1

Suppose I have the following Makefile with an intentional error in line 4:

define TEMPLATE
all:

this line contains some errors
endef

$(eval $(call TEMPLATE))

When I run I get this:

$ make-3.81
Makefile:7: *** missing separator.  Stop.
$

Make is telling me that there is an error in line 7, which is technically correct because the TEMPLATE variable is expanded on line 7. But this is not tremendously useful. In order to quickly debug this sort of thing it would be much more handy if could somehow point me directly to the error on line 4. Is there any way to do this?

In case it makes any difference, this is GNU make-3.81.

  • 1
    No, there's no way to do that. However you can see what the expansion is by changing $(eval ...) to $(info ...). Then make will print out the result of the call function and you can look at it. – MadScientist Nov 11 '13 at 21:54
  • Would it be possible, as a change to make itself, to allow it to support per-eval line numbers? So that make would report Makefile:7:eval:3 or some-such thing? – Etan Reisner Nov 11 '13 at 23:50
  • Of course such a thing is possible. – MadScientist Nov 12 '13 at 12:31
1

Electric Make, a high-performance GNU-make-compatible implementation of make, reports errors the way you want:

$ cat Makefile 
define BOGUS
foo: bar
    abcd

endef

$(eval $(BOGUS))
$ gmake
Makefile:7: *** missing separator.  Stop.
$ emake
Makefile:7:eval:2: *** missing separator.  Stop.

It's a commercial product, but you can download a free version from Electric Cloud.

Disclaimer: I am the architect of Electric Make

  • Thanks Eric! Ideally I am looking for a pure GNU make solution, but with a little digging, it appears that we have a licensed version of emake. This solves my immediate problem, so I am accepting your answer. But I may change this if someone can point to a valid way to do this with vanilla GNU make. – Digital Trauma Nov 12 '13 at 14:38

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