so, why?
    – isapir
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 22:13
  • 4
    @isapir This approach will fail if one of the argument contains * as I just learned the hard way.
    – Arnaud
    Commented Feb 22, 2020 at 21:16
  • this one is more understandable than @JayTaylor's answer. stackoverflow.com/a/39776524/209942
    – johny why
    Commented Nov 19, 2021 at 10:44
2
@ECHO OFF
SETLOCAL
SET nparms=0
FOR /l %%i IN (1,1,20) DO (
 SET myparm=%%i
 CALL :setparm %*
 IF DEFINED myparm SET nparms=%%i&CALL ECHO Parameter %%i=%%myparm%%
)
ECHO there were %nparms% parameters in %*
GOTO :EOF

:setparm
IF %myparm%==1 SET myparm=%1&GOTO :EOF
shift&SET /a myparm -=1&GOTO setparm
GOTO :eof

This should show how to extract random parameters by position.

2
  • Are you counting the number of command-line arguments?
    – johny why
    Commented Nov 21, 2021 at 20:02
  • @johnywhy No, that was done in the original post. This demonstration is of how to access any arbitrary parameter by position since for instance %13 to get the 13th parameter will actually tag "3" onto the end of the first parameter (%1) as only a single digit is allowed in this position. The demo shows the first 20 parameters as set by the for/l loop. The number in nparms is actually the last-detected parameter number that was defined. Change the loop to for %%i in (6,3,25,11,9) do and it will report the last parameter number defined of the set (6,3,25,11,9) as nparms
    – Magoo
    Commented Nov 25, 2021 at 23:19
2

For simple iteration can't we just check for additional arguments with "shift /1" at the end of the code and loop back? This will handle more than 10 arguments, upper limit not tested.

:loop

:: Your code using %1
echo %1

:: Check for further batch arguments.     
shift /1
IF [%1]==[] (
goto end
) ELSE (
goto loop
)

:end
pause
0

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