Java 8 introduces default methods to provide the ability to extend interfaces without the need to modify existing implementations.

I wonder if it's possible to explicitly invoke the default implementation of a method when that method has been overridden or is not available because of conflicting default implementations in different interfaces.

interface A {
    default void foo() {
        System.out.println("A.foo");
    }
}

class B implements A {
    @Override
    public void foo() {
        System.out.println("B.foo");
    }
    public void afoo() {
        // how to invoke A.foo() here?
    }
}

Considering the code above, how would you call A.foo() from a method of class B?

  • Can you tell me why you have implementation to your foo() method inside you interface A ??. – Maciej Cygan Nov 14 '13 at 11:40
  • 16
    @MaciejCygan It's allowed in Java 8 – Rohit Jain Nov 14 '13 at 11:41
up vote 207 down vote accepted

As per this article you access default method in interface A using

A.super.foo();

This could be used as follows (assuming interfaces A and C both have default methods foo())

public class ChildClass implements A, C {
    @Override    
    public void foo() {
       //you could completely override the default implementations
       doSomethingElse();
       //or manage conflicts between the same method foo() in both A and C
       A.super.foo();
    }
    public void bah() {
       A.super.foo(); //original foo() from A accessed
       C.super.foo(); //original foo() from C accessed
    }
}

A and C can both have .foo() methods and the specific default implementation can be chosen or you can use one (or both) as part of your new foo() method. You can also use the same syntax to access the default versions in other methods in your implementing class.

Formal description of the method invocation syntax can be found in the chapter 15 of the JLS.

  • 11
    Also note that if A extends SomeOtherInterface, and SomeOtherInterface has default Type method(), then you can't just call SomeOtherInterface.super.method() from ChildClass. You can only call default methods of interfaces enumerated in the ChildClass's implements clause, not their parent interfaces' methods. – gvlasov May 25 '15 at 11:15
  • 1
    @Suseika good point, the same as there is no super.super.someMethod(); (because that would be horrible) – Richard Tingle May 25 '15 at 11:18
  • @gvlasov good point , but how to access a parent interface's default method from a child interface , is it possible ?? Update.......... Yes Possible , the more concrete explanation here stackoverflow.com/a/24280376/3791156 – Raaghu Jan 2 at 10:30

The code below should work.

public class B implements A {
    @Override
    public void foo() {
        System.out.println("B.foo");
    }

    void aFoo() {
        A.super.foo();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        B b = new B();
        b.foo();
        b.aFoo();
    }
}

interface A {
    default void foo() {
        System.out.println("A.foo");
    }
}

Output:

B.foo
A.foo

You don't need to override the default method of an interface. Just call it like the following:

public class B implements A {

    @Override
    public void foo() {
        System.out.println("B.foo");
    }

    public void afoo() {
        A.super.foo();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
       B b=new B();
       b.afoo();
    }
}

Output:

A.foo

  • 7
    OP says: "[is it] possible to explicitly invoke the default implementation of a method when that method has been overridden" – dasblinkenlight Nov 14 '13 at 11:36

This answer is written mainly for users who are coming from question 45047550 which is closed.

Java 8 interfaces introduce some aspects of multiple inheritance. Default methods has an implemented function body. To call a method from the super class you can use the keyword super, but if you want to make this with a super interface it's required to name it explicitly.

class Clazz {

    public void foo() {
        System.out.println("Hello Clazz!");
    }

}

interface Interface111 {

    default public void foo() {
        System.out.println("Hello Interface111!");
    }

}

interface Interface222 {

    default public void foo() {
        System.out.println("Hello Interface222!");
    }

}

public class Example extends Clazz implements Interface111, Interface222 {

    public void foo() {
        super.foo(); // (note: Clazz.super is wrong!)
        Interface111.super.foo();
        Interface222.super.foo();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Example().foo();
    }

}

Output:

Hello Clazz!
Hello Interface111!
Hello Interface222!

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