39

Want to disable back button for a website

whenever the person click on browser back button it should not be able to go on the page he visited before.

  • 8
    (a) Such a horrible idea from a usability perspective. (b) See: stackoverflow.com/questions/12381563/… – xbonez Nov 12 '13 at 10:29
  • 2
    Do you intend to pi*s visitors off? Because that's all you will accomplish with this. – ggdx Nov 12 '13 at 10:31
  • 2
    You simply cannot and should not do this. However, you might find the unload event useful. – Boaz Nov 12 '13 at 10:35
  • 22
    there is a time, place, and need for everything. but the haters have to hate. I could list a bunch of reasons in today's ajax powered web apps where this would be necessary. – pathfinder Jan 29 '15 at 15:43
  • try this , a different approach geekswithblogs.net/Frez/archive/2010/05/18/… – Syed Mohamed Feb 11 '15 at 15:35
-39

You can't, and you shouldn't.

every other approach / alternative will only cause really bad user engagement.

that's my opinion.

| improve this answer | |
  • 55
    Let's say you are on an online exam, then it got a little sense. – Sanchitos Dec 23 '13 at 19:27
  • 4
    I think an alert and confirm would work better – Claudiu Creanga Aug 30 '14 at 21:45
  • 3
    The most practical example why you should be able to do this, is that when clicking the Back button in Firefox, and you have an iframe open that made a history change, the iframe will go back, not the entire page. That's just bull. – Eduard Luca Jan 14 '15 at 10:44
  • 4
    In some cases it is needed. If you were displaying a web view, and had control over browser history, you might wanna disable back button at certain point. Consider a situation in which you are ordering something in web view, if you are not disabling back you might end up in double ordering same thing unnecessarily. – dhruvpatel Dec 30 '15 at 17:12
  • 1
    You are right this is something only bad websites do there is an onbeforeunload event for this. – Filip Cordas May 22 '17 at 12:28
262
history.pushState(null, null, document.title);
window.addEventListener('popstate', function () {
    history.pushState(null, null, document.title);
});

This script will overwrite attempts to navigate back and forth with the state of the current page.


Update:

Some users have reported better success with using document.URL instead of document.title:

history.pushState(null, null, document.URL);
window.addEventListener('popstate', function () {
    history.pushState(null, null, document.URL);
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    Downvoting : as it changes the URL and due to which site crashes on refresh. – Mohan Seth May 30 '16 at 13:50
  • 13
    @Mckenzie the URL is changed because of history.pushState(null, null, document.title); statement. It puts title of the page in the URL and this causes the crash on refresh. You can replace document.title with your page URL. This will solves your issue. Before downvoting please try to understand the code. It's one of the best solutions I found so far. – Arjun Ajith Jun 13 '16 at 10:26
  • 2
    As @ArjunAjith suggest, I replaced document.title with document.url and it is working. +1 for this answer. – Adarsh Khatri Aug 2 '16 at 2:48
  • 2
    To be noted that this doesn't disable long-pressing of the back button. That behaves normally and lets you go back in history. – trss Feb 3 '17 at 21:39
  • 2
    it should be history.pushState(null, document.title, location.href); window.addEventListener('popstate', function (event) { history.pushState(null, document.title, location.href); }); Reference: stackoverflow.com/a/34337617/2073920 – Abdul Rauf Apr 17 '18 at 7:35
24

One cannot disable the browser back button functionality only thing that can be done is prevent them.

Below JavaScript code needs to be placed in the head section of the page where you don’t want the user to revisit using the back button:

<script>
  function preventBack(){window.history.forward();}
  setTimeout("preventBack()", 0);
  window.onunload=function(){null};
</script>

Suppose there are two pages Page1.php and Page2.php and Page1.php redirects to Page2.php.

Hence to prevent user from visiting Page1.php using Back Button you will need to place the above script in the head section of Page1.php.

For more info : Reference

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  • 2
    Reference code not working in Chrome. – CodeFarmer Nov 15 '14 at 5:25
  • Also I couldn't work it in Firefox – ema Jul 3 '15 at 11:44
  • Works for me in Chrome and IE. Thanks! – Dov Miller Aug 20 '17 at 10:46
  • Works for me also in Chrome.. thanks – Suman Das Jun 4 at 5:54
-11

Our approach is simple, but WORKS! :)

When a user clicks our LogOut button, we simply open the login page (or any page) and close the page we are one...simulating opening in new browser window w/ no history to go back to.

<input id="btnLogout" onclick="logOut()" class="btn btn-sm btn-warning" value="Logout" type="button"/>
<script>
    function logOut() {
        window.close = function () { window.open('Default.aspx', '_blank'); };
    }
</script>
| improve this answer | |
  • The browser warns the user that the site is trying to close their page, and they have the option to click cancel...so here we only redirect them if they truly are logging out and leaving the page. – Horizon Consulting Aug 22 '14 at 19:25
  • 1
    use history.pushState() works in all modern browsers which support the HTML5 History API – Shailendra Sharma Sep 4 '14 at 12:26
  • Opening a new window does not have any history for that tab or window and hence this works. but if you want to stay in same window, this is not even close to answering that question. – dhruvpatel Dec 30 '15 at 17:35
  • @dhruvpatel In GNOME’s Epiphany browser, opening new views (tabs/windows) does inherit the history of the parent view. – underscore_d Jan 19 '17 at 9:47

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