383

I am looking for an efficient way to remove all elements from a javascript array if they are present in another array.

// If I have this array:
var myArray = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g'];

// and this one:
var toRemove = ['b', 'c', 'g'];

I want to operate on myArray to leave it in this state: ['a', 'd', 'e', 'f']

With jQuery, I'm using grep() and inArray(), which works well:

myArray = $.grep(myArray, function(value) {
    return $.inArray(value, toRemove) < 0;
});

Is there a pure javascript way to do this without looping and splicing?

3
  • No matter what, it'll always involve looping at some level.
    – Blue Skies
    Nov 13, 2013 at 15:23
  • 1
    If you genuinely want it to be "efficient", you won't use functional type methods like .filter(). Instead you'll use for loops. You can avoid .splice() if the original order doesn't need to be maintained. Or there are ways to make .splice() more efficient if you think there will be many items to remove.
    – Blue Skies
    Nov 13, 2013 at 15:33
  • Nice, your jQuery solution suited me well. Thanks.
    – EPurpl3
    Oct 25, 2019 at 9:23

18 Answers 18

617

Use the Array.filter() method:

myArray = myArray.filter( function( el ) {
  return toRemove.indexOf( el ) < 0;
} );

Small improvement, as browser support for Array.includes() has increased:

myArray = myArray.filter( function( el ) {
  return !toRemove.includes( el );
} );

Next adaptation using arrow functions:

myArray = myArray.filter( ( el ) => !toRemove.includes( el ) );
16
  • 28
    OP: If you're using Underscore.js there's .difference() which basically does this. Nov 13, 2013 at 15:22
  • Just what I was looking for. Thank you. @BillCriswell, I will check out underscore.
    – Tap
    Nov 13, 2013 at 15:25
  • 1
    @AlecRust Convert all elements of toRemove() to upper case and change in the callback from el to el.toUpperCase().
    – Sirko
    Jun 17, 2017 at 17:25
  • 4
    isn't this order n^2? Feb 18, 2019 at 7:01
  • 2
    is there a way to achieve this in order of n ? Mar 20, 2020 at 8:42
72

ECMAScript 6 sets can permit faster computing of the elements of one array that aren't in the other:

const myArray = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g'];
const toRemove = new Set(['b', 'c', 'g']);

const difference = myArray.filter( x => !toRemove.has(x) );

console.log(difference); // ["a", "d", "e", "f"]

Since the lookup complexity for the V8 engine browsers use these days is O(1), the time complexity of the whole algorithm is O(n).

1
  • 3
    This is very very quick compared to using an Array with .includes. For large Arrays (~50,000), it went from about 79 seconds to under 1 second. Thanks for posting. Aug 12, 2021 at 14:45
60
var myArray = [
  {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'}, 
  {name: 'chirag', place: 'bangalore'}, 
  {name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'}, 
  {name: 'chandan', place: 'mumbai'}
];
var toRemove = [
  {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'},
  {name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'}
];



myArray = myArray.filter(ar => !toRemove.find(rm => (rm.name === ar.name && ar.place === rm.place) ))
5
  • Would you mind adding some explanation on such a well received question, please? Apr 29, 2019 at 10:21
  • 1
    I searched hours for solution for the problem and just found it, just awesome. Thank you very much! Sep 1, 2019 at 18:58
  • 1
    You helped me complete my jira in 1 day thanks buddy
    – sam
    May 4, 2021 at 19:54
  • This is useful for array of objects with a unique attribute. +1
    – Qumber
    Nov 17, 2021 at 5:11
  • instead of find() I would use some(), which returns a boolean value instead of the matching item which then has to be asserted to be truthy or falsy to satisfy what filter() expects from its predicate argument.
    – cthulhu
    Feb 16 at 15:50
43

The filter method should do the trick:

const myArray = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g'];
const toRemove = ['b', 'c', 'g'];

// ES5 syntax
const filteredArray = myArray.filter(function(x) { 
  return toRemove.indexOf(x) < 0;
});

If your toRemove array is large, this sort of lookup pattern can be inefficient. It would be more performant to create a map so that lookups are O(1) rather than O(n).

const toRemoveMap = toRemove.reduce(
  function(memo, item) {
    memo[item] = memo[item] || true;
    return memo;
  },
  {} // initialize an empty object
);

const filteredArray = myArray.filter(function (x) {
  return toRemoveMap[x];
});

// or, if you want to use ES6-style arrow syntax:
const toRemoveMap = toRemove.reduce((memo, item) => ({
  ...memo,
  [item]: true
}), {});

const filteredArray = myArray.filter(x => toRemoveMap[x]);
1
  • I really love this answer... I am just going to point in the last line that should return const filteredArray = myArray.filter(x => !toRemoveMap[x]); // instead of toRemoveMap[x] Sep 1, 2020 at 21:32
27

If you are using an array of objects. Then the below code should do the magic, where an object property will be the criteria to remove duplicate items.

In the below example, duplicates have been removed comparing name of each item.

Try this example. http://jsfiddle.net/deepak7641/zLj133rh/

var myArray = [
  {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'}, 
  {name: 'chirag', place: 'bangalore'}, 
  {name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'}, 
  {name: 'chandan', place: 'mumbai'}
];
var toRemove = [
  {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'},
  {name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'}
];

for( var i=myArray.length - 1; i>=0; i--){
 	for( var j=0; j<toRemove.length; j++){
 	    if(myArray[i] && (myArray[i].name === toRemove[j].name)){
    		myArray.splice(i, 1);
    	}
    }
}

alert(JSON.stringify(myArray));

15

Lodash has an utility function for this as well: https://lodash.com/docs#difference

13

How about the simplest possible:

var myArray = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g'];
var toRemove = ['b', 'c', 'g'];

var myArray = myArray.filter((item) => !toRemove.includes(item));
console.log(myArray)

1
  • 2
    Keep in mind that includes is not available before ES7.
    – Greg
    Aug 20, 2019 at 18:18
10

I just implemented as:

Array.prototype.exclude = function(list){
        return this.filter(function(el){return list.indexOf(el)<0;})
}

Use as:

myArray.exclude(toRemove);
1
  • 2
    It is not good practice to extend prototypes of native Objects, such Array. That can have a long term conflict with future development of the language ( see the flatten case )
    – MarcoL
    Mar 13, 2018 at 9:22
7

If you cannot use new ES5 stuff such filter I think you're stuck with two loops:

for( var i =myArray.length - 1; i>=0; i--){
  for( var j=0; j<toRemove.length; j++){
    if(myArray[i] === toRemove[j]){
      myArray.splice(i, 1);
    }
  }
}
2
  • filter isn't "new HTML5 stuff" Oct 11, 2016 at 0:11
  • I should have written "ES5 stuff". It wasn't available with ES3
    – MarcoL
    Oct 11, 2016 at 5:54
7

You can use _.differenceBy from lodash

const myArray = [
  {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'}, 
  {name: 'chirag', place: 'bangalore'}, 
  {name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'}, 
  {name: 'chandan', place: 'mumbai'}
];
const toRemove = [
  {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'},
  {name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'}
];
const sorted = _.differenceBy(myArray, toRemove, 'name');

Example code here: CodePen

1
  • 1
    What if the attribute is nested inside the object? Something test like in your case {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore' , nested : { test : 1}} Mar 29, 2020 at 7:03
5

Now in one-liner flavor:

console.log(['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g'].filter(x => !~['b', 'c', 'g'].indexOf(x)))

Might not work on old browsers.

3

This is pretty late but adding this to explain what @mojtaba roohi has answered. The first block of code will not work as each array is having a different object, i.e. df[0] != nfl[2]. Both objects look similar but are altogether different, which is not the case when we use primitive types like numbers.

let df = [ {'name': 'C' },{'name': 'D' }] 
let nfl = [ {'name': 'A' },{'name': 'B' },{'name': 'C' },{'name': 'D' }] 
let res = nfl.filter(x => df.indexOf(x)<0)
console.log(res)

Here is the working code:

let df = [{'name': 'C' },{'name': 'D' }]
let nfl = [ {'name': 'A' },{'name': 'B' },{'name': 'C' },{'name': 'D' }];
let res = nfl.filter((o1) => !df.some((o2) => o1.name === o2.name));
console.log(res)

0
1

If you're using Typescript and want to match on a single property value, this should work based on Craciun Ciprian's answer above.

You could also make this more generic by allowing non-object matching and / or multi-property value matching.

/**
 *
 * @param arr1 The initial array
 * @param arr2 The array to remove
 * @param propertyName the key of the object to match on
 */
function differenceByPropVal<T>(arr1: T[], arr2: T[], propertyName: string): T[] {
  return arr1.filter(
    (a: T): boolean =>
      !arr2.find((b: T): boolean => b[propertyName] === a[propertyName])
  );
}
0

Proper way to remove all elements contained in another array is to make source array same object by remove only elements:

Array.prototype.removeContained = function(array) {
  var i, results;
  i = this.length;
  results = [];
  while (i--) {
    if (array.indexOf(this[i]) !== -1) {
      results.push(this.splice(i, 1));
    }
  }
  return results;
};

Or CoffeeScript equivalent:

Array.prototype.removeContained = (array) ->
  i = @length
  @splice i, 1 while i-- when array.indexOf(@[i]) isnt -1

Testing inside chrome dev tools:

19:33:04.447 a=1
19:33:06.354 b=2
19:33:07.615 c=3
19:33:09.981 arr = [a,b,c]
19:33:16.460 arr1 = arr

19:33:20.317 arr1 === arr
19:33:20.331 true

19:33:43.592 arr.removeContained([a,c])
19:33:52.433 arr === arr1
19:33:52.438 true

Using Angular framework is the best way to keep pointer to source object when you update collections without large amount of watchers and reloads.

1
  • This answer is bad as it voids best practices. Specifically, never modifying objects you don't own. In this case, you're modifying the Array object, which is a big no-no. Jul 14, 2019 at 9:54
0

I build the logic without using any built-in methods, please let me know any optimization or modifications. I tested in JS editor it is working fine.

var myArray = [
            {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'},
            {name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'},
            {name: 'chirag', place: 'bangalore'},
            {name: 'chandan', place: 'mumbai'},

        ];
        var toRemove = [

            {name: 'chirag', place: 'bangalore'},
            {name: 'deepak', place: 'bangalore'},
            /*{name: 'chandan', place: 'mumbai'},*/
            /*{name: 'alok', place: 'berhampur'},*/


        ];
        var tempArr = [];
        for( var i=0 ; i < myArray.length; i++){
            for( var j=0; j<toRemove.length; j++){
                var toRemoveObj = toRemove[j];
                if(myArray[i] && (myArray[i].name === toRemove[j].name)) {
                    break;
                }else if(myArray[i] && (myArray[i].name !== toRemove[j].name)){
                        var fnd = isExists(tempArr,myArray[i]);
                        if(!fnd){
                            var idx = getIdex(toRemove,myArray[i])
                            if (idx === -1){
                                tempArr.push(myArray[i]);
                            }

                        }

                    }

                }
        }
        function isExists(source,item){
            var isFound = false;
            for( var i=0 ; i < source.length; i++){
                var obj = source[i];
                if(item && obj && obj.name === item.name){
                    isFound = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
            return isFound;
        }
        function getIdex(toRemove,item){
            var idex = -1;
            for( var i=0 ; i < toRemove.length; i++){
                var rObj =toRemove[i];
                if(rObj && item && rObj.name === item.name){
                    idex=i;
                    break;
                }
            }
            return idex;
        }
0

//Using the new ES6 Syntax

    console.log(["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g"].filter(el => !["b", "c", "g"].includes(el)));

    // OR

    // Main array
    let myArray = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g"];

    // Array to remove
    const toRemove = ["b", "c", "g"];

    const diff = () => (myArray = myArray.filter((el) => !toRemove.includes(el)));
  console.log(diff()); // [ 'a', 'd', 'e', 'f' ]

    // OR

    const diff2 = () => {
      return myArray = myArray.filter((el) => !toRemove.includes(el));
    };
    console.log(diff2()); // [ 'a', 'd', 'e', 'f' ]

0

A High performance and immutable solution

Javascript

const excludeFromArr = (arr, exclude) => {
  const excludeMap = exclude.reduce((all, item) => ({ ...all, [item]: true }), {});
  return arr.filter((item) => !excludeMap?.[item]);
};

Typescript:

const excludeFromArr = (arr: string[], exclude: string[]): string[] => {
  const excludeMap = exclude.reduce<Record<string, boolean>>((all, item) => ({ ...all, [item]: true }), {});
  return arr.filter((item) => !excludeMap?.[item]);
};
-1
const first = [
  { key: "Value #1", key1: "Value #11" },
  { key: "Value #2", key1: "Value #12" },
  { key: "Value #3", key1: "Value #13" },
];

const second = [{ key: "Value #1", key1: "Value #11" }];

const toRemove = second.map((x) => Object.values(x).join("."));

const remainingData = first.filter( (x) => !toRemove.includes(Object.values(x).join(".")) );

console.log(JSON.stringify(remainingData, null, 2));

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.