6

Background

One of the most used data-structures in our application is a custom Point struct. Recently we have been running into memory issues, mostly caused by an excessive number of instances of this struct.

Many of these instances contain the same data. Sharing a single instance would significantly help to reduce memory usage. However, since we are using structs, instances cannot be shared. It is also not possible to change it to a class, because the struct semantics are important.

Our workaround for this is to have a struct containing a single reference to a backing class, which contains the actual data. These flyweight dataclasses are stored in and retrieved from a factory to ensure no duplicates exist.

A narrowed down version of the code looks something like this:

public struct PointD
{
    //Factory
    private static class PointDatabase
    {
        private static readonly Dictionary<PointData, PointData> _data = new Dictionary<PointData, PointData>();

        public static PointData Get(double x, double y)
        {
            var key = new PointData(x, y);
            if (!_data.ContainsKey(key))
                _data.Add(key, key);

            return _data[key];
        }
    }

    //Flyweight data
    private class PointData
    {
        private double pX;
        private double pY;

        public PointData(double x, double y)
        {
            pX = x;
            pY = y;
        }

        public double X
        {
            get { return pX; }
        }

        public double Y
        {
            get { return pY; }
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            var other = obj as PointData;
            if (other == null)
                return false;
            return other.X == this.X && other.Y == this.Y;
        }
        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return X.GetHashCode() * Y.GetHashCode();
        }
    }


    //Public struct

    public Point(double x, double y)
    {
        _data = Point3DDatabase.Get(x, y);
    }

    public double X
    {
        get { return _data == null ? 0 : _data.X; }
        set { _data = PointDatabase.Get(value, Y); }
    }

    public double Y
    {
        get { return _data == null ? 0 : _data.Y; }
        set { _data = PointDatabase.Get(X, value); }
    }
}

This implementation ensures that the struct semantics are maintained, while ensuring only one instance of the same data is kept around.

(Please don't mention memory leaks or such, this is simplified example code)

The Problem

Although above approach works to lower our memory usage, the performance is horrendous. A project in our application can easily contain a million different points or more. As a result, the lookup of a PointData instance is very costly. And this lookup has to be done whenever a Point is manipulated, which, as you can probably guess, is what our application is all about. As a result, this approach is not suitable for us.

As an alternative, we could make two versions of the Point class: one with backing flyweight as above, and one containing its own data (with possible duplicates). All (short-lived) calculations could be done in the second class, while when storing the Point for longer durations they could be converted to the first, memory-efficient class. However, this means that all the users of the Point class have to be inspected and adjusted to this scheme, something which is not feasible for us.

What we are looking for is an approach which meets below criteria:

  • When there are multiple Points with the same data, the memory usage should be lower than having a different struct instance for each of these.
  • Performance should not be much worse than working directly on primitive data in the struct.
  • Struct semantics should be maintained.
  • The 'Point' interface should remain the same (i.e. classes that use 'Point' should not have to be changed).

Is there any way we can improve our approach towards these criteria? Or can anyone suggest a different approach we can attempt?

11
  • 4
    Not related to your question but: That's an awful hash code method. The hash code for an integer is the value of the integer itself. So if either X or Y is zero, the hash code will be zero. I imagine that this could cause a lot of collisions in hashing containers - such as that Dictionary you're using!. You should use something like return X + 31 * Y; Nov 8, 2013 at 9:28
  • @MatthewWatson I usually XOR the HashCodes of fields. Would that be more appropriate?
    – Gusdor
    Nov 8, 2013 at 9:31
  • @Gusdor XOR isn't very good because it will be zero for ALL cases where X == Y. If you have a dataset such that there are many cases where X == Y you will get lots of collisions. Nov 8, 2013 at 9:34
  • @MatthewWatson fair point, I do bad things like that more than I'd like to admit. But as you indicated, this is just a minor factor in the overall performance.
    – Steven
    Nov 8, 2013 at 9:39
  • 2
    @Steven Well it might NOT be a minor factor. If you were to store a million points with X==0 and Y==0 into that dictionary, it would degenerate into a linearly-searched linked-list with a million nodes instead of a hashing container! Nov 8, 2013 at 9:41

1 Answer 1

0

Rather than re-work an entire data structure and programming model, my go-to solution for performance and memory issues is to cache, pre-fetch and most importantly cull you data when it is not needed.

Think of it this way. On a graph, you cannot display few millions of points at once because you run out of pixels (you should occlusion-cull these points). Similarly, in a table, there isn't enough vertical space on screen (you need data set truncation). Consider streaming data from your source file as you need it. If your source data structure is not appropriate for dynamic retrieval, consider an intermediate, temporary file format. This is one of the ways .Net's JITer works so quickly!

3
  • If i understand correctly, what you say boils down to "store data on file rather than in-memory". It's hard for me to judge this right away, but I have the feeling we actually need (mots) of this data available roughly simultaneously. We don't (only) display the data on screen, but also do a lot of aggregating computations.
    – Steven
    Nov 8, 2013 at 9:35
  • @Steven even with an aggregation, you will only need a handful of values in memory at a time right? When you get into large data sets, there is always a performance vs memory footprint tradeoff.
    – Gusdor
    Nov 8, 2013 at 9:52
  • 1
    As for your understanding; yes, that is what I'm saying. Store your data on disk when you can, in a format (probably binary and indexed) which lets you stream it into memory quickly. You probably want a temporary in-memory cache that you can flush when you are done with an operation. Perhaps an embedded database like SQLLite would provide a quick-to-build solution but it may still be too slow at runtime. If you go the relational route, index as many fields as you can. Insertion performance is not as important as retrieval for your needs.
    – Gusdor
    Nov 8, 2013 at 9:55

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