I have a pandas data frame and I would like to able to predict the values of column A from the values in columns B and C. Here is a toy example:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [10,20,30,40,50], 
                   "B": [20, 30, 10, 40, 50], 
                   "C": [32, 234, 23, 23, 42523]})

Ideally, I would have something like ols(A ~ B + C, data = df) but when I look at the examples from algorithm libraries like scikit-learn it appears to feed the data to the model with a list of rows instead of columns. This would require me to reformat the data into lists inside lists, which seems to defeat the purpose of using pandas in the first place. What is the most pythonic way to run an OLS regression (or any machine learning algorithm more generally) on data in a pandas data frame?

I think you can almost do exactly what you thought would be ideal, using the statsmodels package which was one of pandas' optional dependencies before pandas' version 0.20.0 (it was used for a few things in pandas.stats.)

>>> import pandas as pd
>>> import statsmodels.formula.api as sm
>>> df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [10,20,30,40,50], "B": [20, 30, 10, 40, 50], "C": [32, 234, 23, 23, 42523]})
>>> result = sm.ols(formula="A ~ B + C", data=df).fit()
>>> print result.params
Intercept    14.952480
B             0.401182
C             0.000352
dtype: float64
>>> print result.summary()
                            OLS Regression Results                            
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:                      A   R-squared:                       0.579
Model:                            OLS   Adj. R-squared:                  0.158
Method:                 Least Squares   F-statistic:                     1.375
Date:                Thu, 14 Nov 2013   Prob (F-statistic):              0.421
Time:                        20:04:30   Log-Likelihood:                -18.178
No. Observations:                   5   AIC:                             42.36
Df Residuals:                       2   BIC:                             41.19
Df Model:                           2                                         
==============================================================================
                 coef    std err          t      P>|t|      [95.0% Conf. Int.]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intercept     14.9525     17.764      0.842      0.489       -61.481    91.386
B              0.4012      0.650      0.617      0.600        -2.394     3.197
C              0.0004      0.001      0.650      0.583        -0.002     0.003
==============================================================================
Omnibus:                          nan   Durbin-Watson:                   1.061
Prob(Omnibus):                    nan   Jarque-Bera (JB):                0.498
Skew:                          -0.123   Prob(JB):                        0.780
Kurtosis:                       1.474   Cond. No.                     5.21e+04
==============================================================================

Warnings:
[1] The condition number is large, 5.21e+04. This might indicate that there are
strong multicollinearity or other numerical problems.
  • 2
    Note that correct keyword is formula, I accidentally typed formulas instead and got weird error: TypeError: from_formula() takes at least 3 arguments (2 given) – denfromufa Nov 14 '16 at 18:19
  • @DSM Very new to python. Tried running your same code and got errors on both print messages: print result.summary() ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax >>> print result.parmas File "<stdin>", line 1 print result.parmas ^ SyntaxError: Missing parentheses in call to 'print'...Maybe I loaded packages wrong?? It appears to work when I don't put "print". Thanks. – a.powell Apr 1 '17 at 0:45
  • 2
    @a.powell The OP's code is for Python 2. The only change I think you need to make is to put parentheses round the arguments to print: print(result.params) and print(result.summary()) – Paul Moore Apr 7 '17 at 14:35
  • I would appreciate if you could have a look at this and thank you: stackoverflow.com/questions/44923808/… – Desta Haileselassie Hagos Jul 5 '17 at 16:10
  • attempting to use this formula() approach throws the type error TypeError: __init__() missing 1 required positional argument: 'endog', so i guess it's deprecated. also, ols is now OLS – Mike Palmice May 18 at 18:50

Note: pandas.stats has been removed with 0.20.0


It's possible to do this with pandas.stats.ols:

>>> from pandas.stats.api import ols
>>> df = pd.DataFrame({"A": [10,20,30,40,50], "B": [20, 30, 10, 40, 50], "C": [32, 234, 23, 23, 42523]})
>>> res = ols(y=df['A'], x=df[['B','C']])
>>> res
-------------------------Summary of Regression Analysis-------------------------

Formula: Y ~ <B> + <C> + <intercept>

Number of Observations:         5
Number of Degrees of Freedom:   3

R-squared:         0.5789
Adj R-squared:     0.1577

Rmse:             14.5108

F-stat (2, 2):     1.3746, p-value:     0.4211

Degrees of Freedom: model 2, resid 2

-----------------------Summary of Estimated Coefficients------------------------
      Variable       Coef    Std Err     t-stat    p-value    CI 2.5%   CI 97.5%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             B     0.4012     0.6497       0.62     0.5999    -0.8723     1.6746
             C     0.0004     0.0005       0.65     0.5826    -0.0007     0.0014
     intercept    14.9525    17.7643       0.84     0.4886   -19.8655    49.7705
---------------------------------End of Summary---------------------------------

Note that you need to have statsmodels package installed, it is used internally by the pandas.stats.ols function.

  • 12
    Note that this is going to be deprecated in future version of pandas! – denfromufa Apr 4 '16 at 17:48
  • 4
    Why are doing it? I vividly hope this function survives! It is REALLY useful and quick! – FaCoffee Nov 22 '16 at 17:30
  • 2
    The pandas.stats.ols module is deprecated and will be removed in a future version. We refer to external packages like statsmodels, see some examples here: http://www.statsmodels.org/stable/regression.html – javadba Jan 25 '17 at 0:47
  • 2
    @DestaHaileselassieHagos . This may be due to issue with missing intercepts. The designer of the equivalent R package adjusts by removing the adjustment for the mean: stats.stackexchange.com/a/36068/64552 . . Other suggestions: you can use sm.add_constant to add an intercept to the exog array and use a dict: reg = ols("y ~ x", data=dict(y=y,x=x)).fit() – javadba Jul 4 '17 at 22:38
  • It was a sad day when they removed the pandas.stats 💔 – 3kstc Feb 28 at 0:33

I don't know if this is new in sklearn or pandas, but I'm able to pass the data frame directly to sklearn without converting the data frame to a numpy array or any other data types.

from sklearn import linear_model

reg = linear_model.LinearRegression()
reg.fit(df[['B', 'C']], df['A'])

>>> reg.coef_
array([  4.01182386e-01,   3.51587361e-04])
  • Small diversion from the OP - but I found this particular answer very helpful, after appending .values.reshape(-1, 1) to the dataframe columns. For example: x_data = df['x_data'].values.reshape(-1, 1) and passing the x_data (and a similarly created y_data) np arrays into the .fit() method. – S3DEV Oct 24 '17 at 16:27

This would require me to reformat the data into lists inside lists, which seems to defeat the purpose of using pandas in the first place.

No it doesn't, just convert to a NumPy array:

>>> data = np.asarray(df)

This takes constant time because it just creates a view on your data. Then feed it to scikit-learn:

>>> from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression
>>> lr = LinearRegression()
>>> X, y = data[:, 1:], data[:, 0]
>>> lr.fit(X, y)
LinearRegression(copy_X=True, fit_intercept=True, normalize=False)
>>> lr.coef_
array([  4.01182386e-01,   3.51587361e-04])
>>> lr.intercept_
14.952479503953672
  • 3
    I had to do np.matrix( np.asarray( df ) ), because sklearn expected a vertical vector, whereas numpy arrays, once you slice them off an array, act like horizontal vecotrs, which is great most of the time. – cjohnson318 Jan 8 '14 at 20:05
  • no simple way to do tests of the coefficients with this route, however – MichaelChirico Nov 26 '14 at 2:29
  • 2
    Isn't there a way to directly feed Scikit-Learn with Pandas DataFrame ? – Femto Trader Apr 3 '15 at 15:15
  • for other sklearn modules (decision tree, etc), I've used df['colname'].values, but that didn't work for this. – szeitlin Apr 29 '15 at 23:50
  • 1
    You could also use the .values attribute. I.e., reg.fit(df[['B', 'C']].values, df['A'].values). – 3novak Jan 7 '17 at 2:47

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