3

I have an app that relies heavily on WebViews. After the KitKat update, users are reporting that the app no longer reflows text after zooming in or out. I've looked into the documentation and saw that a lot has changed, but while it talks a lot about zooming and scaling, nothing there mentions anything about text reflow. It seems that once the viewport is set, zooming is a pan-and-zoom thing and there's no longer an option to have text reflow after zooming. Is there ANY solution to this?

10

The KitKat Chromium WebView doesn't reflow text. If you're concerned about text legibility please see the "NARROW_COLUMNS and SINGLE_COLUMN no longer supported" section in the migration guide where the suggested solution is to use text autosizing.

If you really want to bring this effect back then you'd need to do something like this:

  1. Put all of your content in a <div id="contentRoot"> </div>
  2. Implement onScaleChanged

    class MyWebViewClient extends WebViewClient {
        boolean scaleChangedRunnablePending = false;
    
        // Other code here
    
        @Override
        void onScaleChanged(final WebView webView, fload oldScale, float newScale) {
            if (scaleChangedRunnablePending) return;
            view.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    webView.evaluateJavaScript("recalculateWidth();", null);
                    scaleChangedRunnablePending = false;
                }
            }, 100);
        }
    }
    
    // Don't forget to webView.setWebViewClient(new MyWebViewClient());
    
  3. Use the following JavaScript

    function recalculateWidth() {
        $("#contentRoot").width(window.innerWidth);
    }
    

    or, alternatively you could try modifying the viewport meta tag.

The above should perform the reflow with a slight delay (which is there to keep the number of unnecessary re-layouts down to a minimum).

  • 3
    @EladAvron I just tried it out real quick and it works fine for me document.getElementById('contentRoot').style.width = window.innerWidth; is the exact JS I used and I invoked the JS directly from onScaleChanged. Maybe use DevTools to see if the JavaScript is being called? – marcin.kosiba Nov 15 '13 at 15:36
  • Thanks, I'll try it again and see it it works. Worse case scenario, I got something similar to work by viewport.setAttribute('content', 'width=device-width, initial-scale=' + newScale + '); based on your idea to use onScaelChanged, I'm gonna try both methods and see what I can get working. – Elad Avron Nov 15 '13 at 15:41
  • Well, what do you know - it worked now! No idea what I did wrong earlier, but it was obviously something stupid. :-P Also, future tip to anyone else considering using viewport scaling - don't, because then it'll both zoom AND scale the viewport getting you an extra-big and unreversible viewport. Unless you use external controls, in which case, go nuts. – Elad Avron Nov 15 '13 at 15:49
  • Ok, hate to resurrect this thread - but that caused a really weird issue. If the page has a pre-set zoom, and is then rotated twice (meaning from landscape to portrait and back or vice verce), it'll go back to the default scale, and then gradually scale itself back over the course of about a minute. It's really really weird. – Elad Avron Jan 6 '14 at 11:38
  • 1
    @EladAvron ah... that may be caused by some rounding issues. If changing the content width results in changing the scale you'll get the effect you described. The simplest fix would be to have the JavaScript not alter the content width if the value window.innerWidth is within 5% of the content width. – marcin.kosiba Jan 9 '14 at 13:55
5

Thanks, everyone, for this great thread!! I want to add my 2cents. There is no need to add extra div with id='contentRoot' in the HTML file. You can use body tag which must already exist in any html. Also, as EladAvron wrote, JS code can be directly called from Java. All in all, the original answer that marcin.kosiba has posted is applicable to HTML which you don't have a right to modify.

The call to JS that worked for me is:

webview.loadUrl("javascript:document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].style.width=window.innerWidth+'px';");

I don't know why, but adding 'px' was crucial for me.

  • it does leave lot of extra space in the extreme right and also the window.innerWidth decreases as we zoom in – Aashish Bhatnagar Jun 17 '15 at 12:23
1

Thanks for these hints - combining them, I found the following workaround not needing Java:

var innerWidth = 0;
var text_reflow = function () {
  if (window.innerWidth != innerWidth) {
    innerWidth = window.innerWidth;
    document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].style.width = innerWidth+'px';
  }
};
text_reflow();
setInterval(text_reflow, 500);

Instead of using the polling interval, one could do, e.g., also

window.onresize = text_reflow;
addListener(window, 'touchstart', function (e) { text_reflow(); });

Unfortunately, it seems that actual pinch-to-zoom events cannot be caught.

1

This is an old thread, but I just wanted to add the solution I'm using, in case someone might benefit from it. I experienced the weird scaling problem on certain pages when zoomed all the way out, and unfortunately, it's difficult to detect in JavaScript if the page is zoomed all the way out. The solution to this is to detect whether the scale change is large enough before resizing the page.

The following solution works on KitKat and Lollipop and doesn't have the annoying gradual zoom out that I was seeing on some websites.

class MyWebViewClient extends WebViewClient {
    private boolean mIsRunning = false;
    private float mZoomScale = 0.0f;
    private static final String REFLOW_TEXT = "javascript:document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].style.width=window.innerWidth+'px';"

    @Override
    public void onScaleChanged(final WebView view, final float oldScale, final float newScale) {
        if (view.isShown() && Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.KITKAT) {
            if (mIsRunning)    // Don't run if there's a resize runnable in the queue
                return;
            if (Math.abs(mZoomScale - newScale) > 0.01f) {    // This stops the gradual zoom
                mIsRunning = view.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        mZoomScale = newScale;
                        view.evaluateJavascript(REFLOW_TEXT, null);
                        mIsRunning = false;
                    }
                }, 100);
            }
        }
    }
}

Thanks to marcin.kosiba and user3185518, whose solutions I combined and modified to build this answer.

  • why does it leave extra space on right of the webview – Aashish Bhatnagar Jun 8 '15 at 13:22
  • What part does only run on versions above Kitkat? – nilsi Aug 28 '15 at 6:55
  • @nilsi below KitKat, the WebView supports text scaling natively, so ideally you wouldn't want to use this hack on versions below it. – anthonycr Aug 28 '15 at 15:38
  • Don't forget to enable Javascript on the WebView. – dazed Jan 13 '16 at 18:30
  • This didn't work on my Nexus 5x, the gradual zoom kicked in so I increased the threshold and compare the change in percentage: float changeInPercent = Math.abs(100 - 100 / mZoomScale * newScale); if (changeInPercent > 2.5) ... – Emanuel Moecklin Jul 27 '16 at 18:54
0

This code will make sure to solve your problem 100% The problem with the KitKat Comes in the form of fine head

<meta name="viewport" content="maximum-scale=0"> java> view.evaluateJavascript("document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild('<meta name=\"viewport\" content=\"maximum-scale=0\">');", null);

webView.setWebViewClient(new WebViewClient() {
            boolean scaleChangedRunnablePending = false;
            @Override
            public void onScaleChanged(final WebView view, float oldScale, float newScale) {
                super.onScaleChanged(view, oldScale, newScale);
                if (scaleChangedRunnablePending) return;
                view.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        view.evaluateJavascript("document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild('<meta name=\"viewport\" content=\"maximum-scale=0\">');", null);
                        scaleChangedRunnablePending = false;
                    }
                }, 100);
            }
  • This answer seems to be based on setting maximum-scale=0 with the aim of disabling zoom altogether. I think the OP still wanted zoom to be enabled, but to reflow. – Silas S. Brown Jul 31 at 14:39
0

The answers that use window.innerWidth from Javascript should work on Android 4.4 (which uses Chrome 33 for WebViews), but won't work on some newer versions of Android. This is because Chrome 48 and Chrome 61+ leave window.innerWidth unchanged when you zoom (see Chrome issue 571297), which affects all Android 9 devices and some Android 5 through 8 devices depending on which updates to Android System WebView the user has accepted.

The replacement on Chrome 61+ is Visual Viewport API which provides window.visualViewport.width, so the answers using window.innerWidth should now be updated to use (window.visualViewport!=undefined?window.visualViewport.width:window.innerWidth) for maximum compatibility.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.