31

I am using Java.net at one of my project. and I wrote a App Server that gets inputStream from a client. But some times my (buffered)InputStream can not get all of OutputStream that client sent to my server. How can I write a wait or some thing like that, that my InputStream gets all of the OutputStream of client?

(My InputStream is not a String)

private Socket clientSocket;
private ServerSocket server;
private BufferedOutputStream outputS;
private BufferedInputStream inputS;
private InputStream inBS;
private OutputStream outBS;

server = new ServerSocket(30501, 100);
clientSocket = server.accept();

public void getStreamFromClient()  {
    try {
        outBS = clientSocket.getOutputStream();
        outputS = new BufferedOutputStream( outBS);
        outputS.flush();

        inBS = clientSocket.getInputStream();
        inputS = new BufferedInputStream( inBS );

    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Thanks.

67

The problem you have is related to TCP streaming nature.

The fact that you sent 100 Bytes (for example) from the server doesn't mean you will read 100 Bytes in the client the first time you read. Maybe the bytes sent from the server arrive in several TCP segments to the client.

You need to implement a loop in which you read until the whole message was received. Let me provide an example with DataInputStream instead of BufferedinputStream. Something very simple to give you just an example.

Let's suppose you know beforehand the server is to send 100 Bytes of data.

In client you need to write:

byte[] messageByte = new byte[1000];
boolean end = false;
String dataString = "";

try 
{
    DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());

    while(!end)
    {
        int bytesRead = in.read(messageByte);
        dataString += new String(messageByte, 0, bytesRead);
        if (dataString.length == 100)
        {
            end = true;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("MESSAGE: " + dataString);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Now, typically the data size sent by one node (the server here) is not known beforehand. Then you need to define your own small protocol for the communication between server and client (or any two nodes) communicating with TCP.

The most common and simple is to define TLV: Type, Length, Value. So you define that every message sent form server to client comes with:

  • 1 Byte indicating type (For example, it could also be 2 or whatever).
  • 1 Byte (or whatever) for length of message
  • N Bytes for the value (N is indicated in length).

So you know you have to receive a minimum of 2 Bytes and with the second Byte you know how many following Bytes you need to read.

This is just a suggestion of a possible protocol. You could also get rid of "Type".

So it would be something like:

byte[] messageByte = new byte[1000];
boolean end = false;
String dataString = "";

try 
{
    DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
    int bytesRead = 0;

    messageByte[0] = in.readByte();
    messageByte[1] = in.readByte();

    int bytesToRead = messageByte[1];

    while(!end)
    {
        bytesRead = in.read(messageByte);
        dataString += new String(messageByte, 0, bytesRead);
        if (dataString.length == bytesToRead )
        {
            end = true;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("MESSAGE: " + dataString);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}

The following code compiles and looks better. It assumes the first two bytes providing the length arrive in binary format, in network endianship (big endian). No focus on different encoding types for the rest of the message.

import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.io.DataInputStream;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;

class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        byte[] messageByte = new byte[1000];
        boolean end = false;
        String dataString = "";

        try 
        {
            Socket clientSocket;
            ServerSocket server;

            server = new ServerSocket(30501, 100);
            clientSocket = server.accept();

            DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
            int bytesRead = 0;

            messageByte[0] = in.readByte();
            messageByte[1] = in.readByte();
            ByteBuffer byteBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(messageByte, 0, 2);

            int bytesToRead = byteBuffer.getShort();
            System.out.println("About to read " + bytesToRead + " octets");

            //The following code shows in detail how to read from a TCP socket

            while(!end)
            {
                bytesRead = in.read(messageByte);
                dataString += new String(messageByte, 0, bytesRead);
                if (dataString.length() == bytesToRead )
                {
                    end = true;
                }
            }

            //All the code in the loop can be replaced by these two lines
            //in.readFully(messageByte, 0, bytesToRead);
            //dataString = new String(messageByte, 0, bytesToRead);

            System.out.println("MESSAGE: " + dataString);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
19
  • 1
    Thanks rodok. I had a similar problem in writing a HTTP server. I managed to solve the problem using 'Content-Length' header as a mechanism to wait for exact amount of data from client.
    – Sali Hoo
    Jan 15 '16 at 18:32
  • @SaliHoo, yes that's the way to do it: with HTTP you need to read until you find 'Content-Length' (then you read the rest with the number you obtained) but there are other two cases to consider: when 'Content-Length' is not present and you find two '\r\n' (content is 0) and when the message contains chunks.
    – rodolk
    Jan 15 '16 at 18:35
  • 1
    @GeorgedeLemos Most probably the problem is that the client is processing the message with the same thread it's reading (I suppose so). Whatever it is the client is taking too much time for additional processing. TCP has a mechanism for flow control, if the client is consuming data at a slower pace it arrives from server, at some point the TCP receive buffer will be filled and TCP will tell the server to stop sending with an advertised window wtih value 0 (zero). That should manage the situation. However your concern must be related to how slow the client is. Use a different thread to process.
    – rodolk
    Jun 16 '18 at 0:11
  • 1
    @stdout ordering is handled by TCP. It delivers data in order to the application layer. You don't need to worry about it in the application layer. There are other complicated scenarios with asynchronous communication but I suppose you're not referring to it.
    – rodolk
    Mar 27 '20 at 19:34
  • 1
    @stdout, it's difficult to understand your comment. A TCP connection can be for HTTP or for any other application layer protocol. In HTTP the goal of the server is to read a complete HTTP request. For that, you have to apply what is explained in my response. You need to read everything until you find the HTTP message length in the HTTP header, in whatever position it is. Then you know the total amount of Bytes you need to read for the complete request.
    – rodolk
    Mar 30 '20 at 16:26
1
int c;
    String raw = "";
    do {
        c = inputstream.read();
        raw+=(char)c;
    } while(inputstream.available()>0);

InputStream.available() shows the available bytes only after one byte is read, hence do .. while

1
  • In network communication, knowledge of length cannot be interrogated by .available() but instead, only by a header
    – eigenfield
    Oct 19 '20 at 10:20
0

You can read your BufferedInputStream like this. It will read data till it reaches end of stream which is indicated by -1.

inputS = new BufferedInputStream(inBS);
byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];    //If you handle larger data use a bigger buffer size
int read;
while((read = inputS.read(buffer)) != -1) {
    System.out.println(read);
    // Your code to handle the data
}
3
  • 1
    I was just showing how to read the entire input stream. println() is just a place holder here. The OP has not asked how to get the read count! If he understands how to read the entire stream, he will understand how to get the read count.
    – Code.me
    Nov 8 '13 at 4:29
  • OP is using InputStream. The while loop will hang forever unless he sets a timeout, like: socket.setSoTimeout(1000);
    – SoloPilot
    Sep 25 '14 at 21:19
  • It's this code that needs to use the read count. Your 'handle the data' handwaving doesn't even mention it.
    – user207421
    Feb 11 '15 at 21:58

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