433

When I print a numpy array, I get a truncated representation, but I want the full array.

Is there any way to do this?

Examples:

>>> numpy.arange(10000)
array([   0,    1,    2, ..., 9997, 9998, 9999])

>>> numpy.arange(10000).reshape(250,40)
array([[   0,    1,    2, ...,   37,   38,   39],
       [  40,   41,   42, ...,   77,   78,   79],
       [  80,   81,   82, ...,  117,  118,  119],
       ..., 
       [9880, 9881, 9882, ..., 9917, 9918, 9919],
       [9920, 9921, 9922, ..., 9957, 9958, 9959],
       [9960, 9961, 9962, ..., 9997, 9998, 9999]])
  • 11
    Is there a way to do it on a "one off" basis? That is, to print out the full output once, but not at other times in the script? – Matt O'Brien May 18 '14 at 3:07
  • 3
    @Matt O'Brien see ZSG's answer below – user2398029 Aug 8 '14 at 21:04
  • 6
    Could you change the accepted answer to the one recommending np.inf? np.nan and 'nan' only work by total fluke, and 'nan' doesn't even work in Python 3 because they changed the mixed-type comparison implementation that threshold='nan' depended on. – user2357112 Jun 1 '17 at 20:03
  • 1
    (threshold=np.nan rather than 'nan' depends on a different fluke, which is that the array printing logic compares the array size to the threshold with a.size > _summaryThreshold. This always returns False for _summaryThreshold=np.nan. If the comparison had been a.size <= _summaryThreshold, testing whether the array should be fully printed instead of testing whether it should be summarized, this threshold would trigger summarization for all arrays.) – user2357112 Jun 1 '17 at 20:14
  • 1
    A "one-off" way of doing it: If you have a numpy.array tmp just list(tmp). Other options with different formatting are tmp.tolist() or for more control print("\n".join(str(x) for x in tmp)). – travc Dec 30 '17 at 2:17

16 Answers 16

463

Use numpy.set_printoptions:

import sys
import numpy
numpy.set_printoptions(threshold=sys.maxsize)
183
import numpy as np
np.set_printoptions(threshold=np.inf)

I suggest using np.inf instead of np.nan which is suggested by others. They both work for your purpose, but by setting the threshold to "infinity" it is obvious to everybody reading your code what you mean. Having a threshold of "not a number" seems a little vague to me.

  • 5
    What's the inverse operation of this? How to go back to the previous setting (with the dots)? – Karlo Mar 3 '17 at 10:55
  • 6
    @Karlo The default number is 1000, so np.set_printoptions(threshold=1000) will revert it to default behaviour. But you can set this threshold as low or high as you like. np.set_printoptions(threshold=np.inf) simply changes the maximum size a printed array can be before it is truncated to infinite, so that it is never truncated no matter how big. If you set the threshold to any real number then that will be the maximum size. – PaulMag Mar 4 '17 at 3:36
  • 6
    Not only is this clearer, it's much less fragile. There is no special handling for np.inf, np.nan, or 'nan'. Whatever you put there, NumPy will still use a plain > to compare the size of the array to your threshold. np.nan only happens to work because it's a.size > _summaryThreshold instead of a.size <= _summaryThreshold, and np.nan returns False for all >/</>=/<= comparisons. 'nan' only happens to work due to fragile implementation details of Python 2's mixed-type comparison logic; it breaks completely on Python 3. – user2357112 Jun 1 '17 at 20:12
  • 2
    Use sys.maxsize since the value is documented to be an int – mattip Nov 8 '18 at 19:09
59

The previous answers are the correct ones, but as a weaker alternative you can transform into a list:

>>> numpy.arange(100).reshape(25,4).tolist()

[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10, 11], [12, 13, 14, 15], [16, 17, 18, 19], [20, 21,
22, 23], [24, 25, 26, 27], [28, 29, 30, 31], [32, 33, 34, 35], [36, 37, 38, 39], [40, 41,
42, 43], [44, 45, 46, 47], [48, 49, 50, 51], [52, 53, 54, 55], [56, 57, 58, 59], [60, 61,
62, 63], [64, 65, 66, 67], [68, 69, 70, 71], [72, 73, 74, 75], [76, 77, 78, 79], [80, 81,
82, 83], [84, 85, 86, 87], [88, 89, 90, 91], [92, 93, 94, 95], [96, 97, 98, 99]]
  • 7
    This seems to be the best one-off way to see your full array in a print statement. – Aaron Bramson Aug 1 '18 at 2:27
40

This sounds like you're using numpy.

If that's the case, you can add:

import numpy as np
np.set_printoptions(threshold=np.nan)

That will disable the corner printing. For more information, see this NumPy Tutorial.

  • 1
    ValueError: threshold must be numeric and non-NAN, try sys.maxsize for untruncated representation – Eric Mar 7 at 6:49
30

Here is a one-off way to do this, which is useful if you don't want to change your default settings:

def fullprint(*args, **kwargs):
  from pprint import pprint
  import numpy
  opt = numpy.get_printoptions()
  numpy.set_printoptions(threshold='nan')
  pprint(*args, **kwargs)
  numpy.set_printoptions(**opt)
  • 12
    Looks like this would be a good place to use a context manager, so you can say "with fullprint". – Paul Price Sep 17 '14 at 15:38
  • 5
    Do not use 'nan', np.nan, or any of the above. It's unsupported, and this bad advice is causing pain for people transitioning to python 3 – Eric Nov 9 '18 at 3:54
  • 1
    @ZSG Replace line 5 with numpy.set_printoptions(threshold=numpy.inf) – Nirmal Nov 20 '18 at 11:26
25

Using a context manager as Paul Price sugggested

import numpy as np


class fullprint:
    'context manager for printing full numpy arrays'

    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        kwargs.setdefault('threshold', np.inf)
        self.opt = kwargs

    def __enter__(self):
        self._opt = np.get_printoptions()
        np.set_printoptions(**self.opt)

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        np.set_printoptions(**self._opt)

a = np.arange(1001)

with fullprint():
    print(a)

print(a)

with fullprint(threshold=None, edgeitems=10):
    print(a)
  • 3
    That's a smart use of a context manager. – timgeb Oct 6 '16 at 20:17
  • 5
    This context manager is built into numpy 1.15, thanks to github.com/numpy/numpy/pull/10406, under the name np.printoptions – Eric Apr 2 '18 at 23:48
17

NumPy 1.15 or newer

If you use NumPy 1.15 (released 2018-07-23) or newer, you can use the printoptions context manager:

with numpy.printoptions(threshold=numpy.inf):
    print(arr)

(of course, replace numpy by np if that's how you imported numpy)

The use of a context manager (the with-block) ensures that after the context manager is finished, the print options will revert to whatever they were before the block started. It ensures the setting is temporary, and only applied to code within the block.

See numpy.printoptions documentation for details on the context manager and what other arguments it supports.

  • 2
    This is currently the cleanest answer, the others are sort of outdated. – protagonist Apr 26 at 0:59
10

numpy.savetxt

numpy.savetxt(sys.stdout, numpy.arange(10000))

or if you need a string:

import StringIO
sio = StringIO.StringIO()
numpy.savetxt(sio, numpy.arange(10000))
s = sio.getvalue()
print s

The default output format is:

0.000000000000000000e+00
1.000000000000000000e+00
2.000000000000000000e+00
3.000000000000000000e+00
...

and it can be configured with further arguments.

Note in particular how this also not shows the square brackets, and allows for a lot of customization, as mentioned at: How to print a Numpy array without brackets?

Tested on Python 2.7.12, numpy 1.11.1.

9

This is a slight modification (removed the option to pass additional arguments to set_printoptions)of neoks answer.

It shows how you can use contextlib.contextmanager to easily create such a contextmanager with fewer lines of code:

import numpy as np
from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def show_complete_array():
    oldoptions = np.get_printoptions()
    np.set_printoptions(threshold=np.inf)
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        np.set_printoptions(**oldoptions)

In your code it can be used like this:

a = np.arange(1001)

print(a)      # shows the truncated array

with show_complete_array():
    print(a)  # shows the complete array

print(a)      # shows the truncated array (again)
  • This is fantastic, nice and short and works really well. – Korzak Jan 2 '18 at 19:53
  • 1
    You should always put a try / finally around the yield in a context manager, so that the cleanup happens no matter what. – Eric Apr 2 '18 at 23:48
  • 1
    @Eric indeed. Thank you for your helpful comment and I have updated the answer. – MSeifert Apr 3 '18 at 6:17
  • In 1.15, this can be spelt with np.printoptions(threshold=np.inf): – Eric Apr 4 '18 at 17:41
5

Complementary to this answer from the maximum number of columns (fixed with numpy.set_printoptions(threshold=numpy.nan)), there is also a limit of characters to be displayed. In some environments like when calling python from bash (rather than the interactive session), this can be fixed by setting the parameter linewidth as following.

import numpy as np
np.set_printoptions(linewidth=2000)    # default = 75
Mat = np.arange(20000,20150).reshape(2,75)    # 150 elements (75 columns)
print(Mat)

In this case, your window should limit the number of characters to wrap the line.

For those out there using sublime text and wanting to see results within the output window, you should add the build option "word_wrap": false to the sublime-build file [source] .

2

Suppose you have a numpy array

 arr = numpy.arange(10000).reshape(250,40)

If you want to print the full array in a one-off way (without toggling np.set_printoptions), but want something simpler (less code) than the context manager, just do

for row in arr:
     print row 
1

You can use the array2string function - docs.

a = numpy.arange(10000).reshape(250,40)
print(numpy.array2string(a, threshold=numpy.nan, max_line_width=numpy.nan))
# [Big output]
1

Since NumPy version 1.16, for more details see GitHub ticket 12251.

from sys import maxsize
from numpy import set_printoptions

set_printoptions(threshold=maxsize)
1

You won't always want all items printed, especially for large arrays.

A simple way to show more items:

In [349]: ar
Out[349]: array([1, 1, 1, ..., 0, 0, 0])

In [350]: ar[:100]
Out[350]:
array([1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1,
       1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
       0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0,
       0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1,
       0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1])

It works fine when sliced array < 1000 by default.

0

To turn it off and return to the normal mode

np.set_printoptions(threshold=False)
-2

If an array is too large to be printed, NumPy automatically skips the central part of the array and only prints the corners: To disable this behaviour and force NumPy to print the entire array, you can change the printing options using set_printoptions.

>>> np.set_printoptions(threshold='nan')

or

>>> np.set_printoptions(edgeitems=3,infstr='inf',
... linewidth=75, nanstr='nan', precision=8,
... suppress=False, threshold=1000, formatter=None)

You can also refer to the numpy documentation numpy documentation for "or part" for more help.

  • 2
    Do not use 'nan', np.nan, or any of the above. It's unsupported, and this bad advice is causing pain for people transitioning to python 3 – Eric Nov 9 '18 at 3:55

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