7

I have a matrix with 41 rows and 6 columns. This is how the first part looks like.

      X13  X15  X17  X19  X21  X23 
 [1,] "7"  "6"  "5"  "8"  "1"  "8" 
 [2,] "7"  "6"  "5"  "8"  "14" "3" 
 [3,] "7"  "6"  "1"  "3"  "12" "3" 
 [4,] "7"  "6"  "1"  "5"  "6"  "14"
 [5,] "2"  "6"  "1"  "5"  "16" "3" 
 [6,] "2"  "3"  "5"  "5"  "2"  "3" 
 [7,] "7"  "5"  "5"  "17" "7"  "3" 
 [8,] "7"  "2"  "5"  "2"  "2"  "14"
 [9,] "2"  "2"  "10" "10" "2"  "3" 
[10,] "2"  "2"  "10" "5"  "2"  "6" 

My goal is, to compare all the columns with each other, and see, how many of the numbers are equal in the 2 columns. I tried to do it like this:

s <- sum(matrix[,1]==matrix[,2])

But since I need to compare all the possible pairs, it is not effective. It would be good to put this in a loop, but I have no idea how.

And I would like to get my result in a form of a 6x6 similarity matrix. Something like this:

      X13 X15 X17 X19 X21 X23
 X13   0   0   3   2   2   3
 X15   0   0   9  11   4   6
 X17   3   9   0   5   1   3
 X19   2  11   5   0   9  10
 X21   2   4   1   9   0   9
 X23   3   6   3  10   9   0

As you see, I would like to put zeros to the matrix when a column is compared to iteslf.

Since I am a beginner R user, this task semms really complicated to me. I need to use this comparison to 50 matrixes, so I would be glad if you could help me. I would appreciate any tips/suggestions. My english is not so good either, but I hope I could explain my problem well enough. :)

3
6

A non-vectorized, (but perhaps more memory-efficient) way of doing this:

# Fancy way.
similarity.matrix<-apply(matrix,2,function(x)colSums(x==matrix))
diag(similarity.matrix)<-0


# More understandable. But verbose.
similarity.matrix<-matrix(nrow=ncol(matrix),ncol=ncol(matrix))
for(col in 1:ncol(matrix)){
  matches<-matrix[,col]==matrix
  match.counts<-colSums(matches)
  match.counts[col]<-0 # Set the same column comparison to zero.
  similarity.matrix[,col]<-match.counts
}
2
  • My benchmarks show this solution to be slightly faster than Simon's +1 – Tyler Rinker Nov 12 '13 at 17:09
  • Thank you! I think the "fancy way" will totally please my thesis supervisor! :) – Sielu Nov 12 '13 at 20:53
8

Here is an entirely vectorised solution using expand.grid to compute indices and colSums and matrix to wrap up the result.

#  Some reproducible 6x6 sample data
set.seed(1)
m <- matrix( sample(10,36,repl=TRUE) , ncol = 6 )
#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
#[1,]    3   10    7    4    3    5
#[2,]    4    7    4    8    4    6
#[3,]    6    7    8   10    1    5
#[4,]   10    1    5    3    4    2
#[5,]    3    3    8    7    9    9
#[6,]    9    2   10    2    4    7


#  Vector source for column combinations
n <- seq_len( ncol(m) )

#  Make combinations
id <- expand.grid( n , n )

#  Get result
out <- matrix( colSums( m[ , id[,1] ] == m[ , id[,2] ] ) , ncol = length(n) )
diag(out) <- 0
#    [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
#[1,]    0    1    1    0    2    0
#[2,]    1    0    0    1    0    0
#[3,]    1    0    0    0    1    0
#[4,]    0    1    0    0    0    0
#[5,]    2    0    1    0    0    1
#[6,]    0    0    0    0    1    0
0
2

An approach using v_outer from the qdap package:

library(qdapTools) #Using Simon's data

x <- v_outer(m, function(x, y) sum(x==y))
diag(x) <- 0

##    V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6
## V1  0  1  1  0  2  0
## V2  1  0  0  1  0  0
## V3  1  0  0  0  1  0
## V4  0  1  0  0  0  0
## V5  2  0  1  0  0  1
## V6  0  0  0  0  1  0

EDIT I added benchmarks:

set.seed(1)
matrix <- m <- matrix( sample(10,36,repl=TRUE) , ncol = 6 )

MATRIX <- function(){
    n <- seq_len( ncol(m) )
    id <- expand.grid( n , n )
    out <- matrix( colSums( m[ , id[,1] ] == m[ , id[,2] ] ) , ncol = length(n) )
    diag(out) <- 0
    out
}

V_OUTER <- function(){
    x <- v_outer(m, function(x, y) sum(x==y))
    diag(x) <- 0
    x
}

APPLY <- function(){
    similarity.matrix<-apply(matrix,2,function(x)colSums(x==matrix))
    diag(similarity.matrix)<-0
    similarity.matrix
}

library(microbenchmark)
(op <- microbenchmark( 
    MATRIX(),
    V_OUTER(),
    APPLY() ,  
times=1000L))

Unit: microseconds
      expr     min      lq  median      uq      max neval
  MATRIX() 243.980 264.972 277.101 286.898 1719.519  1000
 V_OUTER() 203.861 223.921 234.650 243.280 1579.570  1000
   APPLY()  96.566 108.228 112.893 118.025 1470.409  1000
1
  • Thank you! This is very useful! – Sielu Nov 12 '13 at 20:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.