179

I got a problem with the Passport.js module and Express.js.

This is my code and I just want to use a hardcoded login for the first try.

I always get the message:

I searched a lot and found some posts in stackoverflow but I didnt get the failure.

Error: failed to serialize user into session
    at pass (c:\Development\private\aortmann\bootstrap_blog\node_modules\passport\lib\passport\index.js:275:19)

My code looks like this.

'use strict';

var express = require('express');
var path = require('path');
var fs = require('fs');
var passport = require('passport');
var LocalStrategy = require('passport-local').Strategy;
var nodemailer = require('nodemailer');

var app = express();

module.exports = function setupBlog(mailTransport, database){
var config = JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync('./blog.config'));

app.set('view options', {layout: false});

app.use(express.static(path.join(__dirname, '../', 'resources', 'html')));


app.use(express.bodyParser());
app.use(express.cookieParser());
app.use(express.session({ secret: 'secret' }));
app.use(passport.initialize());
app.use(passport.session());


app.get('/blog/:blogTitle', function(req, res) {
  var blogTitle = req.params.blogTitle;
  if(blogTitle === 'newest'){
    database.getLatestBlogPost(function(post) {
      res.send(post);
    });
  } else {
    database.getBlogPostByTitle(blogTitle, function(blogPost) {
      res.send(blogPost);
    });
  }
});

passport.use(new LocalStrategy(function(username, password, done) {
  // database.login(username, password, done);
  if (username === 'admin' && password === 'admin') {
    console.log('in');
    done(null, { username: username });
  } else {
    done(null, false);
  }
}));

app.post('/login', passport.authenticate('local', {
  successRedirect: '/accessed',
  failureRedirect: '/access'
}));





app.listen(8080);
console.log('Blog is running on port 8080');

}();

Thanks.

361
1

It looks like you didn't implement passport.serializeUser and passport.deserializeUser. Try adding this:

passport.serializeUser(function(user, done) {
  done(null, user);
});

passport.deserializeUser(function(user, done) {
  done(null, user);
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Worked for me. Why do I not have to use the 'id' part as written everywhere else? – schlenger Nov 13 '14 at 16:32
  • 9
    @schlenger it would depend on how you implement serialization. Sometimes you serialize by user id, which means that the serializeUser function stores just the user id in the session, and deserializeUser uses that id to retrieve the user data from a database (for instance). This is to prevent the session storage from containing the actual user data itself. – robertklep Nov 13 '14 at 17:22
  • +1 @robertklep comment. I'd always avoid serializing user information but only id's (for bloat/perf reasons personally). – electblake Jan 22 '16 at 20:03
  • 2
    @robertklep I don't want to store it in session. I am using JWT. Is serializeUser/deserializeUser required? I want a no session. I am using JWT – Internial Oct 30 '17 at 2:54
  • @Internial not sure if you need them, but it would be an easy thing to test. – robertklep Oct 30 '17 at 7:00
44
0

If you decide not to use sessions, you could set the session to false

app.post('/login', passport.authenticate('local', {
  successRedirect: '/accessed',
  failureRedirect: '/access',
  session: false
}));
| improve this answer | |
  • But that won't turn off session on all other endpoints (where I also do not want any session) – jayarjo Aug 14 '19 at 15:20
17
0

Sounds like you missed a part of the passportjs setup, specifically these two methods:

passport.serializeUser(function(user, done) {
    done(null, user._id);
    // if you use Model.id as your idAttribute maybe you'd want
    // done(null, user.id);
});

passport.deserializeUser(function(id, done) {
  User.findById(id, function(err, user) {
    done(err, user);
  });
});

I added the bit about ._id vs. .id but this snippet is from the Configure Section of docs, give that another read and good luck :)

| improve this answer | |
2
0

Here an working but still lazy way to use sessions and still "serialisize" the values.

var user_cache = {};

passport.serializeUser(function(user, next) {
  let id = user._id;
  user_cache[id] = user;
  next(null, id);
});

passport.deserializeUser(function(id, next) {
  next(null, user_cache[id]);
});

in case or weird errors just ask yourself: "Do I rlly set '_id' in my user object?" - in most cases you dont. So use a proper attribute as key.

| improve this answer | |
0
0

Using Promise with serializeUser & deserializeUser:

passport.serializeUser((user, done) => {
  done(null, user.id);
});

passport.deserializeUser((id, done) => {
  // console.log(`id: ${id}`);
  User.findById(id)
    .then((user) => {
      done(null, user);
    })
    .catch((error) => {
      console.log(`Error: ${error}`);
    });
});

Please see my github repo for a full code example how to solve this issue.

| improve this answer | |
-1
0

in passport.use('local-login'...)/ or /('local-singup'...)

if err you have to return "false" err {return done(null, req.flash('megsign', 'Username already exists #!#'));} true {return done(null, false, req.flash('megsign', 'Username already exists #!#'));}

| improve this answer | |

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