9

Just like in the movies and in games, the location of a place comes up on screen as if it's being typed live. I want to make a game about escaping a maze in python. At the start of the game it gives the background information of the game:

line_1 = "You have woken up in a mysterious maze"
line_2 = "The building has 5 levels"
line_3 = "Scans show that the floors increase in size as you go down"

Under the variables, I tried to do a for loop for each line similar to this:

from time import sleep

for x in line_1:
    print (x)
    sleep(0.1)

The only problem with this is that it print one letter per line. The timing of it is ok, but how can I get it to go on one line?

0

7 Answers 7

14

Because you tagged your question with python 3 I will provide a python 3 solution:

  1. Change your end character of print to an empty string: print(..., end='')
  2. Add sys.stdout.flush() to make it print instantly (because the output is buffered)

Final code:

from time import sleep
import sys

for x in line_1:
    print(x, end='')
    sys.stdout.flush()
    sleep(0.1)

Making it random is also very simple.

  1. Add this import:

    from random import uniform
    
  2. Change your sleep call to the following:

    sleep(uniform(0, 0.3))  # random sleep from 0 to 0.3 seconds
    
1
  • 3
    An alternative is print(x, end='', flush=True). It's a bit easier to read.
    – Honesty
    Commented Jul 26, 2016 at 21:14
12
lines = ["You have woken up in a mysterious maze",
         "The building has 5 levels",
         "Scans show that the floors increase in size as you go down"]

from time import sleep
import sys

for line in lines:          # for each line of text (or each message)
    for c in line:          # for each character in each line
        print(c, end='')    # print a single character, and keep the cursor there.
        sys.stdout.flush()  # flush the buffer
        sleep(0.1)          # wait a little to make the effect look good.
    print('')               # line break (optional, could also be part of the message)
9
  • The comma will add a space between characters
    – grieve
    Commented Nov 11, 2013 at 16:39
  • 2
    Not in Python3, it won't. And the question is tagged python3.
    – Robᵩ
    Commented Nov 11, 2013 at 16:41
  • For me, it doesn't make a difference, and when I use NPE's answer to shorten the amount of code, it prints each line with the delay.
    – David K.
    Commented Nov 11, 2013 at 16:42
  • Made it loop the lines for you.
    – Inbar Rose
    Commented Nov 11, 2013 at 16:43
  • 1
    I tested this on Python 3.4.3 / Ubuntu Linux, and observed that 1) all the output is glued together, with no line breaks or other whitespace between the lines, and 2) no output actually appears before the program exits, presumably because Python is buffering the printed text. You might want to fix these issues. Commented Oct 4, 2015 at 13:16
2

To iterate over the lines, change the loop to:

for x in (line_1, line_2, line_3):
2
  • Thank you, that will save me a lot of time when writing the loops.
    – David K.
    Commented Nov 11, 2013 at 16:39
  • 1
    or possibly for x in '\n'.join(line_1, line_2, line_3): Commented Nov 11, 2013 at 16:55
2

You can change the end of line character automatically added by print with print("", end=""). To printfoobar, you could do this:

print("foo", end="")
print("bar", end="")

From the documentation:

All non-keyword arguments are converted to strings like str() does and written to the stream, separated by sep and followed by end. Both sep and end must be strings; they can also be None, which means to use the default values.

1

Python Typewriter Effect

For every letter in the string, my answer provides 0.1 of a second to wait, so the text would appear one by one. Python 3 allows the use of sys.stdout.write.

import time, sys

def anything(str):


for letter in str:
  sys.stdout.write(letter)
  sys.stdout.flush()
  time.sleep(0.1)

anything("Blah Blah Blah...")

Your full code will look like this:

import time, sys

def anything(str):


  for letter in str:
    sys.stdout.write(letter)
    sys.stdout.flush()
    time.sleep(0.1)

anything("You have woken up in a 
mysterious maze")

anything("The building has five 
levels")

anything("Scans show that the floors 
increase in size as you go down")
1
  • It would be good to give a more in-depth explanation in your answer so OP understands why how and/or why that solves their problem.
    – Sienna
    Commented Nov 22, 2019 at 20:05
1

It's easiest solving:

import time
def tt(text, delay):
    for i in text:
        print(end = i)
        time.sleep(delay)
print(tt("sample text", 0.2)
2
  • 1
    That looks like a great solution but could you please edit the answer to include some explanation for the code?
    – tshimkus
    Commented Jul 10, 2020 at 17:35
  • yes, i import time for sleeping, then it prints i in the end of line, then sleep and again and again before end
    – SsNipeR1
    Commented Jun 23, 2021 at 12:35
0

This solution will not change ur algorithm

   from time import sleep

   line_1 = "You have woken up in a mysterious maze"
   line_2 = "The building has 5 levels"
   line_3 = "Scans show that the floors increase in size as you go down"

   for x in line_1:
       print(x, end='')
       sleep(0.05)

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