23

I have a bash script which generates a motd. The problem is depending on some terminal settings which I am not sure about the color will extend to the end of the line. Othertimes it doesn't:

e.g.

square

v.s.

jagged

IIRC one is just the normal gnome-terminal and the other is my tmux term. So my question is how can I get this to extend to 80 character (or really to the terminal width). Of course I can pad to 80 chars but that really doesn't solve the problem.

Here is a snip of my code which generates the motd:

TC_RESET="^[[0m"                                                                
TC_SKY="^[[0;37;44m"                                                            
TC_GRD="^[[0;30;42m"                                                            
TC_TEXT="^[[38;5;203m"   

echo -n "${TC_SKY}                                                                              

... lots of printing..." 
echo -e "\n                           Welcome to Mokon's Linux!                           \n"

echo -n "${TC_GRD}"                                                             
nodeinfo # Just prints the info seen below...                                                                       
echo ${TC_RESET} 

How can I programmatically from bash change the terminal settings or something change the color to the end of the line?

2
  • 1
    You could simply flush your screen before typing anything: echo $'\e[33;44;1m\e[H\e[J' at top of your script. Commented Nov 18, 2013 at 15:03
  • @F.Hauri Thanks. How do I turn the screen back to normal now after that? Commented Jul 13, 2017 at 21:50

3 Answers 3

21
+50

Maybe use the Escape sequence to clear-to-EOL

For some reason (on my MacOS terminal!) I only needed specify this sequence and then it worked for all the lines but for completeness I list it for all

TC_RESET=$'\x1B[0m'
TC_SKY=$'\x1B[0;37;44m'
TC_GRD=$'\x1B[0;30;42m'
TC_TEXT=$'\x1B[38;5;203m'
CLREOL=$'\x1B[K'

echo -n "${TC_SKY}${CLREOL}"
echo -e "\n           ABC${CLREOL}\n"
echo -e "\n              DEFG${CLREOL}\n"

echo -n "${TC_GRD}"
echo -e "\n           ABC${CLREOL}\n"
echo -e "\n              DEFG${CLREOL}\n"
echo ${TC_RESET}
8
  • 3
    Thank You! And Thanks to the others who also tried but this solutions works the way I was hoping. I made a few alterations. Basically I append to a temp file and then use send to replace all the newlines with a newline and that char. If I don't put that escape sequence on each line I only get it on the lines with it... I'll add that to your answer for others... Commented Nov 18, 2013 at 23:35
  • @DavidMokonBond My sample was based on experimentation on my Mac, obviously you are using a wider set of terminals. So I updated my answer - can you validate?
    – nhed
    Commented Nov 19, 2013 at 16:45
  • I don't use tmux, what is the reported terminal type (${TERM}) and is the behaviour similar on screen?
    – nhed
    Commented Jan 18, 2015 at 2:50
  • Yes, its very similar to screen. For now I just sent it through sed and padded it to 80 chars which works enough for me. Here is the term: i:echo ${TERM} screen-256color After googling a bit I think it might be due to tmux not supporting all the same term features such as the eol line one you are using but I'm not really sure Commented Jan 18, 2015 at 2:59
  • 1
    The clear-to-EOL works perfectly on OS X/macOS (tested most recently on OS X 10.11.6) in the standard Terminal. Thanks for this great tip!
    – bluebinary
    Commented Dec 27, 2016 at 0:14
3

Padding filter

Unfortunely, you have to pad each line with exact number of spaces for changing the color of the whole line's background.

As you're speaking about , my solution will use bashisms (Won't work under other shell, or older version of bash).

  • syntax printf -v VAR FORM ARGS assign to varianble VAR then result of sprintf FORM ARGS. That's bashism, under other kind of shell, you have to replace this line by TC_SPC=$(printf "%${COLUMNS}s" '')

You may try this:

... lots of printing..." 
echo -e "\n                           Welcome to Mokon's Linux!                           \n"

echo -n "${TC_GRD}"

printf -v TC_SPC "%${COLUMNS}s" ''

nodeinfo |
    sed "s/$/$TC_SPC/;s/^\\(.\\{${COLUMNS}\\}\\) */\\1/" # Just prints the info seen below...

echo ${TC_RESET}

enter image description here Maybe you have to ensure that $COLUMNS is correctly setted:

COLUMNS=$(tput cols)

As you could see, only the result of command filtered by sed is fully colored.

you may

  • use same filter many times:

    cmd1 | sed '...'
    cmd2 | sed '...'
    
  • or group your commands to use only one filter:

    ( cmd1 ; cmd 2 ) | sed '...'
    

But there is an issue in case you try to filter ouptut that contain formatting escapes:

(
    echo $'\e[33;44;1mYellow text on blue background';
    seq 1 6;
    echo $'\e[0m'
) | sed "
  s/$/$TC_SPC/;
  s/^\\(.\\{${COLUMNS}\\}\\) */\\1/"

unterminated sample

Il the lines you have to pad to contain escapes, you have to isolate thems:

(
    echo $'\e[33;44;1mYellow text on blue background';
    seq 1 6;
    echo $'\e[0m'
) | sed "
  s/\$/$TC_SPC/;
  s/^\\(\\(\\o33\\[[0-9;]*[a-zA-Z]\\)*\\)\\([^\o033]\\{${COLUMNS}\\}\\) */\\1\\3/
"

enter image description here

And finally to be able to fill terminate very long lines:

(
    echo $'\e[33;44;1mYellow text on blue background';
    seq 1 6;
    echo "This is a very very long long looooooooooong line that contain\
       more characters than the line could hold...";
    echo $'\e[0m';
) | sed "            
  s/\$/$TC_SPC/;
  s/^\\(\\(\\o33\\[[0-9;]*[a-zA-Z]\\)*\\)\\(\\([^\o033]\\{${COLUMNS}\\}\\)*\\) */\\1\\3/"

Nota: This only work if formating escapes are located at begin of line.

1

Try with this:

echo -e '\E[33;44m'"yellow text on blue background"; tput sgr0
0

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