Is it possible to roll back automatically if any error occurs on a list of mysql commands?

for example something along the lines of:

begin transaction;

insert into myTable values1 ...
insert into myTable values2 ...;  -- will throw an error

commit;

now, on execute i want the whole transaction to fail, and therefore i should NOT see values1 in myTable. but unfortunately the table is being pupulated with values1 even though the transaction has errors.

any ideas how i make it to roll back? (again, on any error)?

EDIT - changed from DDL to standard SQL

up vote 39 down vote accepted

You can use 13.6.7.2. DECLARE ... HANDLER Syntax in the following way:

DELIMITER $$

CREATE PROCEDURE `sp_fail`()
BEGIN
    DECLARE `_rollback` BOOL DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR SQLEXCEPTION SET `_rollback` = 1;
    START TRANSACTION;
    INSERT INTO `tablea` (`date`) VALUES (NOW());
    INSERT INTO `tableb` (`date`) VALUES (NOW());
    INSERT INTO `tablec` (`date`) VALUES (NOW()); -- FAIL
    IF `_rollback` THEN
        ROLLBACK;
    ELSE
        COMMIT;
    END IF;
END$$

DELIMITER ;

For a complete example, check the following SQL Fiddle.

  • my question is, Is this stored procedure is going to be persisted in database forever?. – MDaniyal Sep 1 '16 at 7:06
  • @MDaniyal Short answer: Yes. – RnMss Oct 18 '16 at 11:51
  • 3
    Thanks for the answer :) .Do you think it is a good idea that we save a new stored procedure for every new script? as we have 10 to 15 scripts per release so we would have hundreds of stored procedures. – MDaniyal Oct 18 '16 at 19:20
  • If the exception occurs in the 1st INSERT, wouldn't MySQL do the 2nd and 3rd ones, leading sometimes to unexpected results? – Xenos Apr 25 '17 at 12:23
  • @Xenos No, though time will be wasted. If either of the first two queries fails, _rollback is still set to 1 and so the function will execute ROLLBACK; instead of COMMIT;. However, the following queries will still execute (within the transaction) only to be ultimately rolled back later. It really baffles me that MySQL chose this continue-on-error behavior. Contrast this to PostgreSQL, which places the transaction in a failed state, guarantees all future queries in the transaction will fail (except ROLLBACK TO) and will implicitly rollback on commit. – cdhowie Jun 2 at 15:35

You could use EXIT HANDLER if you for example need to SIGNAL a specific SQL EXCEPTION in your code. For instance:

DELIMITER $$

CREATE PROCEDURE `sp_fail`()
BEGIN
    DECLARE EXIT HANDLER FOR SQLEXCEPTION
    BEGIN
        ROLLBACK;  -- rollback any changes made in the transaction
        RESIGNAL;  -- raise again the sql exception to the caller
    END;

    START TRANSACTION;
    insert into myTable values1 ...
    IF fail_condition_meet THEN
        SIGNAL SQLSTATE '45000' SET MESSAGE_TEXT = 'Custom error detected.', MYSQL_ERRNO = 2000;
    END IF;
    insert into myTable values2 ...  -- this will not be executed
    COMMIT; -- this will not be executed
END$$

DELIMITER ;

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