351

How can I push into an array if neither values exist? Here is my array:

[
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" }
]

If I tried to push again into the array with either name: "tom" or text: "tasty", I don't want anything to happen... but if neither of those are there then I want it to .push()

How can I do this?

5
  • 12
    Use a dictionary (hash/tree) instead of an array. Jan 1, 2010 at 11:16
  • Are all these available in javascript?
    – rahul
    Jan 1, 2010 at 11:18
  • Yes: code.google.com/p/jshashtable
    – Tim Down
    Jan 1, 2010 at 12:45
  • 6
    use a Set
    – Drax
    Apr 23, 2019 at 18:34
  • 2
    Set doesn't work with array of objects
    – rffaguiar
    Oct 8, 2019 at 23:16

29 Answers 29

566

For an array of strings (but not an array of objects), you can check if an item exists by calling .indexOf() and if it doesn't then just push the item into the array:

var newItem = "NEW_ITEM_TO_ARRAY";
var array = ["OLD_ITEM_1", "OLD_ITEM_2"];

array.indexOf(newItem) === -1 ? array.push(newItem) : console.log("This item already exists");

console.log(array)

10
  • 60
    Not sure why this isn't flagged as correct. It doesn't use any externals, doesn't require creating an extension and is dead simple. Perfect answer for ops question.
    – pim
    Sep 14, 2016 at 17:40
  • 53
    In the initial question, the values of the array are objects, not strings (and this solution doesn't work as is if values are objects).
    – Simon Hi
    Nov 7, 2016 at 13:30
  • 14
    @EmilPedersen - not really. Try if (a.indexOf({ name: "tom", text: "tasty" })!=-1) a.push({ name: "tom", text: "tasty" }) twice. It will add a 'similar' object twice.
    – commonpike
    May 4, 2017 at 8:09
  • 29
    This answer should be removed as it is objectively wrong, but still attracted the highest number of upvotes.
    – nikola
    May 24, 2017 at 12:57
  • 8
    This is not a correct answer, why is accepted? It just works to Js arrays, not object within arrays.
    – digitai
    Jun 4, 2017 at 22:19
176

It is quite easy to do using the Array.findIndex function, which takes a function as an argument:

var arrayObj = [{name:"bull", text: "sour"},
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" }
]
var index = arrayObj.findIndex(x => x.name=="bob"); 
// here you can check specific property for an object whether it exist in your array or not

index === -1 ? arrayObj.push({your_object}) : console.log("object already exists")
 
1
  • 2
    most relevant to add an element in the array if not present Mar 31, 2019 at 10:04
129

You could extend the Array prototype with a custom method:

// check if an element exists in array using a comparer function
// comparer : function(currentElement)
Array.prototype.inArray = function(comparer) { 
    for(var i=0; i < this.length; i++) { 
        if(comparer(this[i])) return true; 
    }
    return false; 
}; 

// adds an element to the array if it does not already exist using a comparer 
// function
Array.prototype.pushIfNotExist = function(element, comparer) { 
    if (!this.inArray(comparer)) {
        this.push(element);
    }
}; 

var array = [{ name: "tom", text: "tasty" }];
var element = { name: "tom", text: "tasty" };
array.pushIfNotExist(element, function(e) { 
    return e.name === element.name && e.text === element.text; 
});
7
  • 5
    I think your camparer (comparator?) should take two arguments, this would simplify the case when the added value is inline and not in a variable you can access in your function. array.pushIfNotExist({ name: "tom", text: "tasty" }, function(a,b){ return a.name === b.name && a.text === b.text; }); Jan 1, 2010 at 11:19
  • 39
    I'm wondering why this isn't native to the language - forget how it's implemented - the idea of 'adding only if unique' is so fundamental as to be assumed to exist.
    – justSteve
    Jun 25, 2011 at 15:07
  • 12
    It is better to extend Array prototype with JavaScript 1.6 method IndexOf instead of your inArray. Jul 1, 2013 at 8:16
  • 10
    Array.findIndex() is a built-in JS function that will achieve the same as your code does.
    – user6269864
    Sep 25, 2017 at 4:04
  • 11
    Extending built-in objects directly is a bad practice. Jan 13, 2020 at 6:49
43

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.unique/

var cleanArray = $.unique(clutteredArray);

you might be interested in makeArray too

The previous example is best in saying that check if it exists before pushing. I see in hindsight it also states you can declare it as part of the prototype (I guess that's aka Class Extension), so no big enhancement below.

Except I'm not sure if indexOf is a faster route then inArray? probably.

Array.prototype.pushUnique = function (item){
    if(this.indexOf(item) == -1) {
    //if(jQuery.inArray(item, this) == -1) {
        this.push(item);
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
2
  • 23
    From the jQuery link: Note that this only works on arrays of DOM elements, not strings or numbers. Also, indexOf doesn't work in IE8 :(
    – dmathisen
    Jul 1, 2013 at 18:24
  • You could use lodash _.indexOf, that will work in IE8
    – LTroya
    Oct 4, 2016 at 15:46
35

Like this?

var item = "Hello World";
var array = [];
if (array.indexOf(item) === -1) array.push(item);

With object

var item = {name: "tom", text: "tasty"}
var array = [{}]
if (!array.find(o => o.name === 'tom' && o.text === 'tasty'))
    array.push(item)
3
34

I know this is a very old question, but if you're using ES6 you can use a very small version:

[1,2,3].filter(f => f !== 3).concat([3])

Very easy, at first add a filter which removes the item - if it already exists, and then add it via a concat.

Here is a more realistic example:

const myArray = ['hello', 'world']
const newArrayItem

myArray.filter(f => f !== newArrayItem).concat([newArrayItem])

If you're array contains objects you could adapt the filter function like this:

someArray.filter(f => f.some(s => s.id === myId)).concat([{ id: myId }])
2
  • 3
    Quite an elegant solution here. Thanks! Feb 26, 2019 at 19:45
  • Note this won't retain the strings in the order in which they're first seen
    – duhaime
    Jul 18 at 16:23
33

Push dynamically

var a = [
  {name:"bull", text: "sour"},
  {name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
  {name: "Jerry", text: "tasty" }
]

function addItem(item) {
  var index = a.findIndex(x => x.name == item.name)
  if (index === -1) {
    a.push(item);
  }else {
    console.log("object already exists")
  }
}

var item = {name:"bull", text: "sour"};
addItem(item);

In simple method

var item = {name:"bull", text: "sour"};
a.findIndex(x => x.name == item.name) == -1 ? a.push(item) : console.log("object already exists")

If the array contains only primitive types/ simple array

var b = [1, 7, 8, 4, 3];
var newItem = 6;
b.indexOf(newItem) === -1 && b.push(newItem);
2
  • 2
    Health to your hands.Simple and beautiful solution @Gopala raja naika
    – Kimba
    Feb 12, 2020 at 22:07
  • 2
    This a.findIndex(x => x.name == item.name) is really simple and very useful. Thanks
    – mbielecki1
    Dec 7, 2020 at 13:24
27

Use a js library like underscore.js for these reasons exactly. Use: union: Computes the union of the passed-in arrays: the list of unique items, in order, that are present in one or more of the arrays.

_.union([1, 2, 3], [101, 2, 1, 10], [2, 1]);
=> [1, 2, 3, 101, 10]
2
  • 8
    Note, this returns a new array and doesn't actually push to an existing array.
    – ilovett
    Aug 27, 2014 at 23:05
  • 4
    IMHO there's really no need to bring in a framework to test against something so simple
    – DrewT
    Dec 30, 2015 at 18:59
24

Easy code, if 'indexOf' returns '-1' it means that element is not inside the array then the condition '=== -1' retrieve true/false.

The '&&' operator means 'and', so if the first condition is true we push it to the array.

array.indexOf(newItem) === -1 && array.push(newItem);
4
  • @D.Lawrence Yes, so much better now. Jan 8, 2020 at 8:27
  • There are other accepted answers that provide the OP's question, and they were posted some time ago. When posting an answer see: How do I write a good answer?, please make sure you add either a new solution, or a substantially better explanation, especially when answering older questions. Jan 8, 2020 at 8:30
  • 4
    I think this is a good answer and a better solution so I up-voted it. I don't understand @ help-info.de comment, particularly as there are other answers here which are terrible. Sep 21, 2020 at 21:31
  • does not solve the question, once it will not work if there are objects in the array Dec 29, 2020 at 9:09
18

I would suggest you use a Set,

Sets only allow unique entries, which automatically solves your problem.

Sets can be declared like so:

const baz = new Set(["Foo","Bar"])
3
  • Thanks for pointing that out @Michael. Good solution for when we want to maintain distinct data with minimum effort. FWIW, it's important to note that array performance is better as it requires less CPU to fetch the element when it's needed. Jun 19, 2019 at 7:29
  • The question asks about Array.push, so Set.add is the equivalent to that.
    – bryc
    May 25, 2020 at 12:41
  • @BenjaminLöffel I would expect that Set is implemented as a hash, which would perform about as well as an array for iteration over items. And of course it would perform much better at inserting without duplicates.
    – moodboom
    Apr 27, 2021 at 20:47
9

My choice was to use .includes() extending the Array.prototype as @Darrin Dimitrov suggested:

Array.prototype.pushIfNotIncluded = function (element) {
    if (!this.includes(element)) {
      this.push(element);
    }
}

Just remembering that includes comes from es6 and does not work on IE: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/includes

4

Not sure about speed, but stringification + indexOf is a simple approach. Start with turning your array into a string:

let strMyArray = JSON.stringify(myArray);

Then for a series of attribute-value pairs you can use:

if (strMyArray.indexOf('"name":"tom"') === -1 && strMyArray.indexOf('"text":"tasty"') === -1) {
   myArray.push({ name: "tom", text: "tasty" });
}

Finding a whole object is simpler:

if (strMyArray.indexOf(JSON.stringify(objAddMe) === -1) { 
   myArray.push(objAddMe);
}
3

In case you need something simple without wanting to extend the Array prototype:

// Example array
var array = [{id: 1}, {id: 2}, {id: 3}];

function pushIfNew(obj) {
  for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    if (array[i].id === obj.id) { // modify whatever property you need
      return;
    }
  }
  array.push(obj);
}
3

In case anyone has less complicated requirements, here is my adaptation of the answer for a simple string array:

Array.prototype.pushIfNotExist = function(val) {
    if (typeof(val) == 'undefined' || val == '') { return; }
    val = $.trim(val);
    if ($.inArray(val, this) == -1) {
        this.push(val);
    }
};

Update: Replaced indexOf and trim with jQuery alternatives for IE8 compatability

1
  • it is a nice solution, but why use trim? Jul 15, 2019 at 14:23
2

I used map and reduce to do this in the case where you wish to search by the a specific property of an object, useful as doing direct object equality will often fail.

var newItem = {'unique_id': 123};
var searchList = [{'unique_id' : 123}, {'unique_id' : 456}];

hasDuplicate = searchList
   .map(function(e){return e.unique_id== newItem.unique_id})
   .reduce(function(pre, cur) {return pre || cur});

if (hasDuplicate) {
   searchList.push(newItem);
} else {
   console.log("Duplicate Item");
}
2

You can use the findIndex method with a callback function and its "this" parameter.

Note: old browsers don't know findIndex but a polyfill is available.

Sample code (take care that in the original question, a new object is pushed only if neither of its data is in previoulsy pushed objects):

var a=[{name:"tom", text:"tasty"}], b;
var magic=function(e) {
    return ((e.name == this.name) || (e.text == this.text));
};

b={name:"tom", text:"tasty"};
if (a.findIndex(magic,b) == -1)
    a.push(b); // nothing done
b={name:"tom", text:"ugly"};
if (a.findIndex(magic,b) == -1)
    a.push(b); // nothing done
b={name:"bob", text:"tasty"};
if (a.findIndex(magic,b) == -1)
    a.push(b); // nothing done
b={name:"bob", text:"ugly"};
if (a.findIndex(magic,b) == -1)
    a.push(b); // b is pushed into a
2

I guess i am too late to answer here however this is what i finally came up with for a mail manager i wrote. Works that's all i need.

window.ListManager = [];
$('#add').click(function(){
//Your Functionality
  let data =Math.floor(Math.random() * 5) + 1 
  
  if (window.ListManager.includes(data)){
      console.log("data exists in list")
  }else{
       window.ListManager.push(data);
  }
  
  
  $('#result').text(window.ListManager);
});
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<h1>Unique List</h1>

<p id="result"></p>
<button id="add">Add to List</button>

2

a is the array of objects you have

a.findIndex(x => x.property=="WhateverPropertyYouWantToMatch") <0 ? 
a.push(objectYouWantToPush) : console.log("response if object exists");
2

Removing duplicates after pushing

If you already have an array containing duplicates, transform the array of objects into an array of strings, and then use the Set() function to eliminate duplicates:

let arr_obj = [
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" }, 
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" }
]

let arr_str = arr_obj.map(JSON.stringify)

let arr_unique = [...new Set(arr_str)].map(JSON.parse) 

Checking before pushing

If you don't have duplicates so far and you want to check for duplicates before pushing a new element:

let arr_obj = [
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
    { name: "tim", text: "tusty" }
]

let new_obj = { name: "tom", text: "tasty" }

let arr_str = arr_obj.map(JSON.stringify)

!arr_str.includes(JSON.stringify(new_obj)) && arr_obj.push(new_obj)
3
  • 1
    "use strict"; const EYE_BLEEDING_FULL_OF_COMMENTS_CODE = true; Feb 4 at 22:15
  • 1
    Yeap, you are right, I'm going to edit the answer. Feb 4 at 22:23
  • :) yeah, that nice) now I understand your idea at a glance Feb 5 at 13:20
2

I would prefer to use native js Array.prototype.some() even in jQ env
Docs: w3s some or mdn some

let arr = [
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" },
    { name: "tom", text: "tasty" }
];
let oneMore = { name: "tom", text: "tasty" };
!arr.some(i => i.name == oneMore.name && i.text == oneMore.text)
  && arr.push(oneMore);
0
1

Here you have a way to do it in one line for two arrays:

const startArray = [1,2,3,4]
const newArray = [4,5,6]

const result = [...startArray, ...newArray.filter(a => !startArray.includes(a))]

console.log(result);
//Result: [1,2,3,4,5,6]
1

The question was a litle bit old, but that my option :

    let finalTab = [{id: 1, name: 'dupont'}, {id: 2, name: 'tintin'}, {id: 3, name:'toto'}]; // Your array of object you want to populate with distinct data
    const tabToCompare = [{id: 1, name: 'dupont'}, {id: 4, name: 'tata'}]; // A array with 1 new data and 1 is contain into finalTab
    
    finalTab.push(
      ...tabToCompare.filter(
        tabToC => !finalTab.find(
          finalT => finalT.id === tabToC.id)
      )
    ); // Just filter the first array, and check if data into tabToCompare is not into finalTab, finally push the result of the filters

    console.log(finalTab); // Output : [{id: 1, name: 'dupont'}, {id: 2, name: 'tintin'}, {id: 3, name: 'toto'}, {id: 4, name: 'tata'}];
0

This is working func for an objects comparison. In some cases you might have lot of fields to compare. Simply loop the array and call this function with a existing items and new item.

 var objectsEqual = function (object1, object2) {
        if(!object1 || !object2)
            return false;
        var result = true;
        var arrayObj1 = _.keys(object1);
        var currentKey = "";
        for (var i = 0; i < arrayObj1.length; i++) {
            currentKey = arrayObj1[i];
            if (object1[currentKey] !== null && object2[currentKey] !== null)
                if (!_.has(object2, currentKey) ||
                    !_.isEqual(object1[currentKey].toUpperCase(), object2[currentKey].toUpperCase()))
                    return false;
        }
        return result;
    };
1
0

Short example:

if (typeof(arr[key]) === "undefined") {
  arr.push(key);
}
1
  • 2
    Not correct. We are not interested in pushing the key, we want to push a name-value pair, but only if it does not already exist.
    – Stefan
    Jul 31, 2018 at 14:52
0
someArray = [{a: 'a1 value', b: {c: "c1 value"},
             {a: 'a2 value', b: {c: "c2 value"}]
newObject = {a: 'a2 value', b: {c: "c2 value"}}

//New object which needs check for duplicity

let isExists = checkForExists(newObject) {
    return someArray.some(function(el) {
        return el.a === newObject.a && el.b.c === newObject.b.c;
    });
}
// write your logic here 
// if isExists is true then already object in an array else you can add
1
  • Great use of .some! You're missing the closing } on your two array objects though.
    – zcoop98
    Aug 7, 2020 at 21:46
0

I hade this issue and I made a simple prototype, use it if you liked it

Array.prototype.findOrPush = function(predicate, fallbackVal) {
    let item = this.find(predicate)
    if(!item){
        item = fallbackVal
        this.push(item)
    }
    return item
}

let arr = [{id: 1}]
let item = arr.findOrPush(e => e.id == 2, {id: 2})
console.log(item) // {id: 2} 

// will not push and just return existing value
arr.findOrPush(e => e.id == 2, {id: 2}) 
conslog.log(arr)  // [{id: 1}, {id: 2}]

0

If your project includes loads it will be simple by using unionBy method

import {unionBy} from "lodash";

let arrayObj = [
    { name: "jhon", text: "guitar"},
    { name: "paul", text: "bass" },
    { name: "george", text: "guitar" }
];

// this object will be added to the array
arrayObj = unionBy(arrayObj, [{name: 'ringo', text: 'drums'}], 'name')

// this object will be ignored because already exists  
arrayObj = unionBy(arrayObj, [{name: "jhon", text: "guitar"}], 'name')
-2

You can use jQuery grep and push if no results: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.grep/

It's basically the same solution as in the "extending the prototype" solution, but without extending (or polluting) the prototype.

-2

You can check the array using foreach and then pop the item if it exists otherwise add new item...

sample newItemValue &submitFields are key,value pairs

> //submitFields existing array
>      angular.forEach(submitFields, function(item) {
>                   index++; //newItemValue new key,value to check
>                     if (newItemValue == item.value) {
>                       submitFields.splice(index-1,1);
>                         
>                     } });

                submitFields.push({"field":field,"value":value});
0

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