18

Can I write a program in C or in C++ with two main functions?

  • 7
    What would you expect them to do? Which one should be called? – Peter Lang Jan 2 '10 at 8:01
  • 19
    To paraphrase Confucius, the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single entry point. You can't have two main()s. – John Feminella Jan 2 '10 at 8:39
  • 3
    Dunno if it's relevant, but some programs (e.g. busybox) have a main() implementation that checks the value of argv[0] and then calls through to the relevant something_else_main() function, depending on argv[0]'s value. That way you can have a single executable act in completely different ways depending on its filename. Used in conjunction with symbolic links, this can save disk space since no shared code needs to be duplicated in multiple executables. (a shared library could do the same thing, but it's more of a hassle to maintain) – Jeremy Friesner Jan 2 '10 at 18:36
  • @JeremyFriesner, int main(int argc, char **argv) { int (*start)(int, char **); if (strcmp(argv[0], "file_name1") == 0) start = start_file_name1; else if (strcmp(argv[0], "file_name2") == 0) start = start_file_name2; /* etc */ else start = start_other; return start(argc, argv); } What's wrong with this that you would want two mains? Also, how does having two mains make the executable choose which one to call based on the file name? – Shahbaz Jun 30 '13 at 19:14
  • @Shahbaz there's nothing wrong with that code that I can see, although the use of a function-pointer isn't strictly necessary -- i.e. you could have just called start_file_name1(argc,argv) [etc] directly from within the if-then clauses instead, if you wanted to. As far as having two main()'s, you can't really do that, since you'd get a link error (duplicate function name). But you can have several functions that are similar to main() but called something else, and main() calls them (like in your example). – Jeremy Friesner Jun 30 '13 at 20:27

16 Answers 16

28

No. All programs have a single main(), that's how the compiler and linker generate an executable that start somewhere sensible.

You basically have two options:

  1. Have the main() interpret some command line arguments to decide what actual main to call. The drawback is that you are going to have an executable with both programs.

  2. Create a library out of the shared code and compile each main file against that library. You'll end up with two executables.

  • how about this geeksforgeeks.org/output-of-a-program-set-2 int main() { static int i=5; if(--i){ main(); printf("%d ",i); } } – Sourav Nanda Sep 20 '16 at 14:36
  • This answer is incorrect. While there may be only one definition of main with external linkage, the C standard does not clearly prohibit additional definitions with internal linkage (declared with static). Apple LLVM 10.0.0 with clang-1000.11.45.5, at least, accepts this and produces an executable, albeit with a warning. – Eric Postpischil Feb 24 at 13:24
16

You can have two functions called main. The name is not special in any way and it's not reserved. What's special is the function, and it happens to have that name. The function is global. So if you write a main function in some other namespace, you will have a second main function.

namespace kuppusamy {
  int main() { return 0; } 
}

int main() { kuppusamy::main(); }

The first main function is not special - notice how you have to return explicitly.

  • Don't you need to return explicitly in the 'real' main() as well? Right now it's not defined what result code your posted program will return (AFAIK) – Jeremy Friesner Jan 2 '10 at 18:33
  • 5
    No, the real main() does not require a return value, it defaults to 0. – Chinmay Kanchi Jan 2 '10 at 18:48
  • Chinmay: To be precise, ::main doesn't require a return statement, where it defaults to return 0; (return; is not valid). And the return type must remain int regardless. And using this in any way other than to point out how ::main is special is dubious, YMMV. – Roger Pate Jan 3 '10 at 7:53
  • The name really is special and reserved, but it's ::main instead of main (just like ::_a is reserved but ns::_a is not), where I'm not sure the OP really understood that he could make this distinction, much less that he should. – Roger Pate Jan 3 '10 at 9:08
  • 1
    @Roger, and notice that you are allowed to declare struct main { }; in the global namespace, i think - disproving the statement that ::main would be a name reserved for the main function :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 3 '10 at 14:03
12

Yes; however, it's platform specific instead of standard C, and if you ask about what you really want to achieve (instead of this attempted solution to that problem), then you'll likely receive answers which are more helpful for you.

  • 1
    The link to "weak symbols" does not really support your assertion, the final program would still only have one entry point to one main() function. The concrete main symbol would simply override the weak one. – Clifford Jan 2 '10 at 12:07
  • 6
    "Can I write a program in C or in C++ with two main functions?" Yes, the source code, which is the program in C/C++, will have two main functions. The compiled version, which is the program in machine code, will still have two main functions. The linked version, which is actually run on the computer, will only have one. However, the real point of my answer is that he's asking the wrong question, and the answer to it almost certainly doesn't matter, and what he should do is ask a different question. – Roger Pate Jan 2 '10 at 12:25
6

No, a program can have just 1 entry point(which is main()). In fact, more generally, you can only have one function of a given name in C.

4

No, main() defines the entry point to your program and you must only one main() function(entry point) in your program.

Frankly speaking your question doesn't make much sense to me.

4

If one is static and resides in a different source file I don't see any problem.

2

What do you mean by "main function"? If you mean the first function to execute when the program starts, then you can have only one. (You can only have one first!)

If you want to have your application do different things on start up, you can write a main function which reads the command line (for example) and then decides which other function to call.

2

In some very special architecture, you can. This is the case of the Cell Processor where you have a main program for the main processor (64-bit PowerPC Processors Element called PPE) and one or many main program for the 8 different co-processor (32-bit Synergistic Processing Element called SPE).

  • 1
    Wouldn't that just be nine separate programs rather than one program with nine entry points!? – Clifford Jan 2 '10 at 12:05
  • What you say is true, but it would be more accurate to represent a SPE as a "physical thread" where the SPE main function would be the entry point of the thread. (this would become MultiProcess Multi-Thread debate ^^) – Phong Jan 2 '10 at 13:36
1

No, you cannot have more than one main() function in C language. In standard C language, the main() function is a special function that is defined as the entry point of the program. There cannot be more than one copy of ANY function you create in C language, or in any other language for that matter - unless you specify different signatures. But in case of main(), i think you got no choice ;)

0

No,The main() is the entry point to your program,since u can't have two entry points you cant have two main().

0

You can write it, and it'll compile, but it won't link (unless your linker is non-comformant)

0

The idiom is to dispatch on the value of argv[0]. With hardlinks (POSIX) you don't even lose diskspace.

-1

Standard C doesn’t allow nested functions but GCC allows them.

void main()

{

void main()

{

printf(“stackoverflow”);

}

printf(“hii”);

}

The o/p for this code will be -hii

if you use GCC compiler.

There is a simple trick if you want to use 2 main() in your program such that both are successfully executed;you can use define.Example-

void main()

{

printf("In 1st main\n");

func1();

}

#define main func1

void main()

{

printf("In 2nd main\n");

}

Here the o/p will be:

In 1st main

In 2nd main

NOTE:here warning conflicting types of func1 will be generated.

And yes don’t change the place of define.

-2

This might be the answer for your query

void main()
{
    func1();
}
#define main func1
void main()
{
    printf("inside 2nd main");
}
-2

Not in C, C++

but now C#.net introduce trick you can use 2 mains in one application. i implemented in my application too. I have scenario and requirement and implemented it successfully.

reference and proof is here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJcBj3hLIpM

-2

Yes , Multiple main() are allowed but not in global namespace.

"Every C++ program must have exactly one global function named main()" - Bjarne stroustrup.

Eg 1 :

namespace foo
{
  int main() //Main 1 
  {
    return 1;
  }
}

int main() // Main 2   
{

}

// Main 1 : namespace is foo

// Main 2 : namespace is global

// Allowed : Yes , its allowed as both the main() are present in different namespaces.

Eg 2 :

int main() //Main 1 
{
    return 1;
}

void main() // Main 2   
{

}

// Main 1 : namespace is global

// Main 2 : namespace is global

// Allowed : No , as multiple main() in global namespace . Compile-time error is thrown : redefinition of main() .. 
  • 1
    litb's answer (from 2010) already mentions this. – melpomene Nov 6 '17 at 14:29
  • Yes , but i got the exact words of Bjarne from his book and explained with example – Jay Teli Nov 6 '17 at 14:30
  • litb's answer also explains this with an example. What do you mean by "his book"? Stroustrup is the author of several books, none of which are normative. C++ is defined by an international standard, not a book. – melpomene Nov 6 '17 at 14:31
  • the c++ programming language 4th edition – Jay Teli Nov 6 '17 at 14:32
  • @melpomene : There was no need to downvote. My Answer is correct and explanation is more clear , So i contributed on this answer and you just downvoted it. – Jay Teli Nov 6 '17 at 14:36

protected by Antti Haapala Feb 24 at 8:50

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