287

How can you find the unused NuGet packages in a solution?

I've got a number of solutions where there are a lot of installed packages, and a large number of them are flagged as having updates.

However, I'm concerned there may be breaking changes, so I first want to clean up by removing any unused packages.

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  • 2
    You realize that breaking changes in packages you aren't using wouldn't affect you anyway... As for the question, I just remove all NuGet packages and re-add what the compiler tells me. Commented Jul 30, 2017 at 16:11
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    @OhadSchneider Nope ... but the OCD in me doesn't want all the cruft of the unused packages, e.g. in the deployment
    – SteveC
    Commented Jul 31, 2017 at 8:20
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    @OhadSchneider Doing that can be a problem if you're intentionally not using the latest versions of certain packages.
    – Matthew
    Commented Sep 27, 2020 at 12:35
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    For future readers, VS2022 has this option built-in. Just right-click any project in Solution Explorer and choose Remove Unused References. This is mentioned in an answer below that hasn't received a lot of attention yet.
    – dotNET
    Commented Feb 4, 2022 at 5:28
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    @KWallace, see Frank Rosario's comment in JeeShen Lee's answer. I have VS 2022 with a solution containing projects targeting .NET Framework 4.8, .NET Standard 2.0, and .NET 5.0. "Remove Unused References" is only available for the .NET Standard 2.0 and .NET 5.0 projects. I have to use ReSharper for the .NET Framework projects. Commented Jul 1, 2022 at 19:43

11 Answers 11

85

ReSharper 2016.1 has a feature to remove unused NuGet.

It can be run on a solution and on each project in a solution and it does the following things:

  1. Analyze your code and collecting references to assemblies.
  2. Build NuGet usage graph based on usages of assemblies.
  3. Packages without content files, unused itself and without used dependencies are assumed as unused and suggested to remove.

Unfortunately, this doesn't work for project.json projects (RSRP-454515) and ASP.NET core projects (RSRP-459076)

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    I have 2016.1 and R# is not removing unused nuget references.. I'm using project.json with nuget3 - is that a known issue? Commented Aug 1, 2016 at 12:58
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    @PeterMcEvoy Yes, this is known issue. Thanks for pointing out. I have updated answer to clarify that.
    – ulex
    Commented Aug 1, 2016 at 15:01
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    I must be blind but I'm not seeing any way to actually run this tool Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 20:08
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    @claudekennilol just figured it out. right click the project and there is an option for "Optimize References..." Commented Apr 20, 2017 at 23:14
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    Right click project > Refactor > Remove Unused References > Analyze Used References DOES NOT analyze nuget packages. You must right click project > Optimize references Commented Jun 15, 2018 at 12:52
63

Visual Studio 2019 (version 16.9) has the remove-unused-packages function built-in, we will need to enable it manually now.

Go to Tools > Options > Text Editor > C# > Advanced > (Under the Analysis section) Tick Show "Removed Unused References" command

Visual Studio version 16.10 has the remove unused reference feature available. Right-click on the project > Remove Unused References.

enter image description here

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    I'm not seeing this option, did you have some other option enabled to show you experimental items? I'm using VS Pro 2019, 16.9.3
    – debracey
    Commented Jun 23, 2021 at 20:11
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    @debracey VS version 16.10 has the remove unused reference feature available. Right-click on the project > Remove Unused References. Commented Jul 13, 2021 at 12:49
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    FYI this feature appears to only be available for new csproj files; older projects don't have this option currently. github.com/dotnet/roslyn/issues/54801 Commented Oct 24, 2021 at 18:28
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    This just offers to let me remove any and all packages. It does not say which are not used! Vs2022 Commented Nov 30, 2021 at 21:21
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    Agree with Daniel - just tried it and it removed used references and broke the project... Commented Aug 11, 2022 at 11:40
32

Right-click on the Dotnet core project in visual studio 2019 you will see an option for Remove unused references. enter image description here

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    I don't have this option. Did you need to do anything else to enable it? Commented Sep 20, 2021 at 13:11
  • Try updating the visual studio.
    – Sumesh Es
    Commented Sep 21, 2021 at 5:32
  • I am using the latest version - 16.11.3. Commented Sep 21, 2021 at 6:55
  • I am using the visual studio community edition 16.10.0
    – Sumesh Es
    Commented Sep 23, 2021 at 12:00
  • It says here Dotnet project ? Does this mean you cannot use that function in .NET framework projects or other non dotnet projs @SumeshEs ? Commented Jan 26 at 9:42
29

You can use the Visual Studio Extension ResolveUR - Resolve Unused References.

Resolve unused references including nuget references in Visual Studio 2012/2013/2015 projects via menu item at solution and project nodes Solution Explorer Tool Window

It's not an easy task, so I suggest to make a backup and/or commit before, just in order to rollback if something went wrong.

5
  • This program is too eager when it comes to deleting libraries... Be careful, when using a website, you will notice that a lot of DLLs are necessary but have been gone. If a NuGet package requires another one, you should not delete that one even though YOU don't have a hard dependency on it.
    – jsgoupil
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 5:44
  • I've used this tool with bad results. It's removed (or at least suggested to remove) a lot of things that were actually in use. There have been a few times I've trusted the suggestions and had to spend precious time trying to recover what it's removed. Commented Dec 6, 2017 at 13:29
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    [NOTE] THE description clearly states: The tool is not tested to work with DotNet Web projects(Asp.Net, MVC), Windows CE, Silverlight project types. Use it at your own risk.
    – Korayem
    Commented Jun 30, 2018 at 11:18
  • This tool is really nice! It's smart enough to not remove NUnit.ConsoleRunner etc even though you don't have direct reference to it in your code
    – OlegI
    Commented Nov 20, 2018 at 10:09
  • This tool is slow. I have solution with over 250 projects.. I waited.. and waited.. sigh
    – Piotr Kula
    Commented Mar 20, 2019 at 9:06
22

You can accomplish this using ReSharper 2019.1.1.

Right click on the project > Refactor > Remove Unused References.

If your project is small, you can also use: project > Optimize Used References . . .

A window will pop up. Select all references and remove them all. Then go back and re-add the ones that give you a compiler error.

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    In VS.Net 2019 with Resharper, I found this option under: Solution Explorer > References > Optimize references... Commented Jan 15, 2020 at 10:22
  • "The Optimize References tool window displays assembly references that are both unused and used in the current project, and shows how exactly references are used." blog.jetbrains.com/dotnet/2012/01/03/… Commented Jan 15, 2020 at 14:42
  • In VS.Net 2022 with an ASP.Net core project, select a project in the solution explorer and use the menu option Extensions - Resharper - Find - Optimize references. See also Analyze and optimize project references Commented Mar 18 at 16:06
10

In Visual Studio 2019 starting from the latest versions and Visual Studio 2022 you can remove unused packages as reported in previous comments, but only for SDK style projects. If you try on old projects, like .Net Framework, you won't see this option. As workaround, to verify, you can create two simply console apps: one using .Net Core or later, and one .Net Framework 4.7 or 4.8.


Please refer to: Remove Unused References

9

Below is a little PowerShell script that finds redundant NuGet packages for .NET Core / .NET 5+ projects. For each project file it removes every reference once and checks if it compiles. This will take a lot of time. After this you get a summary of each reference that might be excluded. In the end it is up to you do decide what should be removed. Most likely you will not be able to remove everything it suggest (due dependencies), but it should give you a good starting point.

Save the script below as a ps1-file and replace the string C:\MySolutionDirectory in line 89 with the directory you want to scan on and then run the ps1-file. Do an backup first in case something goes wrong.

function Get-PackageReferences {
    param($FileName, $IncludeReferences, $IncludeChildReferences)

    $xml = [xml] (Get-Content $FileName)

    $references = @()

    if($IncludeReferences) {
        $packageReferences = $xml | Select-Xml -XPath "Project/ItemGroup/PackageReference"

        foreach($node in $packageReferences)
        {
            if($node.Node.Include)
            {
                if($node.Node.Version)
                {
                    $references += [PSCustomObject]@{
                        File = (Split-Path $FileName -Leaf);
                        Name = $node.Node.Include;
                        Version = $node.Node.Version;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    if($IncludeChildReferences)
    {
        $projectReferences = $xml | Select-Xml -XPath "Project/ItemGroup/ProjectReference"

        foreach($node in $projectReferences)
        {
            if($node.Node.Include)
            {
                $childPath = Join-Path -Path (Split-Path $FileName -Parent) -ChildPath $node.Node.Include

                $childPackageReferences = Get-PackageReferences $childPath $true $true

                $references += $childPackageReferences
            }
        }   
    }

    return $references
}

function Get-ProjectReferences {
    param($FileName, $IncludeReferences, $IncludeChildReferences)

    $xml = [xml] (Get-Content $FileName)

    $references = @()

    if($IncludeReferences) {
        $projectReferences = $xml | Select-Xml -XPath "Project/ItemGroup/ProjectReference"

        foreach($node in $projectReferences)
        {
            if($node.Node.Include)
            {
                $references += [PSCustomObject]@{
                    File = (Split-Path $FileName -Leaf);
                    Name = $node.Node.Include;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    if($IncludeChildReferences)
    {
        $projectReferences = $xml | Select-Xml -XPath "Project/ItemGroup/ProjectReference"

        foreach($node in $projectReferences)
        {
            if($node.Node.Include)
            {
                $childPath = Join-Path -Path (Split-Path $FileName -Parent) -ChildPath $node.Node.Include

                $childProjectReferences = Get-ProjectReferences $childPath $true $true

                $references += $childProjectReferences
            }
        }   
    }

    return $references
}

$files = Get-ChildItem -Path C:\MySolutionDirectory -Filter *.csproj -Recurse

Write-Output "Number of projects: $($files.Length)"

$stopWatch = [System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::startNew()

$obseletes = @()

foreach($file in $files) {

    Write-Output ""
    Write-Output "Testing project: $($file.Name)"

    $rawFileContent = [System.IO.File]::ReadAllBytes($file.FullName)

    $childPackageReferences = Get-PackageReferences $file.FullName $false $true
    $childProjectReferences = Get-ProjectReferences $file.FullName $false $true

    $xml = [xml] (Get-Content $file.FullName)

    $packageReferences = $xml | Select-Xml -XPath "Project/ItemGroup/PackageReference"
    $projectReferences = $xml | Select-Xml -XPath "Project/ItemGroup/ProjectReference"

    $nodes = @($packageReferences) + @($projectReferences)

    foreach($node in $nodes)
    {
        $previousNode = $node.Node.PreviousSibling
        $parentNode = $node.Node.ParentNode
        $parentNode.RemoveChild($node.Node) > $null

        if($node.Node.Include)
        {
            $xml.Save($file.FullName)

            if($node.Node.Version)
            {
                $existingChildInclude = $childPackageReferences | Where-Object { $_.Name -eq $node.Node.Include -and $_.Version -eq $node.Node.Version } | Select-Object -First 1

                if($existingChildInclude)
                {
                    Write-Output "$($file.Name) references package $($node.Node.Include) ($($node.Node.Version)) that is also referenced in child project $($existingChildInclude.File)."
                    continue
                }
                else 
                {
                    Write-Host -NoNewline "Building $($file.Name) without package $($node.Node.Include) ($($node.Node.Version))... "
                }
            }
            else
            {
                $existingChildInclude = $childProjectReferences | Where-Object { $_.Name -eq $node.Node.Include } | Select-Object -First 1

                if($existingChildInclude)
                {
                    Write-Output "$($file.Name) references project $($node.Node.Include) that is also referenced in child project $($existingChildInclude.File)."
                    continue
                }
                else 
                {
                    Write-Host -NoNewline "Building $($file.Name) without project $($node.Node.Include)... "
                }
            }
        }
        else 
        {
            continue
        }

        dotnet build $file.FullName > $null

        if($LastExitCode -eq 0)
        {
            Write-Output "Building succeeded."

            if($node.Node.Version)
            {
                $obseletes += [PSCustomObject]@{
                    File = $file;
                    Type = 'Package';
                    Name = $node.Node.Include;
                    Version = $node.Node.Version;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                $obseletes += [PSCustomObject]@{
                    File = $file;
                    Type = 'Project';
                    Name = $node.Node.Include;
                }
            }
        }
        else 
        {
            Write-Output "Building failed."
        }


        if($null -eq $previousNode)
        {
            $parentNode.PrependChild($node.Node) > $null
        } 
        else 
        {
            $parentNode.InsertAfter($node.Node, $previousNode.Node) > $null
        }

        # $xml.OuterXml

        $xml.Save($file.FullName)
    }

    [System.IO.File]::WriteAllBytes($file.FullName, $rawFileContent)

    dotnet build $file.FullName > $null

    if($LastExitCode -ne 0)
    {
        Write-Error "Failed to build $($file.FullName) after project file restore. Was project broken before?"
        return
    }
}

Write-Output ""
Write-Output "-------------------------------------------------------------------------"
Write-Output "Analyse completed in $($stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds) seconds"
Write-Output "$($obseletes.Length) reference(s) could potentially be removed."

$previousFile = $null
foreach($obselete in $obseletes)
{
    if($previousFile -ne $obselete.File)
    {
        Write-Output ""
        Write-Output "Project: $($obselete.File.Name)"
    }

    if($obselete.Type -eq 'Package')
    {
        Write-Output "Package reference: $($obselete.Name) ($($obselete.Version))"
    }
    else
    {
        Write-Output "Project refence: $($obselete.Name)"
    }

    $previousFile = $obselete.File
}

You find more information here: https://devblog.pekspro.com/posts/finding-redundant-project-references

2
  • Very nice script !! Commented Apr 23, 2021 at 9:43
  • seems like this script is to get redundant Nugets, but doesnt detect unused packages
    – juanora
    Commented Oct 26, 2021 at 9:58
2

In JetBrains Rider IDE

  1. Right-click solution or project
  2. "Refactor This"
  3. "Remove Unused References"
  4. Next...

https://www.jetbrains.com/help/rider/Refactorings__Remove_Unused_References.html

This at least shows you which packages are unused, though as of Rider 2023.3.2 it doesn't seem to actually remove anything.

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    Rider is great, but this removes references, not NuGet packages. Commented Jan 9 at 18:10
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    Hmm, seems to half-work on closer inspection. If I add an unused nuget package and then run "remove unused", it does show me the unused nuget pacakge, but the "next" button just closes the dialog and produces no diff 😢 (rider 2023.3.2)
    – Tim Abell
    Commented Jan 10 at 13:45
  • If it shows the package, but suggests/does nothing about it, that seems like an oversight. Fortunately, JetBrains has a good bug reporting system. Commented Jan 10 at 16:16
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1

This is manual labor, but it works.

  1. Use ReSharper or similar code analysis tool to identify any unused references in your projects and uninstall the nuget in the corresponding projects.

  2. Sometimes uninstalled nugets still linger in the Installed packages and Updates lists in the Manage NuGet Packages dialog. Close Visual Studio then delete the packages folder, then reopen the solution and restore your nugets.

1

I don't think there is a default way to find this out. The primary reason being the variety of things these packages can do from referencing an assembly to injecting source code to your project. You may want to check the Nuget.Extensions though. The following thread on codeplex talks about an audit report of nuget packages.

http://nuget.codeplex.com/discussions/429694

(NuGet has been moved from Codeplex to GitHub. Archive of the above link:) https://web.archive.org/web/20171212202557/http://nuget.codeplex.com:80/discussions/429694

0

I would advise you to take care and must see them before removal.

Though option to remove unnecessary references for .net based apps available as mention by Sumesh Es but you should double check them in the dialog and make sure that it do not suggest you to remove necessary project references and dlls which are required by those projects.

In my experience It also removed some necessary dlls as well as project references which were actually required.

So in case your project have project references which require you to add dlls/nuget in your main project as well then this feature might remove those dlls or projects as well.

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