9

When I tried to sort a collection a string field (here Title), sorting not working as expected. Please see below:

db.SomeCollection.find().limit(50).sort({ "Title" : -1 });

Actual Result order

  • "Title" : "geog.3 students' book"
  • "Title" : "geog.2 students' book"
  • "Title" : "geog.1 students' book"
  • "Title" : "Zoe and Swift"
  • "Title" : "Zip at the Theme Park"
  • "Title" : "Zip at the Supermarket"

Expected Result order

  • "Title" : "Zoe and Swift"
  • "Title" : "Zip at the Theme Park"
  • "Title" : "Zip at the Supermarket"
  • "Title" : "geog.3 students' book"
  • "Title" : "geog.2 students' book"
  • "Title" : "geog.1 students' book"

Same issues occurs when I tried to sort by Date field.

Any suggestions?

1
  • If the date isn't sorting correctly, I would suspect it is because your representation of the date isn't sortable. Commented Nov 8, 2013 at 11:55

5 Answers 5

6

Update: Version 3.4 has case insensitive indexes

This is a known issue. MongoDB doesn't support lexical sorting for strings (JIRA: String lexicographical ordering). You should sort the results in your application code, or sort using a numeric field. It should sort date fields reliably though. Can you give an example where sorting by date doesn't work?

1
  • 5
    This would not be feasible if you have 1 million records and you want to sort them and return the first 10.
    – cdmckay
    Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 22:22
3

What exactly surprises you?

It sorts based on the presentation of the numerical representation of the symbol. If you will look here (I know that mongodb stores string in UTF-8, so this is just for educational purpose). You will see that the upper case letters have corresponding numbers lower then lower case letters. Thus they will go in front.

Mongodb can not sort letters based on localization or case insensitive.

In your case g has higher number then Z, so it goes first (sorting in decreasing order). And then 3 has corresponding number higher then 2 and 1. So basically everything is correct.

3

If you use aggregation expected output is possible see below:


    db.collection.aggregate([
    { 
        "$project": {
           "Title": 1,        
           "output": { "$toLower": "$Title" }       
        }},
        { "$sort": {  "output":-1 } },
        {"$project": {"Title": 1, "_id":0}}
    ])


it will give you expected output as below:


    {
        "result" : [ 
            {
                "Title" : "Zoe and Swift"
            }, 
            {
                "Title" : "Zip at the Theme Park"
            }, 
            {
                "Title" : "Zip at the Supermarket"
            }, 
            {
                "Title" : "geog.3 students' book"
            }, 
            {
                "Title" : "geog.2 students' book"
            }, 
            {
                "Title" : "geog.1 students' book"
            }
        ],
        "ok" : 1
    }

0
2

Starting with the dates not sorting correctly....

If you're storing a date as a string, it needs to be sortable as a string. It's quite simple:

2013-11-08  // yyyy-mm-dd (the dashes would be optional)

As long as every piece of the date string is padded with 0 correctly, the strings will all sort naturally and in the way you would expect.

A full date time is stored in UTC typically:

2013-11-23T10:46:01.914Z

But, I'd also suggest you instead of storing a date value as a string, you consider whether using a native MongoDB Date would make more sense (reference). If you look at MongoDb's aggregation framework, you'll find there are many functions that can manipulate these dates, while a string is very limited.

As to the string sorting, it's been pointed out that it's sorting like a computer stores the data rather than the way you would sort as a person. If you consider the string is stored as its ASCII/UTF-8 representation, you should see why the sorting is working the way it is:

Zoe = [90, 111, 101]
geo = [103, 101, 111]

If you were to sort those in descending order as you've specified, you should see how "geo"'s internal byte representation is larger than that of the string "Zoe" (with 103 sorting higher than 90 in this case).

Typically, the recommendation when using MongoDb is to store the strings twice if you need to sort a string that has mixed case:

  1. Original string ("Title")
  2. As a normalized string. Possibly for example all as "lowercase"' possibly with accented characters also converted to a common character. So, you'd end up with a new field named "SortedTitle" for example and your code would use that to sort, but display the actual "Title" to users.
0

If you are doing in ror and mongomapper then follow below steps :

I have taken my model name abc and fetch result for Title.

@test_abc_details_array_full=Abc.collection.aggregate([

     {"$project"=> {
       "Title"=> 1,        
       "output"=> { "$toLower"=> "$Title" }       
    }},
    { "$sort"=> {  "output"=>1 } },        
    {"$project"=> {Title: 1, _id:0}},

  ]); 

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