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So i have been going through our code base and I have seen some our DTO's have a mix and match of [DataMember] and [IgnoreDataMember] attributes.

IN the past, we have been told that if we do not want something in the DTO serialised, simply do not add the [DataMember] attribute. Then I saw the other attribute and did some digging and it seems that this explicitly states that the property will not be serialised.

Now my question is, which is better? Adding [IgnoreDataMember] or not adding anything.

I have asked around and it seems that [IgnoreDataMember] is from the days when everything was serialised and you had to dictate what should be ignored (I believe in .Net 2). Then they changed it to the reverse and you had to explicitly state what SHOULD be serialised. Now it seems that you can do both.

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I have asked around and it seems that [IgnoreDataMember] is from the days when everything was serialised and you had to dictate what should be ignored (I believe in .Net 2). Then they changed it to the reverse and you had to explicitly state what SHOULD be serialised.

Actually that's not quite true; IIRC it has always been both:

  • if it is marked as [DataContract], then only the members marked [DataMember] are considered
  • if it is not marked as [DataContract], then it defaults to everything, but you can subtract members using [IgnoreDataMember]

I usually just omit the [DataMember] of things that I don't want serialized, but in many ways [IgnoreDataMember] is more explicit - mainly for the benefit of the maintainer. It says "I am intentionally not serializing this", rather than "maybe I know that this isn't being serialized, but maybe I just forgot to add the attribute".

Either will work.

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    also, according to MS: "The IgnoreDataMemberAttribute attribute is only honored when used with unmarked types."; if you use [DataContract] and [IgnoreDataMember] on the same class, the latter is ignored. – Michael Edenfield Nov 14 '13 at 11:39
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    @MichaelEdenfield to be pedantic, DataContractSerializer defaults to all public fields and properties (public fields are very rare); and even that is a little ambiguous. For example, if we are talking about NetDataContractSerializer, then it defaults to all fields (public and private), but no properties – Marc Gravell Nov 14 '13 at 11:52
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    I know it's an old thread, but I encountered an issue yesterday that indicates that what Mr. Edenfield said is not exactly so. I have a class with one field, and 4 properties. All 4 properties convert some form of data (byte array, string or others, for example) and write it to the one field. I marked the class with a DataContract attribute and marked only the field as a DataMember. However, this way the deserializer did NOT ignore the properties, but set them to the default value(which would overwrite the field).Adding [IgnoreDataMember] to the properties fixed the issue. So it's not ignored – Cedric Mamo Jul 4 '14 at 8:21

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