I've read many blogs/articles/book chapters about proper exception handling and still this topic is not clear to me. I will try to illustrate my question with following example.

Consider the class method that has following requirements:

  1. receive list of file paths as parameter
  2. read the file content for each file or skip if there is any problem trying to do that
  3. return list of objects representing file content

So the specs are straightforward and here is how I can start coding:

    public class FileContent
    {
        public string FilePath { get; set; }
        public byte[] Content { get; set; }

        public FileContent(string filePath, byte[] content)
        {
            this.FilePath = filePath;
            this.Content = content;
        }
    }

    static List<FileContent> GetFileContents(List<string> paths)
    {
        var resultList = new List<FileContent>();

        foreach (var path in paths)
        {
            // open file pointed by "path"
            // read file to FileContent object
            // add FileContent to resultList
            // close file
        }

        return resultList;
    }

Now note that the 2. from the specs says that method should "skip any file which content can't be read for some reason". So there could be many different reasons for this to happen (eg. file not existing, file access denied due to lack of security permissions, file being locked and in use by some other application etc...) but the point is that I should not care what the reason is, I just want to read file's content if possible or skip the file if not. I don't care what the error is...

So how to properly implement this method then?

OK the first rule of proper exception handling is never catch general Exception. So this code is not good then:

    static List<FileContent> GetFileContents(List<string> paths)
    {
        var resultList = new List<FileContent>();

        foreach (var path in paths)
        {
            try
            {
                using (FileStream stream = File.Open(path, FileMode.Open))
                using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(stream))
                {
                    int fileLength = (int)stream.Length;
                    byte[] buffer = new byte[fileLength];
                    reader.Read(buffer, 0, fileLength);

                    resultList.Add(new FileContent(path, buffer));
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // this file can't be read, do nothing... just skip the file
            }
        }

        return resultList;
    }

The next rule of proper exception handlig says: catch only specific exceptions you can handle. Well I do not I care about handling any specific exceptions that can be thrown, I just want to check if file can be read or not. How can I do that in a proper, the best-practice way?

  • Your question can't be awnsered without the requirenemts of your system. The awnsers be opinion based, and will not solve your specific case. – Peter Nov 7 '13 at 14:42
  • 1
    Really the first rule of proper exception handling is never catch a general exception? – paparazzo Nov 7 '13 at 14:44
  • @peer: what requirements of the systems you are referring to? Do you mean like whether the application is WPF, console or ASP.NET? Please clarify. – matori82 Nov 7 '13 at 14:50
  • 1
  • If you can check for the exception programatically then you should do that instead of a try/catch block. So you should check if the file exists, check if you have permission to open it, etc. and not use a try/catch block at all here. – Harrison Nov 7 '13 at 15:06
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Although it's generally not considered to be good practice to catch and swallow non-specific exceptions, the risks are often overstated.

After all, ASP.NET will catch a non-specific exception that is thrown during processing of a request, and after wrapping it in an HttpUnhandledException, will redirect to an error page and continue happily on it's way.

In your case, if you want to respect the guideline, you need a complete list of all exceptions that can be thrown. I believe the following list is complete:

UnauthorizedAccessException IOException FileNotFoundException DirectoryNotFoundException PathTooLongException NotSupportedException (path is not in a valid format). SecurityException ArgumentException

You probably won't want to catch SecurityException or ArgumentException, and several of the others derive from IOException, so you'd probably want to catch IOException, NotSupportedException and UnauthorizedAccessException.

  • Could you please write an example code (based on mine from above) that demonstrates your approach? – matori82 Nov 7 '13 at 17:03
  • @matori82 - it's very similar to the sample in bland's answer: stackoverflow.com/a/19839124/13087. Basically a series of empty catch blocks for each exception you want to ignore (in this case: IOException, NotSupportedException and UnauthorizedAccessException). – Joe Nov 7 '13 at 19:53

Your requirements are clear - skip files that cannot be read. So what is the problem with the general exception handler? It allows you to perform your task in a manner that is easy, clean, readable, scalable and maintainable.

If at any future date you want to handle the multiple possible exceptions differently, you can just add above the general exception the catch for the specific one(s).

So you'd rather see the below code? Note, that if you add more code to handle the reading of files, you must add any new exceptions to this list. All this to do nothing?

try
{
    // find, open, read files
}
catch(FileNotFoundException) { }
catch(AccessViolation) { }
catch(...) { }
catch(...) { }
catch(...) { }
catch(...) { }
catch(...) { }
catch(...) { }

Conventions are guidelines and great to try to adhere to to create good code - but do not over-complicate code just to maintain some odd sense of proper etiquette.

To me, proper etiquette is to not talk in bathrooms - ever. But when the boss says hello to you in there, you say hello back. So if you don't care to handle multiple exceptions differently, you don't need to catch each.


Edit: So I recommend the following

try
{
    // find, open, read files
}
catch { } // Ignore any and all exceptions

The above tells me to not care which exception is thrown. By not specifying an exception, even just System.Exception, I've allowed .NET to default to it. So the below is the same exact code.

try
{
    // find, open, read files
}
catch(Exception) { } // Ignore any and all exceptions

Or if you're going to log it at least:

try
{
    // find, open, read files
}
catch(Exception ex) { Logger.Log(ex); }  // Log any and all exceptions
  • So you recommend that I just catch the general Exception like I did in the sample code in the first post? – matori82 Nov 8 '13 at 16:49
  • @matori82 Yes. If you're not even logging this information, then you do not actually need (Exception ex). You can just write catch{} as it defaults to catch(Exception){}. This will go into my post. – bland Nov 8 '13 at 17:03

My solution to this question is usually based on the number of possible exceptions. If there are only a few, I specify catch blocks for each. If there are many possible, I catch all Exceptions. Forcing developers to always catch specific exceptions can make for some very ugly code.

You are mixing different actions in one method, changing your code will make you question easier to awnser:

static List<FileContent> GetFileContents(List<string> paths)
{
    var resultList = new List<FileContent>();

    foreach (var path in paths)
    {
          if (CanReadFile(path){
                resultList.Add(new FileContent(path, buffer));
          }
    return resultList;
}

static bool CanReadFile(string Path){
     try{
         using (FileStream stream = File.Open(path, FileMode.Open))
            using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(stream))
            {
                int fileLength = (int)stream.Length;
                byte[] buffer = new byte[fileLength];
                reader.Read(buffer, 0, fileLength);
            }
     }catch(Exception){ //I do not care what when wrong, error when reading from file
         return false;
     }
     return true;
}

This way the CanReadFile hides the implementation for your check. The only thing you have to think about is if the CanReadFile method is correct, or if it needs errorhandling.

  • I know this is just an example, but that's an awfully expensive way to just check the readability of the file. This is a good reason to test it in the same method. – j.i.h. Nov 7 '13 at 15:32
  • @j.i.h. agreed, I would just try to actually read the file. The file can be locked between it is added to the list and the actual reading of the file, or even removed by an user. However you can choice a diffrent implementation of the CanReadFile method without changing your adding etc, and the CanReadFile can be unittested and stubed. – Peter Nov 7 '13 at 15:38

Something you can consider in this instance is that between the FileNotFoundException, which you can't catch because there are too many of them, and the most general Exception, there is still the layer IOException.

In general you will try to catch your exceptions as specific as possible, but especially if you are catching the exceptions without actually using them to throw an error, you might as well catch a group of exceptions. Even then however you will try to make it as specific as possible

  • Thanks for trying to be helpful and editing my comment, but what you typed there was not at all what I meant. – Voidpaw Nov 7 '13 at 15:48

In my opinion, divide the exceptions up into three types. First are exception you expect and know how to recover. Second are exceptions which you know you can avoid at runtime. Third are those which you don't expect to occur during runtime, but can't avoid or can't realistically handle.

Handle the first type, these are the class of exceptions which are valid to your specific level of abstraction, and which represent valid business cases for recovering at that level (in your case, ignoring.)

The second class of exceptions should be avoided- don't be lazy. The third class of exceptions should be let to pass... you need to make sure you know how to handle a problem, else you may leave your application in a confusing or invalid state.

As others have said, you can handle multiple exceptions by adding more catch blocks to an existing try block, they evaluate in the order they appear, so if you have to handle exceptions which derive from other exceptions, which you also handle, use the more specific one first.

This repeats what is said but hopefully in a way for you to better understand.

You have a logic error in "skip any file which content can't be read for some reason".

If that reason is an error in your code you don't want to skip it.
You only want to skip files that have file related errors.
What if the ctor in FileContent was throwing an error?

And exceptions are expensive.
I would test for FileExists (and still catch exceptions)
And I agree with the exceptions listed by Joe
Come on MSDN has clear examples of how to catch various exceptions

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