17

I have an array [1,2,4,5,4,7] and I want to find the frequency of each number and store it in a hash. I have this code, but it returns NoMethodError: undefined method '+' for nil:NilClass

def score( array )
  hash = {}
  array.each{|key| hash[key] += 1}
end

Desired output is

{1 => 1, 2 => 1, 4 => 2, 5 => 1, 7 => 1 }
4
  • 3
    mr, some suggest using inject (aka reduce), which is fine, but all you have to do is change hash = {} to hash = Hash.new(0). That tells Ruby that if it encounters hash[key] in a context where it must have a value (such as hash[key] += 1 or v = hash[key]) and the hash does not contain the key key, it is to add key=>0 to the hash before taking further action (such as hash[key] += 1). On the other hand, if hash[key] == 7 will evaluate to if nil == 7 if key is not in the hash; key=>0 will not be added to the hash. Nov 13, 2013 at 20:45
  • @CarySwoveland Nice teaching...!! Liked it.. +1. Nov 13, 2013 at 20:47
  • 2
    @tokland, the problem may be the same, but not the question. Here, mr. wants to know why he got a particular error, which seems to me quite ligit. Nov 13, 2013 at 21:49
  • fair enough, then let's say it's related :) stackoverflow.com/questions/9480852/array-to-hash-words-count
    – tokland
    Nov 13, 2013 at 22:08

8 Answers 8

25

In Ruby 2.4+:

def score(array)
  array.group_by(&:itself).transform_values!(&:size)
end
23

Do as below :

def score( array )
  hash = Hash.new(0)
  array.each{|key| hash[key] += 1}
  hash
end
score([1,2,4,5,4,7]) # => {1=>1, 2=>1, 4=>2, 5=>1, 7=>1}

Or more Rubyish using Enumerable#each_with_object:

def score( array )
  array.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)){|key,hash| hash[key] += 1}
end
score([1,2,4,5,4,7]) # => {1=>1, 2=>1, 4=>2, 5=>1, 7=>1}

The reason of why NoMethodError: undefined method '+' for nil:NilClass ?

hash = {} is an empty has,with default value as nil.nil is an instance of Nilclass,and NilClass doesn't have any instance method called #+. So you got NoMethodError.

Look at the Hash::new documentation :

new → new_hash
new(obj) → new_hash

Returns a new, empty hash. If this hash is subsequently accessed by a key that doesn’t correspond to a hash entry, the value returned depends on the style of new used to create the hash. In the first form, the access returns nil. If obj is specified, this single object will be used for all default values. If a block is specified, it will be called with the hash object and the key, and should return the default value. It is the block’s responsibility to store the value in the hash if required.

0
19

Ruby 2.7 onwards will have the Enumerable#tally method that will solve this.

From the trunk documentation:

Tallys the collection. Returns a hash where the keys are the elements and the values are numbers of elements in the collection that correspond to the key.

["a", "b", "c", "b"].tally #=> {"a"=>1, "b"=>2, "c"=>1}
13

Just use inject. This type of application is exactly what it is meant for. Something like:

a.inject(Hash.new(0)) {|hash,word| hash[word] += 1; hash }
2

Love me some inject:

results = array.inject(Hash.new(0)) {|hash, arr_element| hash[arr_element] += 1; hash }

1.9.3p448 :082 > array = [1,2,4,5,4,7]
 => [1, 2, 4, 5, 4, 7] 
1.9.3p448 :083 > results = array.inject(Hash.new(0)) {|hash, arr_element| hash[arr_element] += 1; hash }
 => {1=>1, 2=>1, 4=>2, 5=>1, 7=>1} 
3
  • 4
    That would (IMO) be cleaner with each_with_object: a.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) { |e, h| h[e] += 1 } Nov 13, 2013 at 20:41
  • 1
    To each their own, @muistooshort :)
    – CDub
    Nov 13, 2013 at 20:43
  • 3
    I tend to use inject for "iterate with feedback" situations and each_with_object for "iterate and collect" situations. I got tired of the ; hash stuff. Nov 13, 2013 at 21:08
2

Here is a short option that uses the Hash array initializer

Hash[arr.uniq.map {|v| [v, arr.count(v)] }]
0
1

The point here is that hash[1] doesn't exist (nil) when it first sees 1 in the array.

You need to initialize it somehow, and hash = Hash.new(0) is the easiest way. 0 is the initial value you want in this case.

0

Or use the group by method:

arr = [1,2,4,5,4,7]

Hash[arr.group_by{|x|x}.map{|num,arr| [num, arr.size] }]

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