0

I have a generic class like so:

public class Foo<T>
{
    public string SomeMethod();
    ...
}

I wish to store a list of references to different generic instances of this type. e.g.

List<Foo<object>> foos = new List<Foo<object>>();

foos.Add(new Foo<string>());
foos.Add(new Foo<int>());
foos.Add(new Foo<Person>());

// Then do some processing like ...
foreach (var Foo<object> in foos)
{
     Console.WriteLine(foo.SomeMethod());
}

etc...

Compiler errors on foos.Add call saying:

"Cannot convert from 'Foo<string>' to 'Foo<object>'

How can I store a list of generic type instances where the types differ?

I don't want to have to just store a list of objects (ArrayList, List, List, etc) and have to use reflection to access their members!

  • 2
    Why do you want a generic list if you're going to store different types in it? You can just use a plain ArrayList – Kenneth Nov 10 '13 at 11:47
  • Because I wish to access members of the Foo class and don't want to use reflection to do so. I'll edit my question to make this a little clearer – CodeAndCats Nov 10 '13 at 12:10
  • 1
    Possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/19852034/… – Alberto Nov 10 '13 at 12:15
  • @BenDaniel Then why don't you make Foo a non-generic class? – Kenneth Nov 10 '13 at 12:33
  • @Kenneth Foo has other methods and properties which return instances of T. I would like to keep Foo generic. – CodeAndCats Nov 10 '13 at 12:51
2

You want to create a new interface, and put your SomeMethod() in it, and let your generic implement it. It's the easiest solution. That's why they exists.

If your SomeMethod depends on T, then you need to look into interface covariance and contravariance.

class Program
{
    public interface IFoo
    {
        void DoSomething();
    }

    public interface IGenericFoo<out T> : IFoo
    {
        T GetDefault();
    }


    public class Foo<T> : IGenericFoo<T>
    {
        public T GetDefault()
        {
            return default(T);
        }

        public void DoSomething()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Meep!");
        }
    }


    private static void Main()
    {

        var fooCollection = new List<IFoo>
        {
            new Foo<string>(), 
            new Foo<StringBuilder>(),
            new Foo<int>()

        };
        foreach (var instance in fooCollection)
            instance.DoSomething();

        // Covariance example
        var fooCollectionGenericI = new List<IGenericFoo<object>>
        {
            new Foo<string>(), 
            new Foo<StringBuilder>(),
            // new Foo<int>() not possible since covariance is not supported on structs :( 
        };

        foreach (var instance in fooCollectionGenericI)
        {
            var wxp = instance.GetDefault();
            Console.WriteLine(wxp == null ? "NULL" : wxp.ToString());
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

This covariance can be very useful in some cases.

  • Can you elaborate a little more on covariance and contravariance. I did look into this but had trouble getting my head around it and couldn't get any code to compile. :/ – CodeAndCats Nov 10 '13 at 12:49
  • I've added a little bit of code, which demonstrates how you can keep everything generic, while still doing it through interface. The serious flaw is that it will not work with structs. Mainly becatause that's what covariances support: classes, delegates..*waiting for an explanation* – Erti-Chris Eelmaa Nov 10 '13 at 14:20
  • Excellent. Seems the reason I couldn't get my covariance code working was because I was testing them with value types like int. Thank you! – CodeAndCats Nov 10 '13 at 22:36
6

The T in Foo<T> is not needed to DoSomething(). So you can easily solve the problem by creating an interface for DoSomething() and store the objects in a List<> of that interface:

public interface ISomethingDoer {
    void DoSomething();
}

public class Foo<T> : ISomethingDoer {
    public void DoSomething() { }
}

And -

List<ISomethingDoer> foos = new List<ISomethingDoer>();

foos.Add(new Foo<string>());
foos.Add(new Foo<int>());
foos.Add(new Foo<Person>());

// Then do some processing like ...
foreach (var foo in foos)
{
     Console.WriteLine(foo.DoSomething());
}
  • 1
    Interfaces are the way to go here. Remember that you must put any types-specific logic in the Foo<T> class. This is a mindset that took me a while to grasp: you must design your application in such a way that the type specific logic can be done inside the generic classes. – Moeri Nov 10 '13 at 12:37
  • Thanks @Keith (& @Moeri). Yeah this indeed may be how I should be going about it. I need to think about my actual (more complicated) use case a little more and see if this will suit my requirements. – CodeAndCats Nov 10 '13 at 13:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.