84

A dot . in a regular expression matches any single character. In order for regex to match a dot, the dot has to be escaped: \.

It has been pointed out to me that inside square brackets [] a dot does not have to be escaped. For example, the expression: [.]{3} would match ... string.

Doesn't it, really? And if so, is it true for all regex standards?

  • Yes that is true that DOT (and most other special characters) don't need to be escaped in character class. – anubhava Nov 14 '13 at 11:05
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    There is no "standard" for regular expression syntax. – BoltClock Nov 14 '13 at 11:06
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    @BoltClock there are some: posix, posix extended, perl. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression#Standards – Dariusz Nov 14 '13 at 12:31
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    @Dariusz were you the one who down voted me because you thought I was wrong? if so, I want my 2 points back :) – Paul Samsotha Nov 14 '13 at 12:58
  • @peeskillet yes I was, I stand corrected. Thx and sorry. – Dariusz Nov 14 '13 at 13:07
115

In a character class (square brackets) any character except ^, -, ] or \ is a literal.

This website is a brilliant reference and has lots of info on the nuances of different regex flavours. http://www.regular-expressions.info/refcharclass.html

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    It really depends on how the language handles it, but for most languages this is true. – Patrick Oscity Nov 14 '13 at 11:26
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    - is also literal if it's the last value – Pedro Lobito May 10 '16 at 12:38
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    And ^ is literal if it's not the first character – Nigel B. Peck Dec 17 '16 at 2:52
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    If $ looks like a variable, it also needs to be escaped. E.g.: [$.] – W3Coder Mar 31 '17 at 13:55
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    @PedroLobito And if it's the first, I think – Tim Malone Aug 7 '18 at 12:05

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