1

Working on a java launcher that checks a remote server for the latest version of software available. The server responds with some JSON data, which I'm using gson to convert into an object.

However, the data is always null and I can't figure out why. I've done this a dozen times without a problem.

The class gson will use:

public class VersionResponse {
    public String currentVersion;
}

The code. I've taken a sample json string to avoid any problems with the remote server file. It's valid json, I've verified.

Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().create();
remoteVersionResponse = gson.fromJson("{\"currentVersion\":\"v.0.0.1-96-g48c1f4d\"}", VersionResponse.class);

if( remoteVersionResponse != null ){
    System.out.println("Object: " + remoteVersionResponse.currentVersion);
}

The object's currentVersion property is always showing null.

I feel like I'm missing something really dumb here...

0
public class VersionResponse {
    public String currentVersion;

    public void setCurrentVersion(String version){
        this.currentVersion = version;
    }  

    public String getCurrentVersion(){
       return this.currentVersion;
    } }
0

Found the problem... the obfuscation we have on the build process was breaking the gson's ability to store the values properly.

-1

your VersionResponse class missing getter and setter

public class VersionResponse { public String currentVersion;

public void setCurrentVersion(String version){
    this.currentVersion = version;
}  

public String getCurrentVersion(){
    return this.currentVersion;
}

}

  • Getters and setters are not needed for this. gson should be properly setting the property values. I've used this method a dozen times and I don't see any reason this isn't working. Even their examples don't define any getters/setters. Plus, getters/setters are pretty useless when the property is public – helion3 Nov 15 '13 at 2:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.