How do I check the class of an object within the PHP name spaced environment without specifying the full namespaced class.

For example suppose I had an object library/Entity/Contract/Name.

The following code does not work as get_class returns the full namespaced class.

If(get_class($object) == 'Name') {
... do this ...
}

The namespace magic keyword returns the current namespace, which is no use if the tested object has another namespace.

I could simply specify the full classname with namespaces, but this seems to lock in the structure of the code. Also not of much use if I wanted to change the namespace dynamically.

Can anyone think of an efficient way to do this. I guess one option is regex.

  • It seems near pointless because different namespaces could have same class names defined inside them, so how will you handle that? And that is because full qualified class name is returned in your sample – Alma Do Nov 11 '13 at 8:30
  • I'm on a mobile device, so I can't submit a decent answer, but the solution is reflection, specifically ReflectionClass::getShortName - php.net/manual/en/reflectionclass.getshortname.php – lonesomeday Nov 11 '13 at 8:55
  • For people looking for a reason to want this: it might be useful in a helper function in a common base class (i.e. multiple namespaces is never an issue in this situation). – Darren Cook Dec 16 '13 at 9:05

19 Answers 19

up vote 136 down vote accepted

You can do this with reflection. Specifically, you can use the ReflectionClass::getShortName method, which gets the name of the class without its namespace.

First, you need to build a ReflectionClass instance, and then call the getShortName method of that instance:

$reflect = new ReflectionClass($object);
if ($reflect->getShortName() === 'Name') {
    // do this
}

However, I can't imagine many circumstances where this would be desirable. If you want to require that the object is a member of a certain class, the way to test it is with instanceof. If you want a more flexible way to signal certain constraints, the way to do that is to write an interface and require that the code implement that interface. Again, the correct way to do this is with instanceof. (You can do it with ReflectionClass, but it would have much worse performance.)

  • instanceof is exactly what I am looking for, but I get a strange result on one hierarchy. I enter echo get_class($tenant) and get Library\Entity\People\Tenant. Then enter var_dump($tenant instanceof Tenant) and get Bool(false) - any thoughts? Maybe I need to log as a separate question. – Greg.Forbes Nov 13 '13 at 7:38
  • 1
    @Greg.Forbes Because Tenant doesn't exist in the current namespace. Try var_dump($tenant instanceof \Library\Entity\People\Tenant) instead. Also, investigate how to use the use operator, and the general concept behind PHP namespaces! – lonesomeday Nov 13 '13 at 8:25
  • 3
    I had to add a slash in front like this $reflect = new \ReflectionClass($object); – prograhammer Mar 12 '14 at 1:19
  • 4
    I generally don't like to do a lot of ReflectionClass voodoo in my application because it can lead to unexpected results if mis-used (protected methods becoming public, etc.). You can use simple string replacement on PHP magic constants instead: str_replace(__NAMESPACE__ . '\\', '', __CLASS__);. It's also much faster, performance-wise. – Franklin P Strube Nov 11 '15 at 23:24
  • @FranklinPStrube Unless I'm missing something, that gets the short name of the current class, rather than the class of the object. I agree that use of reflection usually means you're Doing It Wrong. – lonesomeday Nov 13 '15 at 18:16

(new \ReflectionClass($obj))->getShortName(); is the best solution with regards to performance.

I was curious which of the provided solutions is the fastest, so I've put together a little test.

Results

Reflection: 1.967512512207 s ClassA
Basename:   2.6840535163879 s ClassA
Explode:    2.6507515668869 s ClassA

Code

namespace foo\bar\baz;

class ClassA{
    public function getClassExplode(){
        $c = array_pop(explode('\\', get_class($this)));
        return $c;
    }

    public function getClassReflection(){
        $c = (new \ReflectionClass($this))->getShortName();
        return $c;
    }

    public function getClassBasename(){
        $c = basename(str_replace('\\', '/', get_class($this)));
        return $c;
    }
}

$a = new ClassA();
$num = 100000;

$rounds = 10;
$res = array(
    "Reflection" => array(),
    "Basename" => array(),
    "Explode" => array(),
);

for($r = 0; $r < $rounds; $r++){

    $start = microtime(true);
    for($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
        $a->getClassReflection();
    }
    $end = microtime(true);
    $res["Reflection"][] = ($end-$start);

    $start = microtime(true);
    for($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
        $a->getClassBasename();
    }
    $end = microtime(true);
    $res["Basename"][] = ($end-$start);

    $start = microtime(true);
    for($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
        $a->getClassExplode();
    }
    $end = microtime(true);
    $res["Explode"][] = ($end-$start);
}

echo "Reflection: ".array_sum($res["Reflection"])/count($res["Reflection"])." s ".$a->getClassReflection()."\n";
echo "Basename: ".array_sum($res["Basename"])/count($res["Basename"])." s ".$a->getClassBasename()."\n";
echo "Explode: ".array_sum($res["Explode"])/count($res["Explode"])." s ".$a->getClassExplode()."\n";

The results actually surprised me. I thought the explode solution would be the fastest way to go...

  • 1
    Great answer. I was running the very same code but I got a different result (Macbook Pro i7, 16 GB ram). Reflection:0.382, Basename:0.380, Explode:0.399. I think it depends on your system what is best... – Tobias Nyholm Oct 2 '14 at 9:49
  • 3
    Run PHP 10 000 times with that code and you get a better result. The above might fetch the reflection from some pool, but this is not the usual behaviour of the applications out there. They only need it once or twice. – LeMike Nov 5 '14 at 11:21
  • 4
    I wonder does this test hold true when instantiating a ReflectionClass on a more substantial object than the small object of Class A in your test... – Joe Green Dec 16 '14 at 14:48
  • array_pop may be expensive. Try with end instead, at least then you aren't altering the array contents (although the difference might be trivial). For me reflection is 20% slower than explode, once I fix it so that the result of explode goes to a variable. Otherwise you get notice spam. A suppressed notice might impact performance more than you think. – jgmjgm Oct 3 '17 at 13:58
  • You can also cache get_class, use CLASS, use self/static::class, might only be dealing with a string from elsewhere, etc. strrpos with substr is by far the fastest of all if you want speed. About twice to three times as fast in php7.1. In php 5.6 it's still strrpos > explode > reflection, however the difference is less pronounced. – jgmjgm Oct 3 '17 at 14:11

I added substr to the test of https://stackoverflow.com/a/25472778/2386943 and that's the fastet way I could test (CentOS PHP 5.3.3, Ubuntu PHP 5.5.9) both with an i5.

$classNameWithNamespace=get_class($this);
return substr($classNameWithNamespace, strrpos($classNameWithNamespace, '\\')+1);

Results

Reflection: 0.068084406852722 s ClassA
Basename: 0.12301609516144 s ClassA
Explode: 0.14073524475098 s ClassA
Substring: 0.059865570068359 s ClassA 

Code

namespace foo\bar\baz;
class ClassA{
  public function getClassExplode(){
    $c = array_pop(explode('\\', get_class($this)));
    return $c;
  }

  public function getClassReflection(){
    $c = (new \ReflectionClass($this))->getShortName();
    return $c;
  }

  public function getClassBasename(){
    $c = basename(str_replace('\\', '/', get_class($this)));
    return $c;
  }

  public function getClassSubstring(){
    $classNameWithNamespace = get_class($this);
    return substr($classNameWithNamespace, strrpos($classNameWithNamespace, '\\')+1);
  }
}

$a = new ClassA();
$num = 100000;

$rounds = 10;
$res = array(
    "Reflection" => array(),
    "Basename" => array(),
    "Explode" => array(),
    "Substring" => array()
);

for($r = 0; $r < $rounds; $r++){

  $start = microtime(true);
  for($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
    $a->getClassReflection();
  }
  $end = microtime(true);
  $res["Reflection"][] = ($end-$start);

  $start = microtime(true);
  for($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
    $a->getClassBasename();
  }
  $end = microtime(true);
  $res["Basename"][] = ($end-$start);

  $start = microtime(true);
  for($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
    $a->getClassExplode();
  }
  $end = microtime(true);
  $res["Explode"][] = ($end-$start);

  $start = microtime(true);
  for($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
    $a->getClassSubstring();
  }
  $end = microtime(true);
  $res["Substring"][] = ($end-$start);
}

echo "Reflection: ".array_sum($res["Reflection"])/count($res["Reflection"])." s ".$a->getClassReflection()."\n";
echo "Basename: ".array_sum($res["Basename"])/count($res["Basename"])." s ".$a->getClassBasename()."\n";
echo "Explode: ".array_sum($res["Explode"])/count($res["Explode"])." s ".$a->getClassExplode()."\n";
echo "Substring: ".array_sum($res["Substring"])/count($res["Substring"])." s ".$a->getClassSubstring()."\n";

==UPDATE==

As mentioned in the comments by @MrBandersnatch there is even a faster way to do this:

return substr(strrchr(get_class($this), '\\'), 1);

Here are the updated test results with "SubstringStrChr" (saves up to about 0.001 s):

Reflection: 0.073065280914307 s ClassA
Basename: 0.12585079669952 s ClassA
Explode: 0.14593172073364 s ClassA
Substring: 0.060415267944336 s ClassA
SubstringStrChr: 0.059880912303925 s ClassA
  • 5
    Just because we listing for efficiency I found this to be the fastest, comparison from the test provided in this solution substr(strrchr(get_class($obj), '\\'), 1); Reflection: 0.084223914146423 s ClassA -- Basename: 0.13206427097321 s ClassA -- Explode: 0.15331919193268 s ClassA -- Substring: 0.068068099021912 s ClassA -- Strrchar: 0.06472008228302 s ClassA -- – ctatro85 Oct 6 '15 at 14:55
  • I just came across this thread and added an additional benchmark to test str_replace(__NAMESPACE__ . '\\', '', __CLASS__);. The results on a weak virtual machine showed it to be almost twice as fast as all of these. php -f bench.php Reflection: 0.44037771224976 s ClassA Basename: 0.48089025020599 s ClassA Explode: 0.54955270290375 s ClassA Substring: 0.38200764656067 s ClassA Frank's Custom Benchmark: 0.22782742977142 s ClassA – Franklin P Strube Nov 11 '15 at 23:20
  • @FranklinPStrube you didn't use an object as mentioned in the question (you used __CLASS__ and also __NAMESPACE__ which are pointing to the current file). Therefore it's faster. To be fair, I added your suggestion to the test and ran it. Keep in mind str_replace is slower than substr. Here are the results: Reflection: 0.070202589035034 s TestController Basename: 0.12093763881259 s TestController Explode: 0.12268789609273 s TestController Substring: 0.061004797617594 s TestController Consts: 0.057392239570618 s TestController Your function is the "Consts". – MaBi Nov 12 '15 at 21:24
  • @MrBandersnatch you are correct. I tested your solution and it saved me about 0.001 s. I updated my answer with yours! – MaBi Nov 12 '15 at 21:39
  • 1
    Warning: this code does not work with classes in the global namespace (i.e.: their full name equals their short name)! I advice to test something like: if ($pos = strrchr(static::class, '\\')) { .. } else { ... }. – Tristan Jahier May 31 '16 at 15:57

I use this:

basename(str_replace('\\', '/', get_class($object)));
  • You can also try: $className = explode('\\', basename(get_class($this))); $className = array_pop($className); to get the plain classname. Or use substr. – dompie Feb 25 '14 at 10:24
  • 13
    Works only on Windows On Windows, both slash (/) and backslash () are used as directory separator character. In other environments, it is the forward slash (/) php.net/manual/en/function.basename.php – OzzyCzech Feb 28 '14 at 12:06
  • I have fixed it now. Thanks, @OzzyCzech. – Theodore R. Smith Dec 30 '14 at 5:48
  • 1
    @OzzyCzech I just ran into this while moving from Windows to Ubuntu.... maddening. Wound up using the solution mentioned in MaBi's update. – Chris Baker Dec 14 '15 at 16:20

To get the short name as an one-liner (since PHP 5.4):

echo (new ReflectionClass($obj))->getShortName();

It is a clean approach and reasonable fast.

  • 1
    I wonder how this compares against a string extraction in benchmarks. It seems like this would be much slower. – Unverified Contact Aug 24 '16 at 4:30

Here is a more easier way of doing this if you are using Laravel PHP framework :

<?php

// usage anywhere
// returns HelloWorld
$name = class_basename('Path\To\YourClass\HelloWorld');

// usage inside a class
// returns HelloWorld
$name = class_basename(__CLASS__);
  • 3
    This isn't a builtin php function, it looks like a helper function provided by laravel. – Steve Buzonas Nov 26 '16 at 1:52
  • 5
    I think he said that – Scott Mar 13 '17 at 21:32
  • 4
    Thanks, I'm using Laravel and this answer saved me a bunch of time. – Jeremy Wadhams Apr 21 '17 at 21:49

I found myself in a unique situation where instanceof could not be used (specifically namespaced traits) and I needed the short name in the most efficient way possible so I've done a little benchmark of my own. It includes all the different methods & variations from the answers in this question.

$bench = new \xori\Benchmark(1000, 1000);     # https://github.com/Xorifelse/php-benchmark-closure
$shell = new \my\fancy\namespace\classname(); # Just an empty class named `classname` defined in the `\my\fancy\namespace\` namespace

$bench->register('strrpos', (function(){
    return substr(static::class, strrpos(static::class, '\\') + 1);
})->bindTo($shell));

$bench->register('safe strrpos', (function(){
    return substr(static::class, ($p = strrpos(static::class, '\\')) !== false ? $p + 1 : 0);
})->bindTo($shell));

$bench->register('strrchr', (function(){
    return substr(strrchr(static::class, '\\'), 1);
})->bindTo($shell));

$bench->register('reflection', (function(){
    return (new \ReflectionClass($this))->getShortName();
})->bindTo($shell));

$bench->register('reflection 2', (function($obj){
    return $obj->getShortName();
})->bindTo($shell), new \ReflectionClass($shell));

$bench->register('basename', (function(){
    return basename(str_replace('\\', '/', static::class));
})->bindTo($shell));

$bench->register('explode', (function(){
    $e = explode("\\", static::class);
    return end($e);
})->bindTo($shell));

$bench->register('slice', (function(){
    return join('',array_slice(explode('\\', static::class), -1));
})->bindTo($shell));    

print_r($bench->start());

A list of the of the entire result is here but here are the highlights:

  • If you're going to use reflection anyways, using $obj->getShortName() is the fastest method however; using reflection only to get the short name it is almost the slowest method.
  • 'strrpos' can return a wrong value if the object is not in a namespace so while 'safe strrpos' is a tiny bit slower I would say this is the winner.
  • To make 'basename' compatible between Linux and Windows you need to use str_replace() which makes this method the slowest of them all.

A simplified table of results, speed is measured compared to the slowest method:

+-----------------+--------+
| registered name | speed  |
+-----------------+--------+
| reflection 2    | 70.75% |
| strrpos         | 60.38% |
| safe strrpos    | 57.69% |
| strrchr         | 54.88% |
| explode         | 46.60% |
| slice           | 37.02% |
| reflection      | 16.75% |
| basename        | 0.00%  |
+-----------------+--------+

Here is simple solution for PHP 5.4+

namespace {
    trait Names {
        public static function getNamespace() {
            return implode('\\', array_slice(explode('\\', get_called_class()), 0, -1));
        }

        public static function getBaseClassName() {
            return basename(str_replace('\\', '/', get_called_class()));
        }
    }
}

What will be return?

namespace x\y\z {
    class SomeClass {
        use \Names;
    }

    echo \x\y\z\SomeClass::getNamespace() . PHP_EOL; // x\y\z
    echo \x\y\z\SomeClass::getBaseClassName() . PHP_EOL; // SomeClass
}

Extended class name and namespace works well to:

namespace d\e\f {

    class DifferentClass extends \x\y\z\SomeClass {

    }

    echo \d\e\f\DifferentClass::getNamespace() . PHP_EOL; // d\e\f
    echo \d\e\f\DifferentClass::getBaseClassName() . PHP_EOL; // DifferentClass
}

What about class in global namespace?

namespace {

    class ClassWithoutNamespace {
        use \Names;
    }

    echo ClassWithoutNamespace::getNamespace() . PHP_EOL; // empty string
    echo ClassWithoutNamespace::getBaseClassName() . PHP_EOL; // ClassWithoutNamespace
}

Yii way

\yii\helpers\StringHelper::basename(get_class($model));

Yii uses this method in its Gii code generator

Method documentation

This method is similar to the php function basename() except that it will treat both \ and / as directory separators, independent of the operating system. This method was mainly created to work on php namespaces. When working with real file paths, php's basename() should work fine for you. Note: this method is not aware of the actual filesystem, or path components such as "..".

More information:

https://github.com/yiisoft/yii2/blob/master/framework/helpers/BaseStringHelper.php http://www.yiiframework.com/doc-2.0/yii-helpers-basestringhelper.html#basename()-detail

  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please provide more information for your answer. What does this do and how can one use it. – Jens Apr 16 '17 at 21:53
  • 1
    This worked for me on Windows but not on Linux, maybe because namespaces are in a form of Windows directories backslashes '\' , whereas linux basename considers directory separators forward slashes '/'. So I worked it around with strtr.' basename(strtr($class,'\\','/')) – FantomX1 Dec 6 '17 at 17:46

If you need to know the class name that was called from inside a class, and don't want the namespace, you can use this one

$calledClass = get_called_class();
$name = strpos($calledClass, '\\') === false ?
    $calledClass : substr($calledClass, strrpos($calledClass, '\\') + 1);

This is great when you have a method inside a class which is extended by other classes. Furthermore, this also works if namespaces aren't used at all.

Example:

<?php
namespace One\Two {
    class foo
    {
        public function foo()
        {
            $calledClass = get_called_class();
            $name = strpos($calledClass, '\\') === false ?
                $calledClass : substr($calledClass, strrpos($calledClass, '\\') + 1);

            var_dump($name);
        }
    }
}

namespace Three {
    class bar extends \One\Two\foo
    {
        public function bar()
        {
            $this->foo();
        }
    }
}

namespace {
    (new One\Two\foo)->foo();
    (new Three\bar)->bar();
}

// test.php:11:string 'foo' (length=3)
// test.php:11:string 'bar' (length=3)

You can use explode for separating the namespace and end to get the class name:

$ex = explode("\\", get_class($object));
$className = end($ex);
  • I've made the same. So many overhead solutions here... – Kirby Jul 10 at 11:43

Based on @MaBi 's answer, I made this:

trait ClassShortNameTrait
{
    public static function getClassShortName()
    {
        if ($pos = strrchr(static::class, '\\')) {
            return substr($pos, 1);
        } else {
            return static::class;
        }
    }
}

Which you may use like that:

namespace Foo\Bar\Baz;

class A
{
    use ClassShortNameTrait;
}

A::class returns Foo\Bar\Baz\A, but A::getClassShortName() returns A.

Works for PHP >= 5.5.

Found on the documentation page of get_class, where it was posted by me at nwhiting dot com.

function get_class_name($object = null)
{
    if (!is_object($object) && !is_string($object)) {
        return false;
    }

    $class = explode('\\', (is_string($object) ? $object : get_class($object)));
    return $class[count($class) - 1];
}

But the idea of namespaces is to structure your code. That also means that you can have classes with the same name in multiple namespaces. So theoretically, the object you pass could have the name (stripped) class name, while still being a totally different object than you expect.

Besides that, you might want to check for a specific base class, in which case get_class doesn't do the trick at all. You might want to check out the operator instanceof.

You may get an unexpected result when the class doesn't have a namespace. I.e. get_class returns Foo, then $baseClass would be oo.

$baseClass = substr(strrchr(get_class($this), '\\'), 1);

This can easily be fixed by prefixing get_class with a backslash:

$baseClass = substr(strrchr('\\'.get_class($this), '\\'), 1);

Now also classes without a namespace will return the right value.

Quoting php.net:

On Windows, both slash (/) and backslash () are used as directory separator character. In other environments, it is the forward slash (/).

Based on this info and expanding from arzzzen answer this should work on both Windows and Nix* systems:

<?php

if (basename(str_replace('\\', '/', get_class($object))) == 'Name') {
    // ... do this ...
}

Note: I did a benchmark of ReflectionClass against basename+str_replace+get_class and using reflection is roughly 20% faster than using the basename approach, but YMMV.

The fastest and imho easiest solution that works in any environment is:

<?php

namespace \My\Awesome\Namespace;

class Foo {

  private $shortName;

  public function fastShortName() {
    if ($this->shortName === null) {
      $this->shortName = explode("\\", static::class);
      $this->shortName = end($this->shortName);
    }
    return $this->shortName;
  }

  public function shortName() {
    return basename(strtr(static::class, "\\", "/"));
  }

}

echo (new Foo())->shortName(); // "Foo"

?>
  • 1
    This is why I wish PHP had internal class information operators. Instantiating an external reflector to do what should be as simple as $Object->__class->getShortName() really pisses me off about PHP. Your approach works, but now you're putting concrete methods in your classes just to expose what should be a language construct. – AgmLauncher Apr 14 '14 at 15:31
  • PHP without “concrete” (or should we call them procedural) functions is impossible. Let's wait for PHP 6 (well, if it ever comes). – Fleshgrinder Apr 14 '14 at 16:33
$shortClassName = join('',array_slice(explode('\\', $longClassName), -1));

If you're just stripping name spaces and want anything after the last \ in a class name with namespace (or just the name if there's no '\') you can do something like this:

$base_class = preg_replace('/^([\w\\\\]+\\\\)?([^\\\\]+)$/', '$2', get_class($myobject));

Basically it's regex to get any combination of characters or backslashes up and until the last backslash then to return only the non-backslash characters up and until the end of the string. Adding the ? after the first grouping means if the pattern match doesn't exist, it just returns the full string.

A good old regex seems to be faster than the most of the previous shown methods:

// both of the below calls will output: ShortClassName

echo preg_replace('/.*\\\\/', '', 'ShortClassName');
echo preg_replace('/.*\\\\/', '', 'SomeNamespace\SomePath\ShortClassName');

So this works even when you provide a short class name or a fully qualified (canonical) class name.

What the regex does is that it consumes all previous chars until the last separator is found (which is also consumed). So the remaining string will be the short class name.

If you want to use a different separator (eg. / ) then just use that separator instead. Remember to escape the backslash (ie. \) and also the pattern char (ie. /) in the input pattern.

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