3

I'm using .net 2010 c# windows application with this code: to check Valid Uri or not

Code:

static bool IsValidUrl(string urlString)
{
    Uri uri;
    return Uri.TryCreate(urlString, UriKind.Absolute, out uri)
        && (uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeHttp
         || uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeHttps
         || uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeFtp
         || uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeMailto
         );
}

Problem: if i validate this http://http://www.Google.com i'm getting its valid but when i trying to use IE it not showing any site.

Is there any way to find out String is valid uri or not? (with out using regular expressions and internet access)

8
  • well, what's the point of not checking vs the web? if you don't have internet, he won't be able to access it anyways ... – Noctis Nov 15 '13 at 9:17
  • Whether a URL is of valid format and whether it actually points anywhere are different things. – Grant Thomas Nov 15 '13 at 9:19
  • 1
    So you are saying this URI is well-formed? @GrantThomas – Civa Nov 15 '13 at 9:21
  • It is. When you take a look at the rfc3986, you will see that it is possible. Your string will result into the following: Scheme: http, Protocol: http, Resource: //www.Google.com which is a invalid url (for webrequests), but a valid uri. – jAC Nov 15 '13 at 9:32
  • Thanks for Explanation @JanesAbouChleih. May i Know is there any way to validate URL without using internet access. – Civa Nov 15 '13 at 9:36
5

It's not an invalid URI or even a URI that won't ever work: You could use it in a browser somewhere where there was a local machine called "http" (or if you had your Hosts file set to call a machine that).

The problem is that the perfectly correct URI http://http://www.Google.com, which would normlly be used in the form http://http//www.Google.com, because we normlly don't include the : after the host unless we're including the port number, won't work because it fails to find a machine called "http".

Now, even if that would work sometimes, it of course wouldn't work all the time. So it's a different problem to that of the URI http://www.thisdoesnotexistbecauseijustmdeitup.com/.

If you need to also detect that case, then there really is no way other than connecting to the Internet.

If you need to detect URIs that will work globally, rather than just on particular LANs then:

static bool IsGloballyUsableWebMailorFtpUrl(string urlString)
{
  Uri uri;
  if(!Uri.TryCreate(urlString, UriKind.Absolute, out uri))
    return false;
  if(uri.Scheme != Uri.UriSchemeHttp
     && uri.Scheme != Uri.UriSchemeHttps
     && uri.Scheme != Uri.UriSchemeFtp
     && uri.Scheme != Uri.UriSchemeMailto)
     return false;
  string host = uri.Host;
  IPAddress ip;
  if(!IPAddress.TryParse(host, out ip))//if we don't have an IP address in the host part.
    return host.Contains('.') && !host.EndsWith(".local", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase); // Does the domain have at least one period
                                                   // And not the "local" binding used on many
                                                   // Private networks
  var octets = ip.GetAddressBytes();
  if(octets.Length == 4)
    switch(octets[0])//We've an IPv4 IP address, check it's not reserved.
    {
      case 0: case 10: case 127:
        return false;
      case 128: case 191:
        return octets[1] != 0;
      case 169:
        return octets[1] != 254;
      case 172:
        return octets[1] < 16 || octets[1] > 31;
      case 192:
        return octets[1] != 168 && (octets[1] != 0 || octets[2] != 0);
      case 223:
        return octets[1] != 255 && octets[2] != 255;
      default:
        return true;
    }
  else
    {  //We've an IPv6 IP address, check it's not reserved.
      if(IPAddress.HostToNetworkOrder(1) != 1)
        octets = octets.Reverse().ToArray();
      var ipInt = new BigInteger(octets);
      //Not the neatest approach, but serves
      if(ipInt < 0)
        return true;
      if(ipInt < 2)
        return false;
      if(ipInt < 281470681743360)
        return true;
      if(ipInt < 281474976710656)
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("524413980667603649783483181312245760"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("524413980667603649783483185607213056"))
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42540488161975842760550356425300246528"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42540488241204005274814694018844196864"))
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42540489429626442988779757922003451904"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42540490697277043217009159418706657280"))
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42540766411282592856903984951653826560"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42540766490510755371168322545197776896"))
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42545680458834377588178886921629466624"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("42550872755692912415807417417958686720"))
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("334965454937798799971759379190646833152"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("337623910929368631717566993311207522304"))
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("338288524927261089654018896841347694592"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("338620831926207318622244848606417780736"))
        return false;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("338953138925153547590470800371487866880"))
        return true;
      if(ipInt < BigInteger.Parse("340282366920938463463374607431768211456"))
        return false;
      return true;
    }
}

Edit: It's worth considering whether you should do this check at all, if it's for an application that will eventually connect to the URI in question, you're just going to annoy users by refusing to connect to machines on their lan.

4
  • Thanks For Interesting Answer and Explanation. even its not meet my requirement. – Civa Nov 15 '13 at 11:16
  • @Civa what further requirements do you have? It correctly blocks http://http://www.Google.com and cases like it (http://blah/, http://192.168.0.0), and lets through just about any URI for any real website (http://www.google.com, http://193.120.166.84 etc.) and doesn't hit the network to do so. What other possibilities do you need to allow or disallow beyond that? – Jon Hanna Nov 15 '13 at 11:54
  • I working with old library digitization process. they are not give me guaranty that web page is alive right now. so i can't get ip address of such locations. so your solution is not suitable for me. But its interesting approach that's why i given +1 earlier – Civa Nov 15 '13 at 12:12
  • @Civa I only pay attention to IP addresses in the case where the URI entered contains it directly, otherwise that's not a factor. – Jon Hanna Nov 15 '13 at 12:13
2

The best way to know whether a given string represents a valid url, without actually testing it and by bearing in mind the comments above (something which might fit within the given schema, but is not what you consider right), is performing a custom analysis. Also, you should replace your bool function with a string (or an Uri) one able to correct certain situations (like the example you propose). Sample code:

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string rightUrl = returnValidUrl("http://http://www.Google.com");
    if (rightUrl != "")
    {
        //It is OK
    }
}

static string returnValidUrl(string urlString)
{
    string outUrl = "";
    Uri curUri = IsValidUrl(urlString);
    if (curUri != null)
    {
        string headingBit = "http://";
        if (curUri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeHttps) headingBit = "https://";
        if (curUri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeFtp) headingBit = "ftp://";
        if (curUri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeMailto) headingBit = "mailto:";

        outUrl = headingBit + urlString.ToLower().Substring(urlString.ToLower().LastIndexOf(headingBit) + headingBit.Length);
    }

    return outUrl;
}

static Uri IsValidUrl(string urlString)
{
    Uri uri = null;
    bool isValid = Uri.TryCreate(urlString, UriKind.Absolute, out uri)
        && (uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeHttp
         || uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeHttps
         || uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeFtp
         || uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeMailto
         );

    if (!isValid) uri = null;

    return uri;
}

What can be called with:

string rightUrl = returnValidUrl("http://http://www.Google.com");
if (rightUrl != "")
{
    //It is OK
}

You would have to extend this method to recognise as valid/correct all the situations you need.

UPDATE

As suggested via comments and, in order to deliver the exact functionality the OP is looking for (a sample of it; as far as the proposed solution is just an example of the type of casuistic approach, which this problem requires), here you have a corrected bool function considering the posted example wrong:

static bool IsValidUrl2(string urlString)
{
    Uri uri;
    return Uri.TryCreate(urlString, UriKind.Absolute, out uri)
        && ((uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeHttp && numberOfBits(urlString.ToLower(), "http://") == 1)
         || (uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeHttps && numberOfBits(urlString.ToLower(), "https://") == 1)
         || (uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeFtp && numberOfBits(urlString.ToLower(), "ftp://") == 1)
         || (uri.Scheme == Uri.UriSchemeMailto && numberOfBits(urlString.ToLower(), "mailto:") == 1)
         );
}

static int numberOfBits(string inputString, string bitToCheck)
{
    return inputString.ToLower().Split(new string[] { bitToCheck.ToLower() }, StringSplitOptions.None).Length - 1;
}

CLARIFICATION

The only way to be completely sure that a given url is valid or not is actually testing it; but the OP said no connections what I understood as pure string analysis: exactly what this answer is about. In any case, as explained via comments, the intention of this post is just showing the way through: .NET + custom algorithm (by understanding that aiming overall-applicability by relying on string analysis is pretty difficult); my proposal accounts for the specific problem explained by the OP (duplicated "heading parts") and by relying on his conditions. It cannot be understood as a generally-applicable, blindly-usable approach at all; but as a general framework with a sample functionality (a mere proof of concept).

CLARIFICATION 2

As shown in the conversation with Jon Hanna in the comments below, there is a third alternative I wasn't aware of: analysing the to-be IP address (i.e., numbers already put together, but IP address availability not checked yet and thus definitive IP address generation not started); by looking at it, it would also be possible to determine the likelihood of a given string to be a valid URL address (under the expected conditions). In any case, this cannot be considered as a 100% reliable process either, as far as the IP address being analysed is not the definitive one. In any case, Jon Hanna is in a much better position than myself to talk about the limitations of this alternative.

20
  • Though it doesn't stop the URI they complain about. – Jon Hanna Nov 15 '13 at 9:55
  • @JonHanna The whole point of my approach is not stopping it; but correcting it if possible and stopping it if no other option. I will add a correction right now to stopping it. – varocarbas Nov 15 '13 at 9:58
  • @JonHanna There you have a boolean function considering the posted example wrong. – varocarbas Nov 15 '13 at 10:06
  • Can i Compare the result with passing parameter? in string returnValidUrl(string urlString) – Civa Nov 15 '13 at 10:07
  • 1
    @Civa... today you found this problem of http://http:// but tomorrow you will find that you don't want to consider http://co.www.url.com as valid and so on. Thus, my solution to your question is not "take this code and use it blindly"; but a sample of the kind of approach you have to build: one taking into account the .NET capabilities (via Uri Schema, like you are doing) together with a set of custom algorithms finding/correcting situations which shouldn't be considered right. I hope that my point is clearer now. – varocarbas Nov 15 '13 at 10:19
1

You could write a custom function to check if http:// or initial part is repeated alongwith this code you have written.

1
  • I'm not asking for this particular case. i'm searching for generic solution to my problem. – Civa Nov 15 '13 at 9:45

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