20

Resharper is telling me that the 'else' in this code is redundant:

if(a)
{
   //Do Something
}
else if(b)
{
   //Do Something
}

The else does not seem redundant because the else keeps b from being evaluated if a is true. The extra overhead is small if b is a variable, but b could also be an expression.

Is this correct?

  • Could you elaborate a bit on the contents of the conditions and statements used in the "somethings"... people are guesstimating answers here. – Roman Gruber Nov 14 '13 at 23:40
37

It's redundant if you have a some sort of break, continue, return, or throw statement (or even a goto) inside the first if-block that always causes execution to branch outside the current block:

if(a)
{
    return 0;
}
else if(b)
{
    return 1;
}

In this case, if the code enters the first block, there's no way it will enter the second block, so it's equivalent to:

if(a)
{
    return 0;
}
if(b)
{
    return 1;
}
  • 3
    I think I would rather be consistent and have a little redundancy to make sure I implement efficient else/if statements everywhere else. Plus if you change the code to remove the first return, then the else would hold up, which is probably what you want – Coops Jan 13 '15 at 13:43
5

You are right in this case, but this is the reason I think they had it to begin with:

Certain if-else conditions can have their else clause removed. Consider the following method:

public int Sign(double d)
{
    if (d > 0.0)
        return 1;
    else
        return -1;
}

In the above, the else statement can be safely removed because its if clause returns from the method. Thus, even without the else, there’s no way you’ll be able to proceed past the if clause body.

0

It doesn't appear redundant to me. Removing the else would result in different program flow if both a and b are true.

  • 2
    Yes, the code will operate different when you use two constructs if and if after eachother compared to if and else if. In the first case, the code will execute in one branch, in the second case - the code will execute in two branches. But the Resharper rule is raised when there is a construct in the first if that makes the use of else in the second if unecessary. Such as return, break or similar. – Tore Aurstad Oct 8 '14 at 11:30

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