13

Let's say I have the following HTML files:

html1.html

<html>
  <head>
    <link href="blah.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
  </head>
  <body>
    <div>this here be a div, y'all</div>
  </body>
</html>

html2.html

<html>
  <head>
    <script src="blah.js"></script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <span>this here be a span, y'all</span>
  </body>
</html>

I want to take these two files and make a master file that would look like this:

<html>
  <head>
    <link href="blah.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <script src="blah.js"></script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div>this here be a div, y'all</div>
    <span>this here be a span, y'all</span>
  </body>
</html>

Is this possible using a simple Linux command? I've tried looking at join, but it looks like that joins on a common field, and I'm not necessarily going to have common fields... I just need to basically add the difference, but also have the main structure still intact (I guess this could be referred to as a left-join?). Doesn't look like cat will work either... as that merges by appending one file, then the next, etc.

If there isn't a simple Linux command, my next step is to either write a script that compares both scripts line by line, or create a master HTML file that references these two individual files somehow.

  • 1
    FYI, If you just concatenate the two files together, as is, they will display one after the other in most browsers. Or, you can create a 'master' HTML file, that will load each of these files in frames. – mti2935 Nov 8 '13 at 19:25
  • Yep, but that's not an option for what I need done. – incutonez Nov 8 '13 at 19:27
4

Your example files are well-formed XHTML. Excellent! This means you can use a simple XSLT script. See How to merge two XML files with XSLT

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  • 1
    What is this trickery? I've never heard of XSLT before... interesting. I shall look into this, and if I can create a working script, I'll accept this answer (unless someone comes along with a nice Linux command). Thanks. – incutonez Nov 8 '13 at 19:34
  • This will only work if all your real HTML files are also well-formed XML (i.e. they follow the syntax rules of XML). – Robin Green Nov 8 '13 at 19:36
  • My HTML files (that I'm trying to merge) get generated by another application, but they appear to be well-formed. – incutonez Nov 8 '13 at 19:55
  • 2
    Sometimes it's possible to "fix" messy HTML with xmllint – el.pescado Nov 8 '13 at 21:09
  • 2
    Please can you tell me how you did this using XSLT. Can you share the script link or method that you used to solve this problem. – Alankar More Aug 3 '15 at 9:21
5

You can use html-merge tool to merge multiple HTML files preserving their internal hypertext links. It's a win32 program, but you can run it in linux using Wine. Download page: https://sourceforge.net/projects/htmlmg/files/

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  • I had to change all the source file encodings to UTF-8, but after that it worked a charm! Thanks! – Keyslinger Feb 15 '15 at 5:19
  • doesn't work when the encoding is Chinese "GB2312" :( There is no source code either, so I couldn't correct it. – Shaohua Li Feb 28 '15 at 6:12
  • The supported encodings are listed in the README file for the program. They currently include ISO-8859-1/2/3, Windows-1250/1/2/3, UTF-16, UTF-16BE, UTF-8. Some html files do not have encoding specified, and contain characters that do not allow them to be treated as UTF-8 by default. – bkxp Mar 12 '15 at 12:57
  • Adding support for Asian character sets is not trivial, because the program uses custom HTML parser, and the input files may have different encodings. This means that the fix would require adding your own transcoding routines and tables for GB2312. Also, html-merge always outputs UTF-8, partly because of the same need to choose one universal encoding for differently encoded input. UTF-16 would produce larger files for European languages. – bkxp Mar 12 '15 at 13:01
5

Use pandoc to merge e.g. all html-files in the current directory:

pandoc -s *.html -o output.html
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  • The html links in a document generated in this way do not work. – Att Righ Jul 28 '18 at 20:06
0

Here is a simple solution that uses Python's lxml library, though it will only copy element children of the body tag selected child::*, not text nodes, which would require a modification child::node() and some extra logic for dealing with appending text nodes.

#!/usr/bin/python3
import sys, os
from lxml.html import tostring, parse

if len(sys.argv) < 2:
  print("Usage: merge.py [file1] ... [filen] [outfile]")

if os.path.isfile(sys.argv[-1]):
   if input('Override? (y/n) ' + sys.argv[-1]) != 'y':
      sys.exit(0)

def tostr(n):
  try:
    return tostring(n)
  except:
    return str(n)

tree = parse(sys.argv[1])
for f in sys.argv[2:-1]:
  print(f)
  tree2 = parse(f)
  for n in tree2.xpath('//head/child::*'):
     if all([tostr(n) != tostr(n2)\
        for n2 in tree2.xpath('//head/child::*')]):
       tree.xpath('//head')[0].append(n)
  for n in tree2.xpath('//body/child::*'):
     tree.xpath('//body')[0].append(n)

tree.write(sys.argv[-1])

Save this to a file merge.py and run chmod +x merge.py.

Usage: merge.py [file1] ... [filen] [outfile]

If it fails, one or more files are malformed and need to be fixed either manually or with htmllint or hxnormalize.

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