32

In a browser console, entering 1===1 evaluates to true. Entering 1===1===1 evaluates to false.

I assume that this is because of the way the statement is evaluated:

1 === 1 === 1

becomes

(1 === 1) === 1

which evaluates to

true === 1

which is false.

Is this correct? If not, what's the real reason for this behaviour?

  • 5
    Actually the operation is parsed left to right. So 1 === 1 === 1 is evaluated as (1 === 1) === 1, not 1 === (1 === 1). In this case obviously it doesn't make any difference. – Guilherme Sehn Nov 13 '13 at 13:56
  • Thanks - I have updated the answer to reflect this :) – surfitscrollit Nov 13 '13 at 13:59
  • Thanks for all the informative answers. I suspected that this was the reasoning, but it's good to get some confirmation. – surfitscrollit Nov 13 '13 at 14:00
40

Yes, you're exactly right. Here you have two equality checks, which have the same operator precedence. First one evaluates first, then its result applies to the next equality check.

1===1===1is the same as (1===1)===1 which is true===1 which is false, because here you check by values AND their types. 1==1==1 will result in true, because it checks equality by values only, so 1==1==1 equal to (1==1)==1 equal to true==1 equal to true.

20

The === operator doesn't just test equality, but also type equality. Since an integer is not a boolean, true === 1 is false.

Compare:

true == 1; // true
true === 1; // false

Example.

  • 3
    It's true === 1 because the equality operators are left-associative. true === 1 === 1 // false while 1 === 1 === true // true – Tibos Nov 13 '13 at 14:09
  • @Tibos: Correct, though that doesn't change the point of the answer. true == 1 is still true, and true === 1 is still false. – David Nov 13 '13 at 14:14
  • 1
    Yes, the answer's content is entirely accurate, but in relation to the question it is misleading. Thanks for editing! – Tibos Nov 13 '13 at 14:16
3

Correct behaviour. Since

1===1 // value is true

but

true===1 // it's false

There are two reasons for this:

  1. true is a boolean type where 1 is integer
  2. simply, 1 is not equal to true.

so

1===1===1 // false
  • Point 2) depends on the browser implementation. In C for example, there is no 'Boolean', instead ints are used, with 0 as false and anything else as true, so 1 would indeed equal 'true'. Hence 1==true. tl;dr the only difference between 1 and true is the type in some implementations. – 11684 Nov 13 '13 at 21:27
  • @11684 - It does not depend on browser implementation. It depends on correct implementation of the spec. This is JavaScript, not C, and boolean is not numeric (even though according to the spec there can be type coercion if the == operator were being used instead of ===). – Ted Hopp Nov 15 '13 at 3:01
  • In C there is no boolean type and often ints are used as 0 evaluates to false automatically and any other int value to true. JavaScript is mostly interpreted, so such a comparison will be executed by the browser natively. – 11684 Nov 15 '13 at 20:14
2

The behaviour that you mentioned is correct.

Its because === implies matching based on type and value. true === 1 does not match on type, but true == 1 matches based on value.

  • It's true === 1 because the equality operators are left-associative. – Tibos Nov 13 '13 at 14:09
  • Sorry, my bad. I know its left-associative :) – Pratik Nov 13 '13 at 14:10
  • 5
    You could edit your answer to improve it (or delete if you don't think you can add value to a potential future reader). – Tibos Nov 13 '13 at 14:43
-2

if 1==1==1 then it will be true

  • ==will change the arg type and === will not – microbingbing Nov 15 '13 at 2:54

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