26

Is there a way for me to configure PyCharm to run shell_plus instead of the default shell?

I've tried putting the text of the manage command in the 'Starting script' but then I get the folloiwing django_manage_shell.run("/Users/cmason/counsyl/code/website/counsyl/product") import os import sys

if __name__ == "__main__":
    os.environ.setdefault("DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE", "settings")

    # The new Django 1.4 default manage.py wants "from django..." before
    # importing settings, but we usually tinker with sys.path in
    # settings_local.py, which is called from settings.py. Importing
    # settings.py works but does mean some double importing. Luckily that
    # module does very little work.
    import settings
    # appease pyflakes; don't ever do this in
    # non-super-meta-namespace-trickery code
    settings

    from django.core.management import execute_from_command_line

    execute_from_command_line("shellplus")

and it hasn't really run shell_plus.

It seems like the 'Starting script' happens in addition to rather than instead of the default.

Shell_plus automatically imports all Django model classes, among other things.

2
  • 1
    I was able to get it to work just by using shell_plus as the custom run command.
    – jproffitt
    Commented Nov 9, 2013 at 16:25
  • 2
    That works, but it doesn't have the PyCharm command line completion goodness, and you can't use command line editing (up and down arrow for instance). Commented Nov 10, 2013 at 18:02

8 Answers 8

26

I got the model objects auto-loading by hooking into the shell_plus code. I appended this to the default startup script in Preferences > Build, Execution, Deployment > Console > Django Console:

from django_extensions.management import shells
from django.core.management.color import color_style
imported_items = shells.import_objects({}, color_style())
for k, v in imported_items.items():
    globals()[k] = v

This was on PyCharm 2018.3.3 Pro

For completeness, this was the full content of starting script:

import sys; print('Python %s on %s' % (sys.version, sys.platform))
import django; print('Django %s' % django.get_version())
sys.path.extend([WORKING_DIR_AND_PYTHON_PATHS])
if 'setup' in dir(django): django.setup()
import django_manage_shell; django_manage_shell.run(PROJECT_ROOT)

from django_extensions.management import shells
from django.core.management.color import color_style
imported_items = shells.import_objects({}, color_style())
for k, v in imported_items.items():
    globals()[k] = v
1
  • I had to add DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE with its value in the environment variables. Post that, this script worked perfectly! Commented Jan 14, 2020 at 11:59
17

I've been looking for a solution to the same problem, and I ended up here. I tried solutions proposed by others, but none of those appeared to solve this issue. So I decided to find another solution. This is what I came up with:

The code block below is the original Django Console starting script of PyCharm 2019.2:

import sys, django
print('Python %s on %s' % (sys.version, sys.platform))
print('Django %s' % django.get_version())
sys.path.extend([WORKING_DIR_AND_PYTHON_PATHS])
if 'setup' in dir(django):
    django.setup()
import django_manage_shell
django_manage_shell.run(PROJECT_ROOT)

Installing IPython and changing the last two lines as below gets it done in the most proper way:

from IPython.core.getipython import get_ipython
ipython = get_ipython()
from django_extensions.management.notebook_extension import load_ipython_extension
load_ipython_extension(ipython)

To make it work: open PyCharm settings (CTRL+S) and head to Django Console section. Then make changes in Starting script window and apply. Finally, start the new Python Console instance.

2
  • 1
    Thank you. It works like a charm! (I also need to install ipython in my venv) Commented Nov 29, 2019 at 5:03
  • I worked on Django 1.8, Python 3.7 and django-extensions 1.7.4
    – RobertPro
    Commented Mar 29, 2021 at 16:38
12

I looked at the source code of shell_plus, and noticed you could use a method on a Command class named get_imported_objects({})

In PyCharm, go to: Build, Execution, Deployment > Console > Django Console > Starting script

Add this to the existing code in that box:

from django_extensions.management.commands.shell_plus import Command
globals().update(Command().get_imported_objects({}))

Note: you may have to restart PyCharm to see the effect.

1
  • 4
    This worked on Django 3.1, django-extensions 2.2.3, Python 3.8
    – RobertPro
    Commented Mar 29, 2021 at 16:37
4

One way to solve this is to create a new Python run configuration. Set the target to module, and select the manage.py file for the project. Then put shell_plus in the Parameters field. Set the Working Directory to the project directory. Then lastly, set the Execution to Run with Python Console. Apply the changes, then run the new configuration.

Screenshot of PyCharm Run/Debug Configurations

2

This isn't a complete answer, but I found this script that at least loads up all the app models. Put this in Settings > Console > Django Console > Starting script:

import sys
import logging
logging.basicConfig(format="%(levelname)-8s %(asctime)s %(name)s %(message)s", datefmt='%m/%d/%y %H:%M:%S', stream=sys.stdout )
log = logging.getLogger("root")

from django.db.models import get_models
from django.conf import settings
from django.core.exceptions import ObjectDoesNotExist, MultipleObjectsReturned

logging.config.dictConfig(settings.LOGGING)
log.debug("Logging has been initialized at DEBUG")
log.setLevel( logging.DEBUG)
log.disabled = False

for _class in get_models():
    if _class.__name__.startswith("Historical"): continue
    log.debug("Registering model {}".format(_class.__name__))
    globals()[_class.__name__] = _class

def debug_sql():
    from debug_toolbar.management.commands import debugsqlshell
    return

I also submitted this a feature request to JetBrains.

1
1

In Django 1.7, following script can be used as a workaround with PyCharm 3.4:

File -> Settings -> Console -> Django Console and manage.py options

In Starting script, put:

import sys
import django
django.setup()

from django.db.models import get_models

for _class in get_models():
    globals()[_class.__name__] = _class
1

django shell run config

This configuration works for me

0

As django.db.models.get_models no longer exists, here's an updated version that will accomplish the same as Christopher Mason's version.

import sys; print('Python %s on %s' % (sys.version, sys.platform))
import django; print('Django %s' % django.get_version())
import logging
logging.basicConfig(format="%(levelname)-8s %(asctime)s %(name)s %(message)s", datefmt='%m/%d/%y %H:%M:%S', stream=sys.stdout )
log = logging.getLogger("root")

from django.apps import apps
from django.conf import settings  
from django.core.exceptions import ObjectDoesNotExist, MultipleObjectsReturned

logging.config.dictConfig(settings.LOGGING)
log.debug("Logging has been initialized at DEBUG")
log.setLevel( logging.DEBUG)
log.disabled = False

for _configs in apps.get_app_configs():
    for _class in _configs.get_models():
        if _class.__name__.startswith("Historical"): continue
        log.debug("Registering model {}".format(_class.__name__))
        globals()[_class.__name__] = apps.get_model(_configs.label, _class.__name__)

def debug_sql():
    from debug_toolbar.management.commands import debugsqlshell
    return
0

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