21

I want to know how to implement composition and aggregation in UML terms in python.

If I understood:

  1. Aggregation:

class B:
    pass

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.B = B

  1. Composition:

In other languages I saw this implemented as a pointer to B. I guess here self.B is a pointer in python.

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, B):
        self.B = B

Is it right?

5
  • I'm unsure what you mean by aggregation. Are you trying to have A as a subclass of B in the first example?
    – Hannele
    Nov 8, 2013 at 15:09
  • 1
    @Hannele: I'm not talking about inheritance here. I use the UML terms.
    – Katsu
    Nov 8, 2013 at 15:13
  • @Katsu - Hannele is correct, you can't have aggregation without inheritance Nov 8, 2013 at 15:24
  • @EkoostikMartin: In other languages you can. So in python I have to inherit? Is it what you mean?
    – Katsu
    Nov 8, 2013 at 15:44
  • I think I begin to understand what you're after. Does my answer help? I've edited it pretty heavily since the initial post.
    – Hannele
    Nov 8, 2013 at 16:32

3 Answers 3

44

Composition and aggregation are specialised form of Association. Whereas Association is a relationship between two classes without any rules.

Composition

In composition, one of the classes is composed of one or more instance of other classes. In other words, one class is container and other class is content and if you delete the container object then all of its contents objects are also deleted.

Now let's see an example of composition in Python 3.5. Class Employee is container and class Salary is content.

class Salary:
    def __init__(self,pay):
        self.pay=pay

    def get_total(self):
       return (self.pay*12)

class Employee:
    def __init__(self,pay,bonus):
        self.pay=pay
        self.bonus=bonus
        self.obj_salary=Salary(self.pay)

    def annual_salary(self):
        return "Total: "  +  str(self.obj_salary.get_total()+self.bonus)


obj_emp=Employee(100,10)
print (obj_emp.annual_salary())

Aggregation

Aggregation is a weak form of composition. If you delete the container object contents objects can live without container object.

Now let's see an example of aggregation in Python 3.5. Again Class Employee is container and class Salary is content.

class Salary:
    def __init__(self,pay):
        self.pay=pay

    def get_total(self):
       return (self.pay*12)

class Employee:
    def __init__(self,pay,bonus):
        self.pay=pay
        self.bonus=bonus

    def annual_salary(self):
        return "Total: "  +  str(self.pay.get_total()+self.bonus)


obj_sal=Salary(100)
obj_emp=Employee(obj_sal,10)
print (obj_emp.annual_salary())
1
  • So the difference in implementation between Composition and Aggregation is where the "instance of the contained class" (what is the formal term for this instance?) is created. If Employee stored a list of Salary objects (that were created outside of Employee), then Employee and Salary would still be an aggregation relationship right?
    – Minh Tran
    Feb 27, 2018 at 21:22
38

If I understand correctly, aggregation vs composition is about the responsibilities of an object to its members (e.g. if you delete an instance, do you also delete its members?).

Mainly, it will depend a lot on the implementation. For example, to create a class A which receives an instance of class B (aggregation), you could write the following:

class B(object): pass

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, b):
        self.b = b

b = B()
a = A(b)

But as a point of caution, there is nothing built-in to Python that will prevent you from passing in something else, for example:

a = A("string") # still valid

If you would like to create the instance of B inside the constructor of A (composition), you could write the following:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.b = B()

Or, you could inject the class into the constructor, and then create an instance, like so:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, B):
        self.b = B()

As an aside, in at least your first example and possibly the second, you are setting B to the class definition of B, not to an instance of it:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, B):
        self.B = B

>>> a = A()
>>> a.B # class definition
<class __main__.B at 0x028586C0>
>>> a.B() # which you can make instances of
<__main__.B instance at 0x02860990>

So, you end up with an instance of A pointing to the class definition of B, which I'm fairly sure is not what you're after. Although, that is generally much harder to do in other languages, so I understand if that was one of the points of confusion.

5
  • +1. Thank's for your great answer. In fact, I'm confused because I try to implement a sub-package in a (big) package which is not documented and I try: 1. to convert python package into UML and 2. to translate UML concept into python. In fact there are some class in that package which are setting to the class definition of other class but I can't directly show it.
    – Katsu
    Nov 9, 2013 at 11:34
  • In fact the main issue is that I want to translate from my UML graph to a python code. I defined some link between class like inheritance, aggregation and composition which relate well the project conception. So when I create an aggregation I want to keep this concept in python. I'm aware about difference between definition of class and instance of class which is actually an other thread. Here what I want to know is the way of implementing this concept as you called responsibility.
    – Katsu
    Nov 9, 2013 at 11:47
  • I am utterly confused with the composition example. Why would you instate a concrete class (in this case B) inside another class (A)? That way an unnecessary dependency is introduced, instead of just injecting B into A. Yes, than you can inject anything into A, such as string in your example, but weren't you do some validation to check whether the injected object has implemented a particular behaviour that A expects?
    – chao
    Dec 11, 2016 at 16:38
  • @chao First let me say, I wasn't trying to say one approach is better than the other - of course you could make sure that the class you've injected follows the behaviour you expect. Using the constructor, I was trying to demonstrate a difference in the responsibility of the class to its components - the class being responsible for component creation & destruction, vs an external party passing it in and being responsible. I've added one more example - injecting the class and creating an instance.
    – Hannele
    Jan 16, 2017 at 2:34
  • @Hannele I see, now it's clear. Thanks for your further explanation.
    – chao
    Jan 25, 2017 at 21:51
4
# Aggregation is NOT exclusive
class BaseChapter:
    '''
    We can use this BaseChapter in any book, like in OpenBook.
    '''

    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
        self.subject = None
        self.content = None
        return

class OpenBook:

    def __init__(self, isbn):
        self.isbn = isbn
        self.chapters = list()

    def add_chapter(self, obj):

        # This constrain dont have correlation with composition/aggregation
        if isinstance(obj, BaseChapter):
            self.chapters.append(obj)
        else:
            raise TypeError('ChapterError')

# .. but Composition is Exclusive
# Example:
class MyBook:

    class MyChapter:
        '''
        This MyChapter can be used only by MyBook
        '''
        def __init__(self, name, subject):
            self.name = name
            self.subject = subject
            self.title = None
            self.content = None
            self.techincal_refs = list()
            return

    def __init__(self, isbn):
        self.isbn = isbn
        self.chapters = list()

    def add_chapter(self, obj):
        # This constrain dont have correlation with composition/aggregation
        # what is important here is MyChapter can be used only by MyBook
        # a outside object cant create a instance of MyChapter
        if isinstance(obj, self.MyChapter):
            self.chapters.append(obj)
        else:
            raise TypeError('ChapterError')

.. and yes we can do better like

class MyBook:

    class MyChapter(BaseChapter):
        '''
        This MyChapter can be used only by MyBook,
        but now is based in BaseChapter.
        But you knhow, python dont create problems if you still want
        create a instance of MyChapter in other 'Books'.

        But when you see this code you will think, This class is exclusive
        to MyBook.
        '''
        def __init__(self, name):
            super().__init__(name)
            self.subject = None
            self.title = None
            self.content = None
            self.techincal_refs = list()
            return

    def __init__(self, nib):
        self.nib = nib
        self.chapters = list()

    def add_chapter(self, obj):
        # This constrain dont have correlation with composition/agregation
        # what is important here is MyChapter can be used only by MyBook
        if isinstance(obj, self.MyChapter):
            self.chapters.append(obj)
        else:
            raise TypeError('ChapterError')

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